45

I would like to know how to split up a large string into a series of smaller strings or words. For example:

I want to walk my dog.

I want to have a string: "I", another string:"want", etc.

How would I do this?

2
  • 4
    Please show what you've tried (did you look for the word "split" in the docs for String, for example?) – Jon Skeet Jul 30 '12 at 16:53
  • 11
    Yes, String#split() is named very ambiguously :-P – maksimov Jul 30 '12 at 16:53

12 Answers 12

81

Use split() method

Eg:

String s = "I want to walk my dog";
String[] arr = s.split(" ");    

for ( String ss : arr) {
    System.out.println(ss);
}
1
  • 26
    This method will not remove commas, dots, and so on from the words. – kazy Mar 27 '15 at 13:20
67

As a more general solution (but ASCII only!), to include any other separators between words (like commas and semicolons), I suggest:

String s = "I want to walk my dog, cat, and tarantula; maybe even my tortoise.";
String[] words = s.split("\\W+");

The regex means that the delimiters will be anything that is not a word [\W], in groups of at least one [+]. Because [+] is greedy, it will take for instance ';' and ' ' together as one delimiter.

1
  • 7
    \\W only seems to consider ASCII alphabetic characters. It isn't suitable for languages with accents. – rghome May 19 '17 at 13:56
29

A regex can also be used to split words.

\w can be used to match word characters ([A-Za-z0-9_]), so that punctuation is removed from the results:

String s = "I want to walk my dog, and why not?";
Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\w+");
Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(s);
while (matcher.find()) {
    System.out.println(matcher.group());
}

Outputs:

I
want
to
walk
my
dog
and
why
not

See Java API documentation for Pattern

2
10

See my other answer if your phrase contains accentuated characters :

String[] listeMots = phrase.split("\\P{L}+");
1
  • 4
    This is the best answer. – rghome May 19 '17 at 14:06
5

Yet another method, using StringTokenizer :

String s = "I want to walk my dog";
StringTokenizer tokenizer = new StringTokenizer(s);

while(tokenizer.hasMoreTokens()) {
    System.out.println(tokenizer.nextToken());
}
3
  • ah! this is good in case where i dont need an array but isn't tokenizer returning an array of token? nice idea though – Coding Enthusiast Jan 20 '17 at 21:42
  • No, there isn't any array being produced . StringTokenizer looks for the consecutive tokens in the string and returns them one by one. – Kao Jan 21 '17 at 12:55
  • 1
    Nice solution, unfortunately, StringTokenizer should not be used anymore. From the Docs: StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead. – Tomor Jan 6 '18 at 19:24
3

To include any separators between words (like everything except all lower case and upper case letters), we can do:

String mystring = "hi, there,hi Leo";
String[] arr = mystring.split("[^a-zA-Z]+");
for(int i = 0; i < arr.length; i += 1)
{
     System.out.println(arr[i]);
}

Here the regex means that the separators will be anything that is not a upper or lower case letter [^a-zA-Z], in groups of at least one [+].

2

You can use split(" ") method of the String class and can get each word as code given below:

String s = "I want to walk my dog";
String []strArray=s.split(" ");
for(int i=0; i<strArray.length;i++) {
     System.out.println(strArray[i]);
}
1

Use split()

String words[] = stringInstance.split(" ");
1
  • 1
    Please go through the link from answer – jmj Jul 30 '12 at 16:59
1

you can use Apache commons' StringUtils class

    String[] partsOfString = StringUtils.split("I want to walk my dog",StringUtils.SPACE)
1
StringTokenizer separate = new StringTokenizer(s, " ");
String word = separate.nextToken();
System.out.println(word);
0

This regex will split word by space like space, tab, line break:

String[] str = s.split("\\s+");
-1
String[] str = s.split("[^a-zA-Z]+");
1
  • Pattern matching of your own is usually not the best way to go; use solutions of people who have done that already and thought of all the weird corner cases that you don't think of at the moment of writing. Also, as a rule of thumb, I would rather go with a whitelist of whitespace characters here instead of trying to match the words as you miss out on umlauts etc. – Cherusker Jan 21 '19 at 17:43

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