118

What is the difference between using self and static in the example below?

class Foo
{
    protected static $bar = 1234;

    public static function instance()
    {
        echo self::$bar;
        echo "\n";
        echo static::$bar;
    }

}

Foo::instance();

produces

1234
1234
  • 2
    @deceze: That's a similar question, but it isn't a duplicate. This one asks about using the keywords with properties, while that asks about using them with constructors. – BoltClock Jul 29 '12 at 14:55
185

When you use self to refer to a class member, you're referring to the class within which you use the keyword. In this case, your Foo class defines a protected static property called $bar. When you use self in the Foo class to refer to the property, you're referencing the same class.

Therefore if you tried to use self::$bar elsewhere in your Foo class but you had a Bar class with a different value for the property, it would use Foo::$bar instead of Bar::$bar, which may not be what you intend:

class Foo
{
    protected static $bar = 1234;
}

class Bar extends Foo
{
    protected static $bar = 4321;
}

When you call a method via static, you're invoking a feature called late static bindings (introduced in PHP 5.3).

In the above scenario, using self will result in Foo::$bar(1234). And using static will result in Bar::$bar (4321) because with static, the interpreter takes takes into account the redeclaration within the Bar class during runtime.

You typically use late static bindings for methods or even the class itself, rather than properties, as you don't often redeclare properties in subclasses; an example of using the static keyword for invoking a late-bound constructor can be found in this related question: New self vs. new static

However, that doesn't preclude using static with properties as well.

| improve this answer | |
  • You might very easily redeclare in the child class, the parent class might be a default value that the child class uses unless they re-declare. If you are in the parent class, I guess it is safe to use self::, and if in a child class, you could come up with an argument to use either one, but self:: will also work if you dont expect to re-declare ever. – Andrew Feb 3 '17 at 16:37
  • 3
    go to phpfiddle.org and run this <?php class Foo { public static $bar = 1234; public static function a( ) { echo 'static'.static::$bar; echo 'self'.self::$bar; } } class Bar extends Foo { public static $bar = 4321; } (new Bar())->a(); ?> – Yevgeniy Afanasyev May 23 '19 at 1:31
  • 2
    The first two paragraph wording is confusing, has an ambiguous pronoun, "it", and is also redunant, as a later paragraphs explains the same information more clearly. I suggest replacing the first two paragraphs with the later paragraph that starts with "In the above scenario" to the top. That way the bottom line, cut-to-the-chase answer is at the top. It's clear and easy to follow. – ahnbizcad Nov 13 '19 at 20:06
  • Another way to think about this: self::$abc, when used inside class Foo is the same as saying Foo::$abc. It won't be affected by any re-declaration of $abc in a subclass. AFAIK, the only reason to use self is as a shorthand, to avoid using the class name Foo, which may be longer. [It also means you can change the classname without changing all those places - but that isn't much of a reason IMHO.] (PHP's choice of names is unfortunate, and seems backwards; "static" is the one that can change - which is opposite to the colloquial meaning of the natural-language word "static".) – ToolmakerSteve Feb 16 at 5:36
2

As mentioned one of the main differences is that static allows for late static bindings. One of the most useful scenarios that I found was for creating Base classes for Singleton Classes:

class A { // Base Class
    protected static $name = '';
    protected static function getName() {
        return static::$name;
    }
}
class B extends A {
    protected static $name = 'MyCustomNameB';
}
class C extends A {
    protected static $name = 'MyCustomNameC';
}

echo B::getName(); // MyCustomNameB
echo C::getName(); // MyCustomNameC

Using return static::$name in the Base class will return what was statically attached when it was extended. If you were to use return self::$name then B::getName() would return an empty string as that is what is declared in the Base class.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.