60

The problem is that after I added the new class, the error came up when I did build the solution. What can be wrong?

In Form1, I don’t have any code yet.

I just added a new class:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using OpenHardwareMonitor.Hardware;

namespace OpenHardwareMonitorReport
{

    class Program
    {

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Computer computer = new Computer();
            computer.Open();

            var temps = new List<decimal>();
            foreach (var hardware in computer.Hardware)
            {
                if (hardware.HardwareType != HardwareType.CPU)
                    continue;
                hardware.Update();
                foreach (var sensor in hardware.Sensors)
                {
                    if (sensor.SensorType != SensorType.Temperature)
                    {
                        if (sensor.Value != null)
                            temps.Add((decimal)sensor.Value);
                    }
                }
            }

            foreach (decimal temp in temps)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(temp);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Then I see file Program.cs and the error on Main():

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace NvidiaTemp
{
    static class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }
    }
}

Error 2  Program 'D:\C-Sharp\NvidiaTemp\NvidiaTemp\NvidiaTemp\obj\x86\Debug\NvidiaTemp.exe' has more than one entry point defined: 'NvidiaTemp.Program.Main()'. Compile with /main to specify the type that contains the entry point. D:\C-Sharp\NvidiaTemp\NvidiaTemp\NvidiaTemp\Program.cs  14  21  NvidiaTemp
2
  • 1
    You have two Main now.
    – L.B
    Jul 31, 2012 at 19:43
  • 4
    It may or may not be the case here, but using NUnit can under certain circumstances add an implicit main() entry (even though this second main() is not anywhere in the source code) and result in this symptom. See e.g. Jesse Q's answer. Jul 31, 2020 at 22:49

12 Answers 12

90

I experienced this issue after adding an xUnit test class to my .NET Core 2.1 project.

The following article gives a detailed explanation of why, and provided the answer that worked for me - here.

Basically, the compiler automatically generates a Main for the new class. You can provide a directive in your .csproj file to keep this from happening:

<GenerateProgramFile>false</GenerateProgramFile>

Add this to your <PropertyGroup> section and recompile.

6
  • 1
    I ran into this problem with NUnit (.NET Core 3.1 on Linux). Jul 31, 2020 at 22:53
  • 4
    This occurred for me when I added the NuGet package Microsoft.NET.Test.Sdk
    – User 10
    Nov 22, 2020 at 19:23
  • 1
    If you are using vscode, use dotnet new xunit -n Tests to create a new xunit test project. Thi will save your time by adding the right configurations in your .csproj file.
    – leaner12
    May 19, 2021 at 22:15
  • 1
    I also get the CS0017 error message. I added the <GenerateProgramFile>false</GenerateProgramFile> to my .cs.proj file but still get the CS0017. Also, if the compiler automatically generates a Main for a new class, does that mean we don't have to explicitely write Main? I removed Main to test this out and the compiler complained until I put it back in. Oct 31, 2021 at 21:34
  • So, the problem is, that at compile time it has generated two or more exe files?
    – carloswm85
    Jun 17, 2022 at 20:20
35

Others have pointed out that you have two static void Main methods. There are two easy fixes for this, one obvious and one that hasn't been specifically mentioned yet:

  1. Rename one to anything else e.g. Main1, NotMain, etc.
  2. To set the /main compiler option mentioned by Habib, just right click on the project node in Solution Explorer, select Properties, and in the Application section select the "Startup object" in the dropdown.

With solution 2, you can have identical Main(string[] args) signatures in different classes without the compiler whining.

5
  • 6
    finally someone pointed out how to adjust /main using Visual Studio (... who's seriously compiling their C# projects at the command line?) Nov 10, 2015 at 20:45
  • Great answer but I found I also had to restart VS before my new class would appear under the startup object selection.
    – PeterJ
    Oct 4, 2018 at 12:05
  • Should I select a new Startup Object in project properties each time I create a new class with its own Main method? In other words, when I create a new class in the project with a Main method, should I designate that class as the startup object to avoid the CS0017 error? I read that the compiler automatically generates a Main for a new class, which should mean we don't have to explicitely write Main. I removed Main to test this out and the compiler complained until I put it back in. I'm new to C#/VSCode 2019 so I may be missing something. I did not experience the CS0017 issue in Java/Eclipse. Oct 31, 2021 at 22:35
  • @AnneBailly, you should ideally only have one Main method in your project. When you write a console application, there can be only one entry point to the executable (startup method), and that is what the Main method denotes. That is why, when you have more than one, you have to tell the compiler which one to use as the entry point. If you add other classes, you should use different method names, unless you intend to switch back and forth between different startup behaviors each time you compile the app (which would be a weird approach).
    – Paul Smith
    Nov 1, 2021 at 22:19
  • Solution 2 worked perfect for me, although, I didn't have a choice it was simply app
    – Spinstaz
    Sep 25, 2022 at 13:25
23

A C# program can only have one Program.Main(). Main is the first method run when the program starts, so the compiler needs to know which one is the real one, and it can't if you have two.

It looks like you're making a Windows application. You should either add code to the existing main, or add it to an event handler triggered by your main form.

16

Having two Main methods is just fine. If you receive the error you mentioned then you need only to tell Visual Studio which one you'd like to use.

  1. Right-click on your project to view the properties.
  2. Go to the Application tab and choose the entry point you desire from the Startup object dropdown.

Here's an example where I have two entry points depending on how I want to dev-test the assembly.

Enter image description here

Enter image description here Enter image description here

1
  • Should I select a new Startup Object in project properties each time I create a new class with its own Main method? In other words, when I create a new class in the project with a Main method, should I designate that class as the startup object to avoid the CS0017 error? I read that the compiler automatically generates a Main for a new class, which should mean we don't have to explicitely write Main. I removed Main to test this out and the compiler complained until I put it back in. I'm new to C#/VSCode 2019 so I may be missing something. I did not experience the CS0017 issue in Java/Eclipse. Oct 31, 2021 at 22:35
10

A .NET program should have only one static Main method.

You have two, and the compiler doesn't know which one to use.

Rename the pasted one, unless you want it to be the entry point to the application (in which case, rename the other), or compile the application passing using the /main switch specifying which of the Main methods to use.

See Main() and Command-Line Arguments (C# Programming Guide) on MSDN for more detail:

The Main method is the entry point of a C# console application or windows application. (Libraries and services do not require a Main method as an entry point.). When the application is started, the Main method is the first method that is invoked.

There can only be one entry point in a C# program. If you have more than one class that has a Main method, you must compile your program with the /main compiler option to specify which Main method to use as the entry point. For more information, see /main (C# Compiler Options).

(emphasis mine)

7

An entry point may be chosen by add StartupObject into your .cspoj

<StartupObject>MyApplication.Core.Program</StartupObject>

See -main (C# Compiler Options)

2
  • This worked for me because I did not add an xUnit thing to my project.
    – Bradyo
    Oct 30, 2022 at 14:34
  • This one worked for me using VS on Mac by following exactly what Maksym said.
    – K. hervey
    Jun 27, 2023 at 21:08
6

You have two Main methods, and that is why you are getting this error.

From MSDN - Main Method

There can only be one entry point in a C# program. If you have more than one class that has a Main method, you must compile your program with the /main compiler option to specify which Main method to use as the entry point.

4

When you add a new class in your project and also you write the Main method, and when you run your code at that time it shows the error like "More than one Main method found", then you just need to:

  1. Right click on your project name which is shown in "Solution Explorer" then
  2. go into Application and in the Startup object dropdown menu choose your class which you want to run. If you don't find your class name in it, then simply just restart your IDE and again follow the above steps.
4

Did you recently add unit testing (XUnit) to your project?
Then this is the reason for you error message. You can read about the details in this blog post.

The solution is simple:
Edit your .csproj file and add a GenerateProgramFile property with value false to a general PropertyGroup (one that has no conditions):

Example:

<PropertyGroup>
  <TargetFramework>netcoreapp2.2</TargetFramework>
  <IsPackable>false</IsPackable>
  <GenerateProgramFile>false</GenerateProgramFile>
</PropertyGroup>
3

If you have fixed the error and Visual Studio still gives you error message, it's worth to remove output folders (by default "bin" and "obj") and then rebuild the project. In my case just clicking on "rebuild" did not help.

1
  • Alternatively, rename the two folders (to make an investigation of why exactly this happened possible). E.g. the contents of the new and old folders could be compared. Jul 31, 2020 at 22:47
0

My demo project had the Microsoft.NET.Test.Sdk Nuget package left over from some tinkering.

Removing this Nuget package resolved the error even though I had no tests or test projects in the solution.

0

Program 'output file name' has more than one entry point defined. Compile with /main to specify the type that contains the entry point.

A program can only have one Main method.

To resolve this error, you can either delete all Main methods in your code, except one, or you can use the StartupObject compiler option to specify which Main method you want to use.

https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/misc/cs0017

Just go to "StartupObject compiler option" and select your program as startup object.

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