236

I would like to create an object with a member added conditionally. The simple approach is:

var a = {};
if (someCondition)
    a.b = 5;

Now, I would like to write a more idiomatic code. I am trying:

a = {
    b: (someCondition? 5 : undefined)
};

But now, b is a member of a whose value is undefined. This is not the desired result.

Is there a handy solution?

Update

I seek for a solution that could handle the general case with several members.

a = {
  b: (conditionB? 5 : undefined),
  c: (conditionC? 5 : undefined),
  d: (conditionD? 5 : undefined),
  e: (conditionE? 5 : undefined),
  f: (conditionF? 5 : undefined),
  g: (conditionG? 5 : undefined),
 };
  • 17
    Yes, there is; the first bit of code. – Paolo Bergantino Jul 28 '12 at 20:08
  • 4
    Not sure there's a such thing as idiomatic JavaScript... – Michael Berkowski Jul 28 '12 at 20:14
  • Does it actually matter? If you never defined a.b, retrieving a.b would return undefined anyway. – Teemu Jul 28 '12 at 20:15
  • 4
    @Teemu: It could matter when the in operator is used. – user1106925 Jul 28 '12 at 20:17
  • 1
    There is no way to have conditional properties in literal objects for now, but I wish they add it in ES7, this could be very handy especially in server side programming! – Ali Sep 10 '16 at 22:38

16 Answers 16

87

In pure Javascript, I cannot think of anything more idiomatic than your first code snippet.

If, however, using the jQuery library is not out of the question, then $.extend() should meet your requirements because, as the documentation says:

Undefined properties are not copied.

Therefore, you can write:

var a = $.extend({}, {
    b: conditionB ? 5 : undefined,
    c: conditionC ? 5 : undefined,
    // and so on...
});

And obtain the results you expect (if conditionB is false, then b will not exist in a).

  • 10
    There's a much better method that doesn't require jQuery. Take a look at Jamie Hill's answer. – Andrew Rasmussen Nov 24 '16 at 16:50
  • 10
    @Andrew, that answer requires ES6, which did not exist at the time I wrote mine. – Frédéric Hamidi Nov 24 '16 at 17:00
  • does null work the same way ? or does it have to be undefined ? – Aous1000 Jun 9 '18 at 0:32
532

I think @InspiredJW did it with ES5, and as @trincot pointed out, using es6 is a better approach. But we can add a bit more sugar, by using the spread operator, and logical AND short circuit evaluation:

const a = {
   ...(someCondition && {b: 5})
}
  • 15
    How does this work? – AlanH Mar 21 '17 at 2:28
  • 13
    I asked if this was valid to the people who made spread proposal and they said this is fine. github.com/tc39/proposal-object-rest-spread/issues/45 , cc @BenjaminDobell – 김민준 May 17 '17 at 3:14
  • 44
    @AlanH spread operator is like a shorthand of Object.assign and have lower precedence than the && operator. It ignore value without property (boolean, null, undefined, number), and add all properties of the object after the ... in place. remember the && operator return the right value if true, or false otherwise. so if someCondition is true, {b : 5} will be passed to the ... operator, resulting in adding the property b to a with value 5. is someCondition is false, falsewill be passed to the ... operator. resulting in nothing added. it's clever. I love it. – Félix Brunet Jul 13 '17 at 16:12
  • 6
    Great answer, but putting the condition and the resulting object being spread into parentheses will greatly improve readability of this example. Not everyone remembers JS operator precedence by heart. – TranslucentCloud Aug 25 '17 at 7:51
  • 2
    The only other issue is you can't use this for false booleans. – ggb667 Apr 19 '18 at 13:31
79

With EcmaScript2015 you can use Object.assign:

Object.assign(a, conditionB ? { b: 1 } : null,
                 conditionC ? { c: 2 } : null,
                 conditionD ? { d: 3 } : null);

var a, conditionB, conditionC, conditionD;
conditionC = true;
a = {};
Object.assign(a, conditionB ? { b: 1 } : null,
                 conditionC ? { c: 2 } : null,
                 conditionD ? { d: 3 } : null);

console.log(a);

Some remarks:

  • Object.assign modifies the first argument in-place, but it also returns the updated object: so you can use this method in a bigger expression that further manipulates the object.
  • Instead of null you could pass undefined or {}, with the same result. You could even provide 0 instead, because primitive values are wrapped, and Number has no own enumerable properties.

Even more concise

Taking the second point further, you could shorten it as follows (as @Jamie has pointed out), as falsy values have no own enumerable properties (false, 0, NaN, null, undefined, '', except document.all):

Object.assign(a, conditionB && { b: 1 },
                 conditionC && { c: 2 },
                 conditionD && { d: 3 });

var a, conditionB, conditionC, conditionD;
conditionC = "this is truthy";
conditionD = NaN; // falsy
a = {};
Object.assign(a, conditionB && { b: 1 },
                 conditionC && { c: 2 },
                 conditionD && { d: 3 });
console.log(a);

  • 1
    I prefer the initial solution: easier to figure out what’s going on – I wouldn’t be sure what happens with a primitive value (at least not without looking at the spec). – Axel Rauschmayer May 11 '17 at 8:56
  • 1
    I love the shorthand that simplifies the ternary logic. This is exactly what I needed. Thank you! – theUtherSide Mar 27 '18 at 23:16
21

What about using Enhanced Object Properties and only set the property if it is truthy, e.g.:

[isConditionTrue() && 'propertyName']: 'propertyValue'

So if the condition is not met it doesn't create the preferred property and thus you can discard it. See: http://es6-features.org/#ComputedPropertyNames

UPDATE: It is even better to follow the approach of Axel Rauschmayer in his blog article about conditionally adding entries inside object literals and arrays (http://2ality.com/2017/04/conditional-literal-entries.html):

const arr = [
  ...(isConditionTrue() ? [{
    key: 'value'
  }] : [])
];

const obj = {
  ...(isConditionTrue() ? {key: 'value'} : {})
};

Quite helped me a lot.

  • 1
    It will almost work. The problem is that it will add an extra false key. For instance, {[true && 'a']: 17, [false && 'b']: 42} is {a:17, false: 42} – viebel Nov 17 '17 at 6:54
  • True, I missed that. Just tried that out again. – Dimitri Reifschneider Nov 22 '17 at 16:55
  • 3
    I found a more concise way: ...isConditionTrue() && { propertyName: 'propertyValue' } – Dimitri Reifschneider Nov 22 '17 at 17:04
  • Better way: ...(isConditionTrue() ? {key: 'value'} : {}) – Dimitri Reifschneider Jan 10 '18 at 14:30
  • The Axel Rauschmayer blog link makes this answer. The "...insertIf(cond, 'a')" example in the article is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks – Joseph Simpson Jun 12 '18 at 8:49
17
const obj = {
   ...(condition) && {someprop: propvalue},
   ...otherprops
}
  • 3
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – Ralf Stubner Jul 5 '18 at 22:23
  • 1
    What does this answer add to Jamie Hill's answer from 2 years earlier? – Dan Dascalescu Jan 21 at 10:19
  • if cond does not match than this will return undefined. – Asif J Feb 6 at 13:23
  • No, if the condition is false nothing will be added. The spread syntax will get an object of the some prop and destruct it if the condition is true or false and then it will add nothing – Lagistos Feb 9 at 8:00
  • This is not a valid syntax. Spread can only be used with iterables. stackoverflow.com/questions/52903050/… – Itai Noam Mar 28 at 11:15
15

Using spread syntax with boolean (as suggested here) is not valid syntax. Spread can only be use with iterables.

I suggest the following:

const a = {
   ...(someCondition? {b: 5}: {} )
}
  • This one should be the accepted answer. – Hossam Mourad Apr 7 at 11:38
  • @HossamMourad, it should not, as the suggested code was already used in an answer posted more than 2 years ago. And the first remark is false. This is valid syntax: {...false} – trincot Apr 30 at 19:17
  • @Itai, this is not true; primitive values are wrapped when used with the spread syntax. {...false} is valid syntax. – trincot Apr 30 at 19:20
  • @trincot, can you please provide reference? – Itai Noam May 3 at 8:52
  • EcmaScript 2018 Language Specification, section 12.2.6(.8) specifies that CopyDataProperties is performed on the value (false in this case). This involves boxing a primitive (sections 7.3.23, 7.1.13). The link you have to MDN mentions this "exception" in parentheses. – trincot May 3 at 9:48
5

If the goal is to have the object appear self-contained and be within one set of braces, you could try this:

var a = new function () {
    if (conditionB)
        this.b = 5;

    if (conditionC)
        this.c = 5;

    if (conditionD)
        this.d = 5;
};
5

If you wish to do this server side (without jquery), you can use lodash 4.3.0:

a = _.pickBy({ b: (someCondition? 5 : undefined) }, _.negate(_.isUndefined));

And this works using lodash 3.10.1

a = _.pick({ b: (someCondition? 5 : undefined) }, _.negate(_.isUndefined));
4

This has long been answered, but looking at other ideas I came up with some interesting derivative:

Assign undefined values to the same property and delete it afterwards

Create your object using an anonymous constructor and always assign undefined members to the same dummy member which you remove at the very end. This will give you a single line (not too complex I hope) per member + 1 additional line at the end.

var a = new function() {
    this.AlwaysPresent = 1;
    this[conditionA ? "a" : "undef"] = valueA;
    this[conditionB ? "b" : "undef"] = valueB;
    this[conditionC ? "c" : "undef"] = valueC;
    this[conditionD ? "d" : "undef"] = valueD;
    ...
    delete this.undef;
};
4
var a = {
    ...(condition ? {b: 1} : '') // if condition is true 'b' will be added.
}

I hope this is the much efficient way to add an entry based on the condition. For more info on how to conditionally add entries inside an object literals.

  • 2
    [...condition?'':['item']] this will add string item into array – Wayou Apr 25 '18 at 7:20
  • How is this answer any better than Jamie Hill's answer from a year earlier? – Dan Dascalescu Jan 21 at 10:20
  • @DanDascalescu Jamie Hill's answer is better than my answer, I didn't think in that way and I used to be more of a ternary-operator guy. – Madhankumar Jan 21 at 10:49
1

I would do this

var a = someCondition ? { b: 5 } : {};

Edited with one line code version

  • if the condition is false, a is nudefined, which is not correct. – bingjie2680 Jul 28 '12 at 20:12
  • @bingjie2680 It isn't that clear what it a should be when someCondition is false. I just assumed a = undefined. It can be easily changed with return { b: undefined }; :/ – InspiredJW Jul 28 '12 at 20:13
  • well, clearly a should be an object anyway. – bingjie2680 Jul 28 '12 at 20:14
  • 1
    That's not really what you would do... is it? I mean even if you were to make the entire literal syntax conditional as you have, why wouldn't you use the conditional operator? a = condition ? {b:5} : undefined; – user1106925 Jul 28 '12 at 20:16
  • 3
    Congrats, you just turned three dead-simple lines into a 7-line function for no gain. No, using an anonymous function is not a benefit. – user395760 Jul 28 '12 at 20:19
0

I think your first approach to adding members conditionally is perfectly fine. I don't really agree with not wanting to have a member b of a with a value of undefined. It's simple enough to add an undefined check with usage of a for loop with the in operator. But anyways, you could easily write a function to filter out undefined members.

var filterUndefined = function(obj) {
  var ret = {};
  for (var key in obj) {
    var value = obj[key];
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key) && value !== undefined) {
      ret[key] = value;
    }
  }
  return ret;
};

var a = filterUndefined({
  b: (conditionB? 5 : undefined),
  c: (conditionC? 5 : undefined),
  d: (conditionD? 5 : undefined),
  e: (conditionE? 5 : undefined),
  f: (conditionF? 5 : undefined),
  g: (conditionG? 5 : undefined),
});

You could also use the delete operator to edit the object in place.

0

Using lodash library, you can use _.omitBy

var a = _.omitBy({
    b: conditionB ? 4 : undefined,
    c: conditionC ? 5 : undefined,
}, _.IsUndefined)

This results handy when you have requests that are optional

var a = _.omitBy({
    b: req.body.optionalA,  //if undefined, will be removed
    c: req.body.optionalB,
}, _.IsUndefined)
0

You can add all your undefined values with no condition and then use JSON.stringify to remove them all :

const person = {
    name:undefined,
    age:22,
    height:null
}
const cleaned = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(person));

//cleaned = {
//         age:22,
//         height:null
//     }
0

Wrap into an object

Something like this is a bit cleaner

 const obj = {
   X: 'dataX',
   Y: 'dataY',
   //...
 }

 const list = {
   A: true && 'dataA',
   B: false && 'dataB',
   C: 'A' != 'B' && 'dataC',
   D: 2000 < 100 && 'dataD',
   // E: conditionE && 'dataE',
   // F: conditionF && 'dataF',
   //...
 }

 Object.keys(list).map(prop => list[prop] ? obj[prop] = list[prop] : null)

Wrap into an array

Or if you want to use Jamie Hill's method and have a very long list of conditions then you must write ... syntax multiple times. To make it a bit cleaner, you can just wrap them into an array, then use reduce() to return them as a single object.

const obj = {
  X: 'dataX',
  Y: 'dataY',
  //...

...[
  true && { A: 'dataA'},
  false && { B: 'dataB'},
  'A' != 'B' && { C: 'dataC'},
  2000 < 100 && { D: 'dataD'},
  // conditionE && { E: 'dataE'},
  // conditionF && { F: 'dataF'},
  //...

 ].reduce(( v1, v2 ) => ({ ...v1, ...v2 }))
}

Or using map() function

const obj = {
  X: 'dataX',
  Y: 'dataY',
  //...
}

const array = [
  true && { A: 'dataA'},
  false &&  { B: 'dataB'},
  'A' != 'B' && { C: 'dataC'},
  2000 < 100 && { D: 'dataD'},
  // conditionE && { E: 'dataE'},
  // conditionF && { F: 'dataF'},
  //...

 ].map(val => Object.assign(obj, val))
-1

Using lodash library, you can use _.merge

var a = _.merge({}, {
    b: conditionB ? 4 : undefined,
    c: conditionC ? 5 : undefined,
})
  1. If conditionB is false & conditionC is true, then a = { c: 5 }
  2. If both conditionB & conditionC are true, then a = { b: 4, c: 5 }
  3. If both conditionB & conditionC are false, then a = {}
  • I get a different result. I'm using lodash@^4.0.0. undefined are being included in my case. – JohnnyQ Apr 4 '18 at 0:06
  • Doesn't work, need to use _.omit instead – htafoya May 18 '18 at 22:56

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