1052

I would like to create an object with a member added conditionally. The simple approach is:

var a = {};
if (someCondition)
    a.b = 5;

Now, I would like to write a more idiomatic code. I am trying:

a = {
    b: (someCondition? 5 : undefined)
};

But now, b is a member of a whose value is undefined. This is not the desired result.

Is there a handy solution?

Update

I seek for a solution that could handle the general case with several members.

a = {
  b: (conditionB? 5 : undefined),
  c: (conditionC? 5 : undefined),
  d: (conditionD? 5 : undefined),
  e: (conditionE? 5 : undefined),
  f: (conditionF? 5 : undefined),
  g: (conditionG? 5 : undefined),
 };
11
  • 21
    Not sure there's a such thing as idiomatic JavaScript... Jul 28, 2012 at 20:14
  • Does it actually matter? If you never defined a.b, retrieving a.b would return undefined anyway.
    – Teemu
    Jul 28, 2012 at 20:15
  • 12
    @Teemu: It could matter when the in operator is used.
    – user1106925
    Jul 28, 2012 at 20:17
  • @amnotiam Oops... that's true, seems that I wasn't thinking all aspects...
    – Teemu
    Jul 28, 2012 at 20:19
  • 5
    There is no way to have conditional properties in literal objects for now, but I wish they add it in ES7, this could be very handy especially in server side programming!
    – Ali
    Sep 10, 2016 at 22:38

25 Answers 25

2189

I think @InspiredJW did it with ES5, and as @trincot pointed out, using es6 is a better approach. But we can add a bit more sugar, by using the spread operator, and logical AND short circuit evaluation:

const a = {
   ...(someCondition && {b: 5})
}
23
  • 9
    I'm not so sure this is correct, the proposal states Null/Undefined Are Ignored, it does not say false is ignored. Transpilers may allow this through at present, but is it compliant? The following ought to be {...someCondition ? {b: 5} : null} but isn't as compact. Feb 28, 2017 at 15:36
  • 64
    I asked if this was valid to the people who made spread proposal and they said this is fine. github.com/tc39/proposal-object-rest-spread/issues/45 , cc @BenjaminDobell
    – 김민준
    May 17, 2017 at 3:14
  • 145
    @AlanH spread operator is like a shorthand of Object.assign and have lower precedence than the && operator. It ignore value without property (boolean, null, undefined, number), and add all properties of the object after the ... in place. remember the && operator return the right value if true, or false otherwise. so if someCondition is true, {b : 5} will be passed to the ... operator, resulting in adding the property b to a with value 5. is someCondition is false, falsewill be passed to the ... operator. resulting in nothing added. it's clever. I love it. Jul 13, 2017 at 16:12
  • 19
    Great answer, but putting the condition and the resulting object being spread into parentheses will greatly improve readability of this example. Not everyone remembers JS operator precedence by heart. Aug 25, 2017 at 7:51
  • 13
    The only other issue is you can't use this for false booleans.
    – ggb667
    Apr 19, 2018 at 13:31
342
const obj = {
   ...(condition) && {someprop: propvalue},
   ...otherprops
}

Live Demo:

const obj = {
  ...(true) && {someprop: 42},
  ...(false) && {nonprop: "foo"},
  ...({}) && {tricky: "hello"},
}

console.log(obj);

9
  • 23
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Jul 5, 2018 at 22:23
  • 13
    What does this answer add to Jamie Hill's answer from 2 years earlier? Jan 21, 2019 at 10:19
  • if cond does not match than this will return undefined.
    – Mustkeem K
    Feb 6, 2019 at 13:23
  • No, if the condition is false nothing will be added. The spread syntax will get an object of the some prop and destruct it if the condition is true or false and then it will add nothing
    – Lagistos
    Feb 9, 2019 at 8:00
  • 4
    Short explanation goes like this: "..." spread operator deconstructs the object literal and adds it to "obj" e.g. in this case ...(true) && {someprop: 42}, the whole term that is to be deconstructed is "(true) && {someprop: 42}", in this case the boolean is true and the term just yields {someprop:42} which is then deconstructed and added into obj. if the boolean is false instead, then the term will just be false, and nothing will be deconstructed and added into obj
    – Qiong Wu
    Sep 26, 2019 at 10:25
164

I suggest the following:

const a = {
   ...(someCondition? {b: 5}: {})
}
2
138

In pure Javascript, I cannot think of anything more idiomatic than your first code snippet.

If, however, using the jQuery library is not out of the question, then $.extend() should meet your requirements because, as the documentation says:

Undefined properties are not copied.

Therefore, you can write:

var a = $.extend({}, {
    b: conditionB ? 5 : undefined,
    c: conditionC ? 5 : undefined,
    // and so on...
});

And obtain the results you expect (if conditionB is false, then b will not exist in a).

2
  • does null work the same way ? or does it have to be undefined ?
    – Aous1000
    Jun 9, 2018 at 0:32
  • 10
    This is actually a wrong answer, because it uses jQuery and this ternary condition won't remove a property from an object, this just would set a property as undefined. See @lagistos answer for the correct way to do this, Mar 13, 2020 at 4:55
121

With EcmaScript2015 you can use Object.assign:

Object.assign(a, conditionB ? { b: 1 } : null,
                 conditionC ? { c: 2 } : null,
                 conditionD ? { d: 3 } : null);

var a, conditionB, conditionC, conditionD;
conditionC = true;
a = {};
Object.assign(a, conditionB ? { b: 1 } : null,
                 conditionC ? { c: 2 } : null,
                 conditionD ? { d: 3 } : null);

console.log(a);

Some remarks:

  • Object.assign modifies the first argument in-place, but it also returns the updated object: so you can use this method in a bigger expression that further manipulates the object.
  • Instead of null you could pass undefined or {}, with the same result. You could even provide 0 instead, because primitive values are wrapped, and Number has no own enumerable properties.

Even more concise

Taking the second point further, you could shorten it as follows (as @Jamie has pointed out), as falsy values have no own enumerable properties (false, 0, NaN, null, undefined, '', except document.all):

Object.assign(a, conditionB && { b: 1 },
                 conditionC && { c: 2 },
                 conditionD && { d: 3 });

var a, conditionB, conditionC, conditionD;
conditionC = "this is truthy";
conditionD = NaN; // falsy
a = {};
Object.assign(a, conditionB && { b: 1 },
                 conditionC && { c: 2 },
                 conditionD && { d: 3 });
console.log(a);

0
65

Perfomance test

Classic approach

const a = {};
if (someCondition)
    a.b = 5;

VS

spread operator approach

const a2 = {
   ...(someCondition && {b: 5})
}

Results:

The classic approach is much faster, so take in consideration that the syntax sugaring is slower.

testClassicConditionFulfilled(); // ~ 234.9ms
testClassicConditionNotFulfilled(); // ~493.1ms
testSpreadOperatorConditionFulfilled(); // ~2649.4ms
testSpreadOperatorConditionNotFulfilled(); // ~2278.0ms

function testSpreadOperatorConditionFulfilled() {
  const value = 5;

  console.time('testSpreadOperatorConditionFulfilled');
  for (let i = 0; i < 200000000; i++) {
    let a = {
      ...(value && {b: value})
    };
  }
  console.timeEnd('testSpreadOperatorConditionFulfilled');
}

function testSpreadOperatorConditionNotFulfilled() {
  const value = undefined;

  console.time('testSpreadOperatorConditionNotFulfilled');
  for (let i = 0; i < 200000000; i++) {
    let a = {
      ...(value && {b: value})
    };
  }
  console.timeEnd('testSpreadOperatorConditionNotFulfilled');
}

function testClassicConditionFulfilled() {
  const value = 5;

  console.time('testClassicConditionFulfilled');
  for (let i = 0; i < 200000000; i++) {
    let a = {};
    if (value)
        a.b = value;
  }
  console.timeEnd('testClassicConditionFulfilled');
}

function testClassicConditionNotFulfilled() {
  const value = undefined;

  console.time('testClassicConditionNotFulfilled');
  for (let i = 0; i < 200000000; i++) {
    let a = {};
    if (value)
        a.b = value;
  }
  console.timeEnd('testClassicConditionNotFulfilled');
}

testClassicConditionFulfilled(); // ~ 234.9ms
testClassicConditionNotFulfilled(); // ~493.1ms
testSpreadOperatorConditionFulfilled(); // ~2649.4ms
testSpreadOperatorConditionNotFulfilled(); // ~2278.0ms

3
  • 2
    practically i don't think it makes diff with small json object
    – minigeek
    Jan 24, 2022 at 9:02
  • 1
    Classic approach is also super easy so I don't really see the point in getting fancy here.
    – Vincent
    May 31, 2022 at 17:33
  • The test uses an N of 200M. And the slowest still takes less than 3 seconds so its fine to use any depending on your application.
    – Akaisteph7
    Sep 18, 2023 at 23:41
59

SIMPLE ES6 SOLUTION

Single condition with (&) - if condition

const didIPassExam = true

const study = {
  monday : 'writing',
  tuesday : 'reading',
  
  /* check conditionally and if true, then add wednesday to study */

  ...(didIPassExam && {wednesday : 'sleep happily'})
}


console.log(study)

Dual condition with (? :) - if-else condition

const score = 110
//const score = 10

const storage = {
  a:10,
  b:20,
  ...(score > 100  ? {c: 30} : {d:40}) 
}

console.log(storage)

Explanation

Let's say you have storage object like this

const storage = {
  a : 10,
  b : 20,
}

and you would like to add a prop to this conditionally based on score

const score = 90

You would now like to add prop c:30 to storage if score is greater than 100.

If score is less than 100, then you want to add d:40 to storage. You can do like this

const score = 110

const storage = {
  a:10,
  b:20,
  ...(score > 100  ? {c: 30} : {d:40}) 
}

The above code gives storage as

{
  a: 10,
  b: 20,
  c: 30
}

If score = 90

then you get storage as

{
  a: 10,
  b: 20,
  d: 40
}

Codepen example

4
  • 2
    Here is the link to the MDN docs on this syntax (spread syntax) Apr 26, 2023 at 23:30
  • What if I want to include "c" when a condition is met and don't do anything when condition is not met.
    – Vasanth
    Oct 10, 2023 at 4:54
  • 1
    @Vasanth, see the first example const didIPassExam = true You might be looking for something similar Oct 10, 2023 at 13:29
  • Thanks for the response @SandeepAmarnath my problem solved !!
    – Vasanth
    Oct 16, 2023 at 6:22
32

What about using Enhanced Object Properties and only set the property if it is truthy, e.g.:

[isConditionTrue() && 'propertyName']: 'propertyValue'

So if the condition is not met it doesn't create the preferred property and thus you can discard it. See: http://es6-features.org/#ComputedPropertyNames

UPDATE: It is even better to follow the approach of Axel Rauschmayer in his blog article about conditionally adding entries inside object literals and arrays (http://2ality.com/2017/04/conditional-literal-entries.html):

const arr = [
  ...(isConditionTrue() ? [{
    key: 'value'
  }] : [])
];

const obj = {
  ...(isConditionTrue() ? {key: 'value'} : {})
};

Quite helped me a lot.

4
  • 1
    It will almost work. The problem is that it will add an extra false key. For instance, {[true && 'a']: 17, [false && 'b']: 42} is {a:17, false: 42}
    – viebel
    Nov 17, 2017 at 6:54
  • 4
    I found a more concise way: ...isConditionTrue() && { propertyName: 'propertyValue' } Nov 22, 2017 at 17:04
  • Better way: ...(isConditionTrue() ? {key: 'value'} : {}) Jan 10, 2018 at 14:30
  • The Axel Rauschmayer blog link makes this answer. The "...insertIf(cond, 'a')" example in the article is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks Jun 12, 2018 at 8:49
14

This is probably the shortest solution with ES6

console.log({
   ...true && {foo: 'bar'}
})
// Output: {foo:'bar'}
console.log({
   ...false && {foo: 'bar'}
})
// Output: {}
3
  • what if we want to spread all the keys of the object into an existing object ? Not just "foo" Jan 31, 2022 at 8:23
  • @cafebabe1991 Add another spread.
    – Brad
    Feb 25, 2022 at 7:47
  • Like ...false && ...{} Feb 26, 2022 at 19:11
13

I made a small benchmark with one other option. I like to remove "dead weight" from some objects. Usually falsy values.

Here are the benny results:

clean

const clean = o => {
    for (const prop in o) if (!o) delete o[prop];
}

clean({ value });

spread

let a = {
    ...(value && {b: value})
};

if

let a = {};
if (value) {
    a.b = value;
}

results

clean  :  84 918 483 ops/s, ±1.16%    | 51.58% slower    
spread :  20 188 291 ops/s, ±0.92%    | slowest, 88.49% slower    
if     : 175 368 197 ops/s, ±0.50%    | fastest
10

I would do this

var a = someCondition ? { b: 5 } : {};
1
  • 1
    Much better, thank you. Now the only problem is duplication if there are mandatory arguments (var o = cond ? {a: 1} : {a: 1, b: 2}).
    – user395760
    Jul 28, 2012 at 20:23
7

If the goal is to have the object appear self-contained and be within one set of braces, you could try this:

var a = new function () {
    if (conditionB)
        this.b = 5;

    if (conditionC)
        this.c = 5;

    if (conditionD)
        this.d = 5;
};
7

You can add all your undefined values with no condition and then use JSON.stringify to remove them all :

const person = {
  name: undefined,
  age: 22,
  height: null
}

const cleaned = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(person));

// Contents of cleaned:

// cleaned = {
//   age: 22,
//   height: null
// }
1
  • This is considered quite slow which might be a factor for big objects but more importantly, it will not only remove undefined values but also any functions defined in your object.
    – Mikey
    Sep 24, 2022 at 11:38
5

This has long been answered, but looking at other ideas I came up with some interesting derivative:

Assign undefined values to the same property and delete it afterwards

Create your object using an anonymous constructor and always assign undefined members to the same dummy member which you remove at the very end. This will give you a single line (not too complex I hope) per member + 1 additional line at the end.

var a = new function() {
    this.AlwaysPresent = 1;
    this[conditionA ? "a" : "undef"] = valueA;
    this[conditionB ? "b" : "undef"] = valueB;
    this[conditionC ? "c" : "undef"] = valueC;
    this[conditionD ? "d" : "undef"] = valueD;
    ...
    delete this.undef;
};
4

If you wish to do this server side (without jquery), you can use lodash 4.3.0:

a = _.pickBy({ b: (someCondition? 5 : undefined) }, _.negate(_.isUndefined));

And this works using lodash 3.10.1

a = _.pick({ b: (someCondition? 5 : undefined) }, _.negate(_.isUndefined));
1
  • No need for lodash in ES6. Jan 21, 2019 at 10:18
2
var a = {
    ...(condition ? {b: 1} : '') // if condition is true 'b' will be added.
}

I hope this is the much efficient way to add an entry based on the condition. For more info on how to conditionally add entries inside an object literals.

2
1

Using lodash library, you can use _.omitBy

var a = _.omitBy({
    b: conditionB ? 4 : undefined,
    c: conditionC ? 5 : undefined,
}, _.IsUndefined)

This results handy when you have requests that are optional

var a = _.omitBy({
    b: req.body.optionalA,  //if undefined, will be removed
    c: req.body.optionalB,
}, _.IsUndefined)
1

This is the most succinct solution I can come up with:

var a = {};
conditionB && a.b = 5;
conditionC && a.c = 5;
conditionD && a.d = 5;
// ...
1

i prefere, using code this it, you can run this code

const three = {
  three: 3
}

// you can active this code, if you use object `three is null`
//const three = {}

const number = {
  one: 1,
  two: 2,
  ...(!!three && three),
  four: 4
}

console.log(number);
1

To expand on the ES6 based answers, I created this utility Typescript functions, that make the usage (in my opinion) more readable and less like a magical formula, and the intention very clear, and has the correct types:

/**
 * Creates a simple object with ot without the specified property and value, depending on the condition.
 * Usage: When creating an object literal that needs to include a property only in some cases.
 * Use it with the spread operator.
 * @example
 * const user = {
 *   username,
 *   // will include the property only if isInternalUser() returns true
 *   ...conditionalObjectProperty('password', isInternalUser(), () => getUserPassword())
 * }
 * @param propertyName
 * @param condition
 * @param valueCreator
 */
export function conditionalObjectProperty<P extends string, V> (propertyName: P, condition: boolean, valueCreator: () => V) {
  return condition
    ? { [propertyName]: valueCreator() }
    : {};
}

/**
 * Specialized conditional property creator that creates an object containing a specified property
 * only when its value is non-nullable.
 * Use in object literals with the spread operator.
 * @example
 * const middleName: string|undefined = getMiddleName();
 * const user = {
 *   userName,
 *   firstName,
 *   lastName,
 *   // will be included only if middleName is non-nullable
 *   ...optionalObjectProperty('middleName', middleName)
 * }
 * @param propertyName
 * @param value
 */
export function optionalObjectProperty<P extends string, V> (propertyName: P, value: V) {
  return conditionalObjectProperty(propertyName, value != null, () => value);
}

0

I think your first approach to adding members conditionally is perfectly fine. I don't really agree with not wanting to have a member b of a with a value of undefined. It's simple enough to add an undefined check with usage of a for loop with the in operator. But anyways, you could easily write a function to filter out undefined members.

var filterUndefined = function(obj) {
  var ret = {};
  for (var key in obj) {
    var value = obj[key];
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key) && value !== undefined) {
      ret[key] = value;
    }
  }
  return ret;
};

var a = filterUndefined({
  b: (conditionB? 5 : undefined),
  c: (conditionC? 5 : undefined),
  d: (conditionD? 5 : undefined),
  e: (conditionE? 5 : undefined),
  f: (conditionF? 5 : undefined),
  g: (conditionG? 5 : undefined),
});

You could also use the delete operator to edit the object in place.

-1

Using lodash library, you can use _.merge

var a = _.merge({}, {
    b: conditionB ? 4 : undefined,
    c: conditionC ? 5 : undefined,
})
  1. If conditionB is false & conditionC is true, then a = { c: 5 }
  2. If both conditionB & conditionC are true, then a = { b: 4, c: 5 }
  3. If both conditionB & conditionC are false, then a = {}
2
  • 1
    I get a different result. I'm using lodash@^4.0.0. undefined are being included in my case.
    – JohnnyQ
    Apr 4, 2018 at 0:06
  • @JohnnyQ As of Lodash version 4.17.21, _.merge({}, { x: undefined, y: 1 }); returns { "y": 1 }. Mar 14, 2021 at 5:09
-1

Wrap into an object

Something like this is a bit cleaner

 const obj = {
   X: 'dataX',
   Y: 'dataY',
   //...
 }

 const list = {
   A: true && 'dataA',
   B: false && 'dataB',
   C: 'A' != 'B' && 'dataC',
   D: 2000 < 100 && 'dataD',
   // E: conditionE && 'dataE',
   // F: conditionF && 'dataF',
   //...
 }

 Object.keys(list).map(prop => list[prop] ? obj[prop] = list[prop] : null)

Wrap into an array

Or if you want to use Jamie Hill's method and have a very long list of conditions then you must write ... syntax multiple times. To make it a bit cleaner, you can just wrap them into an array, then use reduce() to return them as a single object.

const obj = {
  X: 'dataX',
  Y: 'dataY',
  //...

...[
  true && { A: 'dataA'},
  false && { B: 'dataB'},
  'A' != 'B' && { C: 'dataC'},
  2000 < 100 && { D: 'dataD'},
  // conditionE && { E: 'dataE'},
  // conditionF && { F: 'dataF'},
  //...

 ].reduce(( v1, v2 ) => ({ ...v1, ...v2 }))
}

Or using map() function

const obj = {
  X: 'dataX',
  Y: 'dataY',
  //...
}

const array = [
  true && { A: 'dataA'},
  false &&  { B: 'dataB'},
  'A' != 'B' && { C: 'dataC'},
  2000 < 100 && { D: 'dataD'},
  // conditionE && { E: 'dataE'},
  // conditionF && { F: 'dataF'},
  //...

 ].map(val => Object.assign(obj, val))
-2

For the sake of completeness you can use Object.defineProperty() if you want to add additional descriptors. Note I purposely added enumerable: true otherwise the property wouldn't appear in the console.log(). The advantage with this approach is that you can also use Object.defineProperties() if you want to add multiple new properties (However, in this way every property will be dependent on the same condition...)

const select = document.getElementById("condition");
const output = document.getElementById("output");
let a = {};
let b = {};

select.onchange = (e) => {
  const condition = e.target.value === "true";
  condition
    ? Object.defineProperty(a, "b", {
        value: 5,
        enumerable: true,
      })
    : (a = {});

  condition
    ? Object.defineProperties(b, {
        c: {
          value: 5,
          enumerable: true,
        },
        d: {
          value: 6,
          enumerable: true,
        },
        e: {
          value: 7,
          enumerable: true,
        },
      })
    : (b = {});

  outputSingle.innerText = JSON.stringify(a);
  outputMultiple.innerText = JSON.stringify(b);
};
Condition:
<select id="condition">
  <option value="false">false</option>
  <option value="true">true</option>
</select>
<br/>
<br/>
Single Property: <pre id="outputSingle">{}</pre><br/>
Multiple Properties: <pre id="outputMultiple">{}</pre>

-3

Define a var by let and just assign new property

let msg = {
    to: "[email protected]",
    from: "[email protected]",
    subject: "Contact form",    
};

if (file_uploaded_in_form) { // the condition goes here
    msg.attachments = [ // here 'attachments' is the new property added to msg Javascript object
      {
        content: "attachment",
        filename: "filename",
        type: "mime_type",
        disposition: "attachment",
      },
    ];
}

Now the msg become

{
    to: "[email protected]",
    from: "[email protected]",
    subject: "Contact form",
    attachments: [
      {
        content: "attachment",
        filename: "filename",
        type: "mime_type",
        disposition: "attachment",
      },
    ]
}

In my opinion this is very simple and easy solution.

1
  • you can add new properties to objects even when they are const
    – leoschet
    Jul 29, 2020 at 12:32

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