18

According to this online book, the volatile keyword in C# does not protect against reordering Write operations followed by Read operations. It gives this example in which both a and b can end up being set to 0, despite x and y being volatile:

class IfYouThinkYouUnderstandVolatile
{
  volatile int x, y;

  void Test1()        // Executed on one thread
  {
    x = 1;            // Volatile write (release-fence)
    int a = y;        // Volatile read (acquire-fence)
    ...
  }

  void Test2()        // Executed on another thread
  {
    y = 1;            // Volatile write (release-fence)
    int b = x;        // Volatile read (acquire-fence)
    ...
  }
}

This seems to fit with what the specification says in 10.5.3:

A read of a volatile field is called a volatile read. A volatile read has “acquire semantics”; that is, it is guaranteed to occur prior to any references to memory that occur after it in the instruction sequence.

A write of a volatile field is called a volatile write. A volatile write has “release semantics”; that is, it is guaranteed to happen after any memory references prior to the write instruction in the instruction sequence.

What is the reason for this? Is there a use case in which we don't mind Write-Read operations being reordered?

7

Volatile does not guarantee reads and writes are not re-ordered, it only guarantees that reads get the most up-to-date value (non-cached).

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/x13ttww7%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

The system always reads the current value of a volatile object at the point it is requested, even if the previous instruction asked for a value from the same object. Also, the value of the object is written immediately on assignment.

The volatile modifier is usually used for a field that is accessed by multiple threads without using the lock statement to serialize access. Using the volatile modifier ensures that one thread retrieves the most up-to-date value written by another thread.

Whenever you have multiple dependent operations, you need to use some other synchronization mechanism. Usually use lock, it's easiest and only creates performance bottlenecks when abused or in very extreme situations.

  • Clear and understandable answer – Eric Jul 31 '12 at 20:34
  • @Eric, thanks. :-) – Samuel Neff Jul 31 '12 at 20:35
  • 1
    "Volatile does not guarantee reads and writes are not re-ordered, it only guarantees that reads get the most up-to-date value (non-cached)." I don't think that's right. From the spec: "all threads will observe volatile writes performed by any other thread in the order they were performed" (taken from stackoverflow.com/q/10589565 ) – Max Barraclough May 17 '18 at 15:02
2

Maybe too late to answer ... but I was looking around and saw this. Volatile-read is actually a call to a method similar to the following:

public static int VolatileRead(ref int address)
{
    int num = address;
    Thread.MemoryBarrier();
    return num;
}

And Volatile-write is like this:

public static int VolatileWrite(ref int address, int value)
{
    Thread.MemoryBarrier();
    adrdress = value;
}

The instruction MemoryBarrier(); is the one preventing from reordering.MemoryBarrier(); ensures that intructions before are executed before intructions after. When VW then VR, you will have:

Thread.MemoryBarrier();
adrdress = value; //this line may be reordered with the one bellow
int num = address;//this line may be reordered with the one above
Thread.MemoryBarrier();
return num;
  • 2
    As your answer illustrates, the answer to this question is actually quite simple: if anyone need sequentially consistency, one can always insert additional Thread.MemoryBarrier() where required. – rwong May 14 '16 at 6:45
2

Preventing volatile write with volatile read reordering will be quite expensive on x86/x64 arch. That's because of the write optimization called store buffers. Java went this way and volatile writes in Java are effectively full memory barriers at CPU instructions level.

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