7

From Effective Java 2ed Item 2:

telescoping constructor pattern, in which you provide a constructor with only the required parameters, another with a single optional parameter, a third with two optional parameters, and so on, culminating in a constructor with all the optional parameter

Can I do the same in C++? I tried somthing like this:

MyClass::MyClass(QWidget *parent)
{   
    MyClass(NULL, NULL, NULL, parent);
}

MyClass::MyClass(QString title, QWidget *parent) 
{

    MyClass(title, NULL, NULL, parent);
}

MyClass::MyClass(QString title, QString rightButton, QWidget *parent)
{


    MyClass(title, NULL, rightButton, parent);
}



MyClass::MyClass(QString titleLabel, QString leftButtonLabel, QString rightButtonLabel, QWidget *parent)
: QWidget(parent)
{
      // construct the object
}

but it does not work. Any hint?

I am really new in C++ field so.. sorry for the newbee question

3
  • yes, you can. it's easy. You even show how in the last constructor there. Jul 31, 2012 at 20:45
  • Note that your code is merely constructing a temporary MyClass in the constructor, since it's not in the member initializer list Jul 31, 2012 at 20:46
  • 3
    Just use default arguments for the parameters, done.
    – Xeo
    Jul 31, 2012 at 20:46

3 Answers 3

9

This is called delegating constructor in c++11 and is done like so:

MyClass::MyClass(QWidget *parent)
    : MyClass(NULL, NULL, NULL, parent)
{   
}

whereas your version produces a temporary that gets immediately destroyed.

6
  • illegal member initialization: 'MyClass' is not a base or member, on visual studio 2005
    – Blackbelt
    Jul 31, 2012 at 20:48
  • 1
    @blackbelt this is only legal since c++11, use a modern compiler. Jul 31, 2012 at 20:51
  • @blackbelt Visual Studio does not support this C++11 feature even in 2010 SP1 ... they might catch up in VS2012.
    – AJG85
    Jul 31, 2012 at 20:51
  • @AJG85: VS2012 is already in pre-release, and no more features are added, so no.
    – Xeo
    Jul 31, 2012 at 20:53
  • @blackbelt he did caveat it with being a C++11 feature, thus it would be expected to not work with Visual Studio 2005. Even with the latest version of Visual Studio delegating constructors are not planned to be supported (blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2011/09/12/10209291.aspx). Jul 31, 2012 at 20:55
6

The easiest way is to supply default values to the constructor parameters.

If that doesn't work, you typically create an Init method that gets called by each constructor so that the code isn't repeated.

0
1
MyClass::MyClass(QWidget *parent)
{   
    MyClass(NULL, NULL, NULL, parent);
}

should be

MyClass::MyClass(QWidget *parent) :
    MyClass(NULL, NULL, NULL, parent)
{   
}

etc.

2
  • In C++11, that is. C++03 doesn't have delegating ctors.
    – Xeo
    Jul 31, 2012 at 20:46
  • @Xeo When I posted this I was thinking derived constructor so I deleted, then was reminded by your comment that it will be supported in C++11. Thanks.
    – Lou
    Jul 31, 2012 at 22:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.