[TestMethod]
public void TestMethod1()
{
    var mock = new Mock<EmailService>();
    mock.Setup(x => x.SendEmail()).Returns(true);
    var cus = new Customer();
    var result = cus.AddCustomer(mock.Object);
    Assert.IsTrue(result);
}

public class Customer
{
    public bool AddCustomer(EmailService emailService)
    {
        emailService.SendEmail();
        Debug.WriteLine("new customer added");
        return true;
    }
}

public class EmailService
{            
    public virtual bool SendEmail()
    {
        throw  new Exception("send email failed cuz bla bla bla");
    }
}

The EmailService.SendEmail method must be virtual to mock it. Is there any way to mock non virtual methods?

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Moq cannot mock non virtual methods on classes. Either use other mocking frameworks such as Type mock Isolator which actually weaves IL into your assembly or place an interface on EmailService and mock that.

  • I know this a very old post, but had some similar issue. Are there any down sides of converting the method into virtual, when the actual application runs? – CrazyCoder Jun 26 at 5:24
  • I recommend asking a separate question in SO. – aqwert Jun 26 at 22:34

Mocking non virtual methods involves the use of low level profiler API. At the moment I think the only options available are :

both are commercial, even if JustMock have a lite edition, mocking non virtual methods are available just with the commercial version. As pointed in the comments there is something from Microsoft research, in the project Pex and Moles

  • 5
    I think you can add Microsoft Moles/Pex/Fakes to that list. As a bonus, it's free. – podiluska Jul 31 '12 at 10:43
  • Fakes is not included in the express edition of VS. – Mike C Aug 19 '15 at 23:30
  • There is also now Pose – Cocowalla Jun 13 at 20:06

The alternative to having to use virtual methods for mocking is to use interfaces. This way you can mock out a whole dependency.

public interface IEmailService
{
    bool SendEmail();
    // etc...
}

public class EmailService : IEmailService
{
    //...
}

Now you can create mocks of the interface IEmailService to let you mock any of its methods. Of course, you'll have to change the types of variables containing EmailService objects to IEmailService where appropriate.

  • I think using this technique is good, and there are certainly advantages to using interfaces. But if you're evaluating between the two options for a non-virtual method to be mockable: 1) make it virtual, 2) use it as part of the interface, what is the advantage of 2 over 1? Even if you pick 2, then you're effectively making the method virtual since it's now part of an interface. – zumalifeguard Jun 25 '15 at 17:10

Use pose. Allows you to replace any method including static or non virtual. Fairly new project, but fully open source MIT license. https://github.com/tonerdo/pose

As @aqwert and @Felice wrote when using Typemock Isolator it's possible (and pretty easy) to mock Non-virtual methods without adding or changing any code, for example:

[TestMethod,Isolated]
    public void TestMethod1()
    {
        var mock = Isolate.Fake.Instance<EmailService>();
        Isolate.WhenCalled(() => mock.SendEmail()).WillReturn(true);
        var cust = new Customer();
        var result = cust.AddCustomer(mock);
        Assert.IsTrue(result);
    }

as you can see the test i've created is similar to the test you tried to create.

The only way to mock non virtual methods is to mock interface used to implement that class with non virtual methods. Below is the example.

public interface IEmployee
{
    DateTime GetDateofJoining(int id);
}

public class Employee
{
    public DateTime GetDateofJoining(int id)
    {
        return DateTime.Now;
    }
}

    public class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var employee = new Mock<IEmployee>();
        employee.Setup(x => x.GetDateofJoining(It.IsAny<int>())).Returns((int x) => DateTime.Now);

        Console.WriteLine(employee.Object.GetDateofJoining(1));
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

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