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I have a class with a dull repeating pattern on their functions and I wanted to turn this pattern into a decorator. But the thing is that this decorator must access some attributes of the current instance, so I wanted to turn it into a method in this class. I'm having some problems with that.

So, this is similar to what I want:

class DullRepetitiveClass:
    def __init__(self, nicevariable):
        self.nicevariable = nicevariable

    def mydecorator(self, myfunction):
        def call(*args, **kwargs):
            print "Hi! The value of nicevariable is %s"%(self.nicevariable,)
            return myfunction(*args, **kwargs)
        return call

    @mydecorator            #Here, comment (1) below.
    def somemethod(self, x):
        return x + 1

(1) Here is the problem. I want to use the DullRepetitiveClass.mydecorator method to decorate the somemethod method. But I have no idea how to use the method from the current instance as the decorator.

Is there a simple way of doing this?

EDIT: Ok, the answer is quite obvious. As Sven puts it below, the decorator itself just transform the method. The method itself should deal with all things concerning the instance:

def mydecorator(method):
    def call(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print "Hi! The value of nicevariable is %s"%(self.nicevariable,)
        return method(self, *args, **kwargs)
    return call


class DullRepetitiveClass:
    def __init__(self, nicevariable):
        self.nicevariable = nicevariable

    @mydecorator            
    def somemethod(self, x):
        return x + 1
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  • 1
    Please fix your indentation. Also note that your code does not contain any class methods. Jul 31, 2012 at 12:57
  • Are you asking how to pass a different instance other than self to mydecorator as it decorates somemethod?
    – kojiro
    Jul 31, 2012 at 13:00
  • Oops. Copying from vim and pasting to the browser can be a pain sometimes... Jul 31, 2012 at 13:00
  • Although not accessing the instance, using a callable class as a decorator then enables state to be saved in the class between invocations. This doesn't answer this question but may give a lead to someone coming across this question for another purpose.
    – NeilG
    Apr 28, 2021 at 5:58

1 Answer 1

18

The decorator gets only one parameter – the function or method it decorates. It does not get passed an instance as self parameter – at the moment the decorator is called, not even the class has been created, let alone an instance of the class. The instance will be passed as first argument to the decorated function, so you should include self as first parameter in the parameter list of call().

I don't see the necessity to include the decorator in the class scope. You can do this, but you can just as well have it at module scope.

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  • 2
    What if your decorator needs to use class members? Or is that just a bad idea / pattern?
    – aaronlevin
    Jul 31, 2012 at 14:07
  • @weirdcanada: Since the class has not yet been created at the time the decorator is called, you cannot access its members in an ordinary fashion. You can do some hacks to work around this (things like passing locals() as parameter to the decorator), but they are rather non-obvious, and I can't think of a good reason to do this. Jul 31, 2012 at 14:19
  • I have an example of such a case. Let me find it.
    – aaronlevin
    Jul 31, 2012 at 15:04
  • OK, I had a @property called maxima and another called minima. When they were called, though, I needed to check if they had been calculated. Rather than writing that logic twice, I wrote a wrapper that basically started with if self.new_values is None and then calculated the maxima and minima accordingly, setting self.new_values to False when it was done. I was kind of uncomfortable with it in the beginning, as I defined def new_values_for_extrema_validator(method) and then defined the wrapper within as def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs). So, it references self within.
    – aaronlevin
    Jul 31, 2012 at 15:08
  • 1
    @weirdcanada: What you did is exactly what I suggested in my answer. You are only accessing instance members inside the wrapper function, which is fine. My last comment was regarding accessing class members inside the decorator function, which is something completely different. (I'll also write a minor comment to your gist.) Aug 1, 2012 at 10:16

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