25

AFAIK, if an "if" block is not provided the curly braces then only 1 statement is considered inside it. e.g.

if(..)
  statement_1;
  statement_2;

Irrespective of tabs, only statement_1 is considered inside the if block.

Following code doesn't get along with that:

int main ()
{
  if(false)  // outer - if
    if(false)  // nested - if
      cout << "false false\n";
  else if(true)
    cout << "true\n";
}

Above code doesn't print anything. It should have printed "true".
It appears as of the else if is automatically nested inside the outer if block. g++ -Wall issues warning, but that is not the question here. Once you put the curly braces, everything goes fine as expected.

Why such different behavior ?
[GCC demo: without braces and with braces].

2
  • 5
    @tbert why not?
    – iammilind
    Jul 31, 2012 at 10:45
  • 2
    i dont see why this is an issue, for my time in C++ i've never thought this weird. The nested 'if' and it's next lines all the way to 'else if' and the line after it are part of the same statement which is what is important, line counts do not come into this, just like indenting, which you yourself pointed out, does not either. Mar 19, 2014 at 13:56

5 Answers 5

61

The behaviour isn’t actually different, it’s entirely consistent: the whole inner if block – including else if – is considered as one block.

This is a classical ambiguity in parsing, known as the “dangling-else problem”: there are two valid ways of parsing this when the grammar is written down in the normal BNF:

Either the trailing else is part of the outer block, or of the inner block.

Most languages resolve the ambiguity by (arbitrarily) deciding that blocks are matched greedily by the parser – i.e. the else [if] is assigned to the closest if.

6
  • 1
    The link and the last "greedy" line says it all.
    – iammilind
    Jul 31, 2012 at 6:56
  • 3
    That's the fastest +10 I've seen in a while!
    – Mysticial
    Jul 31, 2012 at 6:58
  • "Most languages"? Do you know a language which does in another way (well, excepted mandating brackets or ending syntax which are ways to avoid the dandling else, not to solve the ambiguity)? Doing otherwise means that you'll have to check how many else are pending (in if if if else else for instance would be matched with the second if, while in if if if else it would be matched with the first). Jul 31, 2012 at 7:53
  • 3
    @AProgrammer I don’t know of any other language, I just wanted to cover my ass. I’m sure there are at least some experimental languages which do it differently just because. Jul 31, 2012 at 8:26
  • python uses indenting to solve the problem (is that an "ending syntax"?:) Jul 31, 2012 at 8:27
7

Because the else is actually being grouped with the inner if, not the outer one. It's actually being parsed as

int main ()
{
  if(false)  // outer - if (never gets executed)
  { 
    if(false)  // nested - if
    {
        cout << "false false\n";
    } else if(true) {
        cout << "true\n";
    }
  }
}

You can solve the problem by explicitly putting the braces where you want them.

2

It shouldn't print anything. It is the equivalent to this, since the second if/else if is one block that belongs to the first if:

  if(false) {
    if(false)  // nested - if
      cout << "false false\n";
    else if(true)
      cout << "true\n";
  } 
3
  • Correct, now the question is .. why
    – iammilind
    Jul 31, 2012 at 6:52
  • @iammilind why "why"? if (...) else is one statement. That's all. The outer if is followed by a statement which only ends at the if inside the else. It is the same as with regexes - matching a/b/c with (.*)/(.*), should group 1 be a and group 2 be b/c or should group 1 be a/b and group 2 be c? It is the latter, because regexes are "greedy", and so is the C parser.
    – glglgl
    Jul 31, 2012 at 6:58
  • 1
    @glglgl FYI I inserted the "since..." only after iammilind's comment. At first I just said it was equivalent because I thought it was apparent, but as you can see from the votes, it needed to be clarified more :) Jul 31, 2012 at 7:02
2

else statement always attaches to nearest if. Without branches nested if itself does not form meaningful statement, so parser goes on.

2

It is quite natural from the C parser viepoint.

The parser, while parsing if-statement, parses the condition expression first, then parses the first statement after condition, then looks for else keyword and, if the else presents, parses the second (alternative) statement.

However, the first statement is an if-statement too, so the parser calls the "if-parser" recursively (before testing for else keyword!). This recursive call parses the inner if-else statement completely (including else), and moves token position "past the end" of the whole code fragment.

Any attempt to implement alternative behaviour should involve some additional communication between "outer" and "inner" if-parsers: the outer parser should inform the "inner" not to be greedy(i.e. not to eat the else statement). This would add additional complexity to the language syntax.

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