14

This question already has an answer here:

I have a string in the following format:

I'm\nNed\nNederlander
I'm\nLucky\nDay
I'm\nDusty\nBottoms

I would like to move this to an array of strings line by line such that:

$ echo "${ARRAY[0]}"
I'm\nNed\nNederlander

$ echo "${ARRAY[1]}"
I'm\nLucky\nDay

$ echo "${ARRAY[2]}"
I'm\nDusty\nBottoms

However, I'm running into problems with the "\n" characters within the string itself. They are represented in the string as two separate characters, the backslash and the 'n', but when I try to do the array split they get interpreted as newlines. Thus typical string splitting with IFS does not work.

For example:

$ read -a ARRAY <<< "$STRING"
$ echo "${#ARRAY[@]}"   # print number of elements
2

$ echo "${ARRAY[0]}"
I'mnNednNederla

$ echo "${ARRAY[1]}"
der

marked as duplicate by Trevor Boyd Smith, tripleee bash Jun 17 '16 at 16:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • BTW, does anybody know how to fix SE's terrible formatting of the code above? – Cory Klein Jul 31 '12 at 17:51
  • The "terrible formatting" is due to the apostrophes being interpreted as single quotes (which it expects to be balanced). Use the "block quote" tags instead of "code" tags. – twalberg Jul 31 '12 at 17:59
26

By default, the read builtin allows \ to escape characters. To turn off this behavior, use the -r option. It is not often you will find a case where you do not want to use -r.

string="I'm\nNed\nNederlander
I'm\nLucky\nDay
I'm\nDusty\nBottoms"

arr=()
while read -r line; do
   arr+=("$line")
done <<< "$string"

In order to do this in one-line (like you were attempting with read -a), actually requires mapfile in bash v4 or higher:

mapfile -t arr <<< "$string"
  • yeah for mapfile oneliner :) – Ben Marten May 12 '17 at 20:22
12

mapfile is more elegant, but it is possible to do this in one (ugly) line with read (useful if you're using a version of bash older than 4):

IFS=$'\n' read -d '' -r -a arr <<< "$string"
  • Indeed, and -d option seems crucial to make it work – Vic Seedoubleyew Apr 27 '16 at 12:22
  • One caveat I did not know about when I posted this: the exit status will be non-zero, since a here string will never end with a null character like read -d '' will expect. – chepner Jul 25 '16 at 13:44

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