42
{
  vendors: [
    {
      vendor: {
        id: 367,
        name: "Kuhn-Pollich",
        company_id: 1,
      }
    },
    {
      vendor: {
        id: 374,
        name: "Sawayn-Hermann",
        company_id: 1,
      }
  }]
}

I have a Vendor object that can properly be deserialized from a single "vendor" json, but I want to deserialize this into a Vendor[], I just can't figure out how to make Jackson cooperate. Any tips?

  • 5
    This is invalid JSON. vendors has as value an array, which has a single object, and the single object has a 'vendor' property, which is followed by a bare top-level opject. i.e. the second vendor object has no associated property in the single object that is in the array. Furthermore, the property names aren't strings, they need to be quoted in JSON. I'm guessing that you've typed the JSON in wrong? A good answer will depend on knowing what kind of JSOn you're actually working with. – pb2q Jul 31 '12 at 19:24
  • Sorry, let me correct the JSON -- Should be fixed now – Sam Stern Jul 31 '12 at 19:50
  • You're not able (or don't want) to have a Vendors class that contains a List<Vendor>? – hertzsprung Jul 31 '12 at 20:05
  • I am but the issue is the fact that the Vendor object is a nested as the "vendor" property of each object in the array, rather than being the object itself. This means I'd have to have a Vendors class with a list of VendorWrapper, where each VendorWrapper contains a single Vendor. I have this setup now, but it's less than ideal. – Sam Stern Aug 1 '12 at 4:09
27

Your data is problematic in that you have inner wrapper objects in your array. Presumably your Vendor object is designed to handle id, name, company_id, but each of those multiple objects are also wrapped in an object with a single property vendor.

I'm assuming that you're using the Jackson Data Binding model.

If so then there are two things to consider:

The first is using a special Jackson config property. Jackson - since 1.9 I believe, this may not be available if you're using an old version of Jackson - provides UNWRAP_ROOT_VALUE. It's designed for cases where your results are wrapped in a top-level single-property object that you want to discard.

So, play around with:

objectMapper.configure(SerializationConfig.Feature.UNWRAP_ROOT_VALUE, true);

The second is using wrapper objects. Even after discarding the outer wrapper object you still have the problem of your Vendor objects being wrapped in a single-property object. Use a wrapper to get around this:

class VendorWrapper
{
    Vendor vendor;

    // gettors, settors for vendor if you need them
}

Similarly, instead of using UNWRAP_ROOT_VALUES, you could also define a wrapper class to handle the outer object. Assuming that you have correct Vendor, VendorWrapper object, you can define:

class VendorsWrapper
{
    List<VendorWrapper> vendors = new ArrayList<VendorWrapper>();

    // gettors, settors for vendors if you need them
}

// in your deserialization code:
ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
JsonNode rootNode = mapper.readValue(jsonInput, VendorsWrapper.class); 

The object tree for VendorsWrapper is analogous to your JSON:

VendorsWrapper:
    vendors:
    [
        VendorWrapper
            vendor: Vendor,
        VendorWrapper:
            vendor: Vendor,
        ...
    ]

Finally, you might use the Jackson Tree Model to parse this into JsonNodes, discarding the outer node, and for each JsonNode in the ArrayNode, calling:

mapper.readValue(node.get("vendor").getTextValue(), Vendor.class);

That might result in less code, but it seems no less clumsy than using two wrappers.

  • Thank you, this is how I was doing it I just hoped there was a better way. I'll mark it as correct. – Sam Stern Aug 1 '12 at 19:10
  • I'd also like to see a solution using something like UNWRAP_ROOT_VALUES, only 1 level deeper, but I don't think it's possible. Another option of course is to use a custom deserializer, and just add hooks to look for the actual objects you're interested in and discard everything else, or to use the Jackson Tree Model approach, throw away the top-level JsonNode, and take the JsonNodes that wrap your Vendors, call getTextValue, and pass that to mapper.readValue. Jackson really gives you a surfeit of options. – pb2q Aug 1 '12 at 19:16
32

Here is a rough but more declarative solution. I haven't been able to get it down to a single annotation, but this seems to work well. Also not sure about performance on large data sets.

Given this JSON:

{
    "list": [
        {
            "wrapper": {
                "name": "Jack"
            }
        },
        {
            "wrapper": {
                "name": "Jane"
            }
        }
    ]
}

And these model objects:

public class RootObject {
    @JsonProperty("list")
    @JsonDeserialize(contentUsing = SkipWrapperObjectDeserializer.class)
    @SkipWrapperObject("wrapper")
    public InnerObject[] innerObjects;
}

and

public class InnerObject {
    @JsonProperty("name")
    public String name;
}

Where the Jackson voodoo is implemented like:

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@JacksonAnnotation
public @interface SkipWrapperObject {
    String value();
}

and

public class SkipWrapperObjectDeserializer extends JsonDeserializer<Object> implements
        ContextualDeserializer {
    private Class<?> wrappedType;
    private String wrapperKey;

    public JsonDeserializer<?> createContextual(DeserializationContext ctxt,
            BeanProperty property) throws JsonMappingException {
        SkipWrapperObject skipWrapperObject = property
                .getAnnotation(SkipWrapperObject.class);
        wrapperKey = skipWrapperObject.value();
        JavaType collectionType = property.getType();
        JavaType collectedType = collectionType.containedType(0);
        wrappedType = collectedType.getRawClass();
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public Object deserialize(JsonParser parser, DeserializationContext ctxt)
            throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        ObjectNode objectNode = mapper.readTree(parser);
        JsonNode wrapped = objectNode.get(wrapperKey);
        Object mapped = mapIntoObject(wrapped);
        return mapped;
    }

    private Object mapIntoObject(JsonNode node) throws IOException,
            JsonProcessingException {
        JsonParser parser = node.traverse();
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        return mapper.readValue(parser, wrappedType);
    }
}

Hope this is useful to someone!

  • +1 for mapIntoObject(JsonNode)... so if you want to use readValue with a JsonNode just pass its traverse() – rakslice Oct 24 '14 at 20:01
  • 2
    Works well: one minor simplification I'd suggest is ObjectMapper.convertValue(), which can be used to replace 3 lines in mapIntoObject: return mapper.convertValue(node, wrappedType); – StaxMan Dec 18 '14 at 5:06
  • 1
    @Patrick, I tried running this example code. getting NPE in SkipWrapperObjectDeserializer at wrappedType = collectedType.getRawClass(); in createContextual() method. Can you please help me to fix this. Thanks. – Sanjeet A Jul 30 '16 at 23:06
11

@Patrick I would improve your solution a bit

@Override
public Object deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt)
        throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {        
    ObjectNode objectNode = jp.readValueAsTree();
    JsonNode wrapped = objectNode.get(wrapperKey);
    JsonParser parser = node.traverse();
    parser.setCodec(jp.getCodec());
    Vendor mapped = parser.readValueAs(Vendor.class);
    return mapped;
}

It works faster :)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.