26

I have a setTimeout defined inside of a function that controls the player's respawn (i am creating a game):

var player = {
    ...
    death:(function() {
        this.alive = false;
        Console.log("death!");
        var timer3 = setTimeout((function() {
            this.alive = true;
            Console.log("alive!");
        }),3000);
    }),
    ...
}

When it executes, I read in the console, "death!" and 3 seconds later "alive!". However, alive is never really set back to true, because if i write player.alive in the console, it returns false. How come i can see "alive!" but the variable is never set back to true?

  • in this scope this is the anonymous function passed to the setTimeout, you need to assign this to some other variable and check it later – haynar Jul 30 '12 at 1:21
28

You have to be careful with this. You need to assign your this in the outer scope to a variable. The this keyword always refers to the this of the current scope, which changes any time you wrap something in function() { ... }.

var thing = this;
thing.alive = false;
Console.log("death!");
var timer3 = setTimeout((function() {
    thing.alive = true;
    Console.log("alive!");
}),3000);

This should give you better success.

  • worked great. thanks. – Polyov Jul 30 '12 at 1:34
  • 3
    For extra credit, read up on javascript's function .call() and .apply() methods, which help to understand how this works in javascript, and can come in handy when you need to define the function somewhere other than where you're passing it. jQuery's .proxy() and Prototype's .bind() provide neat wrappers to this functionality. – undefined Jul 30 '12 at 1:46
  • Further to what @BrianMortenson said, JS has its own .bind() method (introduced in version 1.8.5, so not supported in older IE). Actually one of the examples on that MDN page is for use with setTimeout(). – nnnnnn Jul 30 '12 at 4:00
  • Further to what @nnnnnn said, if you are using ES6 you can use arrowed functions. () => setTimeout( ()=> this.alive = true, 3000) – Umit Nov 22 '16 at 2:17
18

It's because this in the setTimeout handler is referring to window, which is presumably not the same value as referenced by this outside the handler.

You can cache the outer value, and use it inside...

var self = this;

var timer3 = setTimeout((function() {
    self.alive = true;
    Console.log("alive!");
}),3000);

...or you can use ES5 Function.prototype.bind...

var timer3 = setTimeout((function() {
    this.alive = true;
    Console.log("alive!");
}.bind(this)),3000);

...though if you're supporting legacy implementations, you'll need to add a shim to Function.prototype.


...or if you're working in an ES6 environment...

var timer3 = setTimeout(()=>{
    this.alive = true;
    Console.log("alive!");
},3000);

Because there's no binding of this in Arrow functions.

7

Just in case anyone reads this, the new javascript syntax allows you to bind a scope to a function with "bind":

window.setTimeout(this.doSomething.bind(this), 1000);
  • Unfortunately binding directly to the function like this doesn't appear to work (at least, not in Chrome 60). It seems that you have to run it through an anonymous function first, as in the "community wiki" ES5 example above. – Niall Jackson Aug 21 '17 at 12:26
5

Probably because this isn't preserved in the timeout callback. Try:

var that = this;
...
var timer3 = setTimeout(function() {
    that.alive = true;
    ...

Update (2017) - or use a lambda function, which will implicitly capture this:

var timer3 = setTimeout(() => {
    this.alive = true;
    ...
  • In my humble opinion the that = this solution should not be used anymore because it only adds to the confusion caused by the this keyword. Preferably you should use arrow notation setInterval( () => {}) or else use bind() to fix javascript's scoping issues. – Kokodoko Aug 21 '17 at 13:18
  • 1
    @Kokodoko I agree! This was answered in 2012. I'll update the answer. – James McLaughlin Aug 22 '17 at 12:55
4

With ES6 function syntax, the scope for 'this' doesn't change inside setTimeout:

var timer3 = setTimeout((() => {
    this.alive = true;
    console.log("alive!");
}), 3000);

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