884
  1. How do I return a base64 encoded string given a string?

  2. How do I decode a base64 encoded string into a string?

  • 4
    If this is a "sharing the knowledge" question and answer, I think we're looking for something a bit more in-depth. Also a quick search of SO turns up: stackoverflow.com/a/7368168/419 – Kev Aug 1 '12 at 1:46
  • 1
    @Gnark Any string is encoded by a certain underlying bit-encoding schema. Be it ASCII, UTF7, UTF8, .... The question posed is at best incomplete. – Lorenz Lo Sauer Dec 4 '13 at 21:17
  • 2
    Ask yourself do you really need to do this? Remember base64 is primarily intended for representing binary data in ASCII, for storing in a char field in a database or sending via email (where new lines could be injected). Do you really want to take character data, convert it to bytes, then convert it back to character data, this time unreadable and with no hint of what the original encoding was ? – bbsimonbb Apr 14 '16 at 8:22
  • Why should we care about the original encoding? We encode the string into the bytes using UTF8 representation, which can represent all the possible string characters. We then serialize that data and on the other end we deserialize that data and we reconstruct the same string that we originally had (string object doesn't hold the information about encoding used anyway). So why is there any concern related to the encoding used? We can consider it like a proprietary way of representing the serialized data, which we shouldn't be interested at anyway. – Mladen B. Mar 12 '19 at 11:08
1663

Encode

public static string Base64Encode(string plainText) {
  var plainTextBytes = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(plainText);
  return System.Convert.ToBase64String(plainTextBytes);
}

Decode

public static string Base64Decode(string base64EncodedData) {
  var base64EncodedBytes = System.Convert.FromBase64String(base64EncodedData);
  return System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(base64EncodedBytes);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 41
    Null checks for input strings in both functions and the solution is perfect :) – Sverrir Sigmundarson Mar 29 '14 at 23:05
  • 22
    @SverrirSigmundarson: That or make them extension methods. – T.J. Crowder Dec 30 '14 at 12:38
  • 73
    @SverrirSigmundarson - Why do a null check? He's not the one dereferencing the input string. Null checks should prevent NullReferenceException in your own code, not somebody else's. – ken Feb 2 '15 at 18:44
  • 16
    @ken And somebody else will say "you should only expose errors in your own code, not somebody else's", invoking the principle of least surprise, spiced with "fail early" and "proper encapsulation". Sometimes this means wrapping errors of lower-level components, sometimes something else entirely. In this case, I'll agree that wrapping a deref error is definitely dubious (plus we're all slowly agreeing to the fact that null as a concept is a bit of a hack to begin with), but we can still see some effects otherwise: the parameter name given in the exception might not be correct if left unchecked. – tne Aug 19 '15 at 8:57
  • 6
    return System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(base64EncodedBytes, 0, base64EncodedBytes.Length); for windows phone 8 – steveen zoleko Dec 9 '15 at 17:26
46

I'm sharing my implementation with some neat features:

  • uses Extension Methods for Encoding class. Rationale is that someone may need to support different types of encodings (not only UTF8).
  • Another improvement is failing gracefully with null result for null entry - it's very useful in real life scenarios and supports equivalence for X=decode(encode(X)).

Remark: Remember that to use Extension Method you have to (!) import the namespace with using keyword (in this case using MyApplication.Helpers.Encoding).

Code:

namespace MyApplication.Helpers.Encoding
{
    public static class EncodingForBase64
    {
        public static string EncodeBase64(this System.Text.Encoding encoding, string text)
        {
            if (text == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            byte[] textAsBytes = encoding.GetBytes(text);
            return System.Convert.ToBase64String(textAsBytes);
        }

        public static string DecodeBase64(this System.Text.Encoding encoding, string encodedText)
        {
            if (encodedText == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            byte[] textAsBytes = System.Convert.FromBase64String(encodedText);
            return encoding.GetString(textAsBytes);
        }
    }
}

Usage example:

using MyApplication.Helpers.Encoding; // !!!

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Test1();
            Test2();
        }

        static void Test1()
        {
            string textEncoded = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.EncodeBase64("test1...");
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(textEncoded == "dGVzdDEuLi4=");

            string textDecoded = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.DecodeBase64(textEncoded);
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(textDecoded == "test1...");
        }

        static void Test2()
        {
            string textEncoded = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.EncodeBase64(null);
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(textEncoded == null);

            string textDecoded = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.DecodeBase64(textEncoded);
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(textDecoded == null);
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Returning null in case of null is a very inconsistent behaviour. No other .net API that works with strings does that. – t3chb0t Jun 22 '18 at 6:10
  • 4
    @t3chb0t feel free to adjust it to your needs. As the way it's presented here was adjusted to ours. This is not a public API ;) – andrew.fox Jun 22 '18 at 9:35
  • 1
    Don't you now have to send 2 variables to the other party in your communication (to whom you're sending base64 encoded data)? You need to send both the encoding used and the actual base64 data? Isn't it easier if you use a convention on both sides to use the same encoding? That way you'd only have to send base64 data, right? – Mladen B. Mar 12 '19 at 11:12
38

Based on the answers by Andrew Fox and Cebe, I turned it around and made them string extensions instead of Base64String extensions.

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string ToBase64(this string text)
    {
        return ToBase64(text, Encoding.UTF8);
    }

    public static string ToBase64(this string text, Encoding encoding)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
        {
            return text;
        }

        byte[] textAsBytes = encoding.GetBytes(text);
        return Convert.ToBase64String(textAsBytes);
    }

    public static bool TryParseBase64(this string text, out string decodedText)
    {
        return TryParseBase64(text, Encoding.UTF8, out decodedText);
    }

    public static bool TryParseBase64(this string text, Encoding encoding, out string decodedText)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
        {
            decodedText = text;
            return false;
        }

        try
        {
            byte[] textAsBytes = Convert.FromBase64String(text);
            decodedText = encoding.GetString(textAsBytes);
            return true;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            decodedText = null;
            return false;
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I would add a ParseBase64(this string text, Encoding encoding, out string decodedText) (to populate the exception if needed, and call that on the TryParseBase64 – João Antunes Sep 19 '19 at 9:19
22

A slight variation on andrew.fox answer, as the string to decode might not be a correct base64 encoded string:

using System;

namespace Service.Support
{
    public static class Base64
    {
        public static string ToBase64(this System.Text.Encoding encoding, string text)
        {
            if (text == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            byte[] textAsBytes = encoding.GetBytes(text);
            return Convert.ToBase64String(textAsBytes);
        }

        public static bool TryParseBase64(this System.Text.Encoding encoding, string encodedText, out string decodedText)
        {
            if (encodedText == null)
            {
                decodedText = null;
                return false;
            }

            try
            {
                byte[] textAsBytes = Convert.FromBase64String(encodedText);
                decodedText = encoding.GetString(textAsBytes);
                return true;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                decodedText = null;
                return false;   
            }
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
13

You can use below routine to convert string to base64 format

public static string ToBase64(string s)
{
    byte[] buffer = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(s);
    return System.Convert.ToBase64String(buffer);
}

Also you can use very good online tool OnlineUtility.in to encode string in base64 format

| improve this answer | |
  • Online tools don't help in this situation -- He's asking how to CODE IT. I often wonder why people say "Check out this online tool!", because the OP didn't ask for an online tool :D – Momoro Oct 29 '19 at 3:19
9
    using System;
    using System.Text;

    public static class Base64Conversions
    {
        public static string EncodeBase64(this string text, Encoding encoding = null)
        { 
            if (text == null) return null;

            encoding = encoding ?? Encoding.UTF8;
            var bytes = encoding.GetBytes(text);
            return Convert.ToBase64String(bytes);
        }

        public static string DecodeBase64(this string encodedText, Encoding encoding = null)
        {
            if (encodedText == null) return null;

            encoding = encoding ?? Encoding.UTF8;
            var bytes = Convert.FromBase64String(encodedText);
            return encoding.GetString(bytes);
        }
    }

Usage

    var text = "Sample Text";
    var base64 = text.EncodeBase64();
    base64 = text.EncodeBase64(Encoding.UTF8); //or with Encoding
| improve this answer | |
4

URL safe Base64 Encoding/Decoding

public static class Base64Url
{
    public static string Encode(string text)
    {
        return Convert.ToBase64String(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(text)).TrimEnd('=').Replace('+', '-')
            .Replace('/', '_');
    }

    public static string Decode(string text)
    {
        text = text.Replace('_', '/').Replace('-', '+');
        switch (text.Length % 4)
        {
            case 2:
                text += "==";
                break;
            case 3:
                text += "=";
                break;
        }
        return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(Convert.FromBase64String(text));
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Question wasn't about URL Encoding, but still helpful.. – Momoro Mar 21 at 4:45
  • Whoops, posted it under the wrong question – juliushuck Mar 24 at 16:31
  • No problem, it's still interesting to see how to encode / decode a URL :) – Momoro Mar 24 at 23:55
3

You can display it like this:

var strOriginal = richTextBox1.Text;

byte[] byt = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(strOriginal);

// convert the byte array to a Base64 string
string strModified = Convert.ToBase64String(byt);

richTextBox1.Text = "" + strModified;

Now, converting it back.

var base64EncodedBytes = System.Convert.FromBase64String(richTextBox1.Text);

richTextBox1.Text = "" + System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(base64EncodedBytes);
MessageBox.Show("Done Converting! (ASCII from base64)");

I hope this helps!

| improve this answer | |
1

For those that simply want to encode/decode individual base64 digits:

public static int DecodeBase64Digit(char digit, string digit62 = "+-.~", string digit63 = "/_,")
{
    if (digit >= 'A' && digit <= 'Z') return digit - 'A';
    if (digit >= 'a' && digit <= 'z') return digit + (26 - 'a');
    if (digit >= '0' && digit <= '9') return digit + (52 - '0');
    if (digit62.IndexOf(digit) > -1)  return 62;
    if (digit63.IndexOf(digit) > -1)  return 63;
    return -1;
}

public static char EncodeBase64Digit(int digit, char digit62 = '+', char digit63 = '/')
{
    digit &= 63;
    if (digit < 52)
        return (char)(digit < 26 ? digit + 'A' : digit + ('a' - 26));
    else if (digit < 62)
        return (char)(digit + ('0' - 52));
    else
        return digit == 62 ? digit62 : digit63;
}

There are various versions of Base64 that disagree about what to use for digits 62 and 63, so DecodeBase64Digit can tolerate several of these.

| improve this answer | |

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