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I am a bit confused by this paragraph in python docs for dict class

If items(), keys(), values(), iteritems(), iterkeys(), and itervalues() are called with no intervening modifications to the dictionary, the lists will directly correspond. This allows the creation of (value, key) pairs using zip(): pairs = zip(d.values(), d.keys())

what is meant by called with no intervening modifications ?

if I receive a dict instance which was spewed out by some function(I have no way of knowing if the elements were modified since the dict was created)..can I still use the zip(d.values(),d.keys()) ?

1 Answer 1

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Yes.

The point is you should not modify d between calling d.values() and d.keys().

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  • Interesting because the list comp runs faster for me on Python 2.7. 0.53 usec for list comp compared to 0.692 usec for zip
    – jamylak
    Jul 31, 2012 at 12:12
  • @jamylak I'll remove that claim then. Jul 31, 2012 at 12:13
  • Ok well here are the tests i did anyway: python -m timeit -s "d = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3}" "[(y, x) for x, y in d.items()]" 1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.527 usec per loop python -m timeit -s "d = {'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3}" "zip(d.values(), d.keys())" 1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.685 usec per loop
    – jamylak
    Jul 31, 2012 at 12:15
  • @jamylak -- running your tests, I get faster list-comps as well. (1.4 usec vs 1.72 usec python 2.7.3, OS-X) and 1.38 usec vs. 1.65 usec on python 2.6.4)
    – mgilson
    Jul 31, 2012 at 12:19
  • I tried a new test where zip is faster for a larger dict: python -m timeit -s "d = dict(zip(range(20), range(20)))" "zip(d.values(), d.keys())" 1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.5 usec per loop python -m timeit -s "d = dict(zip(range(20), range(20)))" "[(y, x) for x, y in d.items()]" 100000 loops, best of 3: 2.39 usec per loop
    – jamylak
    Jul 31, 2012 at 12:20

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