354

I have an image, and I want to set it a specific width and height (in pixels)

But If I set width and height using css (width:150px; height:100px), image will be stretched, and It may be ugly.

How to Fill images to a specific size using CSS, and not stretching it?

Example of fill and stretching image:

Original Image:

Original

Stretched Image:

Stretched

Filled Image:

Filled

Please note that in the Filled image example above: first, image is resized to 150x255 (maintained aspect ratio), and then, it cropped to 150x100.

11 Answers 11

337

If you want to use the image as a CSS background, there is an elegant solution. Simply use cover or contain in the background-size CSS3 property.

<div class="container"></div>​

.container {
    width: 150px;
    height: 100px;
    background-image: url("http://i.stack.imgur.com/2OrtT.jpg");
    background-size: cover;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-position: 50% 50%;
}​

While cover will give you a scaled up image, contain will give you a scaled down image. Both will preserve the pixel aspect ratio.

http://jsfiddle.net/uTHqs/ (using cover)

http://jsfiddle.net/HZ2FT/ (using contain)

This approach has the advantage of being friendly to Retina displays as per Thomas Fuchs' quick guide.

It's worth mentioning that browser support for both attributes excludes IE6-8.

  • 1
    Since you can resize the image purely in the CSS, this allows you to use a large image and then scale it down according to each device's pixel density by using media queries. – depa Aug 1 '12 at 16:59
  • 1
    Could you explain why in this case the background-position seems to indicate the position of the center of the image rather than it's top-left corner? Is it a consequence of background-size: cover? – matteo Mar 1 '14 at 18:47
  • 1
    mine just covers the entire DIV expanding the image. I don't see the curve ending. – SearchForKnowledge Oct 15 '14 at 15:26
  • 5
    Not as SEO/reader friendly if you want to add an ALT attribute... – AD Henrique Oct 19 '16 at 19:37
  • 2
    'background-position' could be set to 'center center' too. eg.: .container { ... background-position: center center; } – Leo Ribeiro Feb 21 '17 at 14:56
466

You can use the css property object-fit.

<img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/2OrtT.jpg" class="cover" width="242" height="363" />

.cover {
  object-fit: cover;
  width: 50px;
  height: 100px;
}

See example here

There's a polyfill for IE: https://github.com/anselmh/object-fit

  • 10
    Interesting to see that this can be done with img tags too (not only background-image method as described in the answer above). Thank you :) – Mahdi Ghiasi Jun 2 '15 at 12:38
  • 41
    When considering this as an option, keep in mind that object-fit isn't supported in very many browsers. – joshreesjones Sep 19 '15 at 21:15
  • 2
    Unfortunately background-size is rarely a viable solution in my projects. You're less likely to receive any SEO benefit and cannot provide an ALT tag, caption, etc to accompany the image where you may want to provide additional context for screen readers. – Markus Dec 11 '15 at 17:42
  • 3
    This is cool, but there is no IE support. None of the polyfills work anymore. – Jake Sep 7 '16 at 2:00
  • 2
    Just using object-fit: cover; does it. Thanks a lot – Luka Mar 6 '17 at 20:30
55

The only real way is to have a container around your image and use overflow:hidden:

HTML

<div class="container"><img src="ckk.jpg" /></div>

CSS

.container {
    width: 300px;
    height: 200px;
    display: block;
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.container img {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100%;
}

It's a pain in CSS to do what you want and center the image, there is a quick fix in jquery such as:

var conHeight = $(".container").height();
var imgHeight = $(".container img").height();
var gap = (imgHeight - conHeight) / 2;
$(".container img").css("margin-top", -gap);

http://jsfiddle.net/x86Q7/2/

  • 1
    Thanks. it worked, but it crops the image from top. (see this: jsfiddle.net/x86Q7 ) Isn't there any way to crop image from center? – Mahdi Ghiasi Aug 1 '12 at 10:50
  • 1
    @MahdiGhiasi: Change top and left properties in .container img css!! – Ali Ben Messaoud Aug 1 '12 at 10:53
  • I may set margin-top of image by for example 50px (see this: jsfiddle.net/x86Q7/1 ), but How to crop it from real center? (Without jQuery?) – Mahdi Ghiasi Aug 1 '12 at 10:56
  • 2
    Ahh sorry didnt see your comment but i added the jquery just incase :) – Dominic Green Aug 1 '12 at 10:58
  • 1
    Great solution! For me the vertical fill was more important than the horizontal, so I just had to change "width: 100%" to "height: 100%" for the '.container img' class. Thank you! – deebs Dec 18 '14 at 15:11
45

Actually, this is just a derivation from the most upvoted answer of this question (Not the accepted one).

There are three differences:

  1. There is NO need to provide the height and width attributes on the image element because they will be overridden by the style.
    so it is enough to write something like this.

    <img class="cover" src="url to img ..."  />
    
  2. Providing width:100% on the style.
    This is helpful if you are using bootstrap and want the image to stretch all the available width.

  3. Specifying the height property is optional, You can remove/keep it as you need

    .cover {
       object-fit: cover;
       width: 100%;
       /*height: 300px;  optional, you can remove it, but in my case it was good */
    }
    
  • 1
    Thank you. It works like charm! – machariadev Jul 19 '17 at 18:34
  • Why didn't you just edit the other answer? – Chloe Oct 1 '17 at 4:19
  • 1
    Exactly what I was looking for. – francis lanthier May 5 '18 at 20:56
  • it wont work in ie browser – Hemanth SP Feb 27 at 5:09
  • 1
    You need a kiss! – Qin Wang May 24 at 15:58
25

CSS solution no JS and no background image:

Method 1 "margin auto" ( IE8+ - NOT FF!):

div{
  width:150px; 
  height:100px; 
  position:relative;
  overflow:hidden;
}
div img{
  position:absolute; 
  top:0; 
  bottom:0; 
  margin: auto;
  width:100%;
}
<p>Original:</p>
<img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/2OrtT.jpg" alt="image"/>

<p>Wrapped:</p>
<div>
  <img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/2OrtT.jpg" alt="image"/>
</div>

http://jsfiddle.net/5xjr05dt/

Method 2 "transform" ( IE9+ ):

div{
  width:150px; 
  height:100px; 
  position:relative;
  overflow:hidden;
}

div img{
  position:absolute; 
  width:100%;
  top: 50%;
  -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
  -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}
<p>Original:</p>
<img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/2OrtT.jpg" alt="image"/>

<p>Wrapped:</p>
<div>
  <img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/2OrtT.jpg" alt="image"/>
</div>

http://jsfiddle.net/5xjr05dt/1/

Method 2 can be used to center an image in a fixed width / height container. Both can overflow - and if the image is smaller than the container it will still be centered.

http://jsfiddle.net/5xjr05dt/3/

Method 3 "double wrapper" ( IE8+ - NOT FF! ):

.outer{
  width:150px; 
  height:100px; 
  margin: 200px auto; /* just for example */
  border: 1px solid red; /* just for example */
  /* overflow: hidden;	*/ /* TURN THIS ON */
  position: relative;
}
.inner { 
    border: 1px solid green; /* just for example */
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    margin: auto;
    display: table;
    left: 50%;
}
.inner img {
    display: block;
    border: 1px solid blue; /* just for example */
    position: relative;
    right: 50%;
    opacity: .5; /* just for example */
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="inner">
     <img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/2OrtT.jpg" alt="image"/>
  </div>
</div>

http://jsfiddle.net/5xjr05dt/5/

Method 4 "double wrapper AND double image" ( IE8+ ):

.outer{
  width:150px; 
  height:100px; 
  margin: 200px auto; /* just for example */
  border: 1px solid red; /* just for example */
  /* overflow: hidden;	*/ /* TURN THIS ON */
  position: relative;
}
.inner { 
    border: 1px solid green; /* just for example */
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    bottom: 0;
    display: table;
    left: 50%;
}
.inner .real_image {
    display: block;
    border: 1px solid blue; /* just for example */
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 50%;
    right: 50%;
    opacity: .5; /* just for example */
}

.inner .placeholder_image{
  opacity: 0.1; /* should be 0 */
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="inner">
    <img class="real_image" src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/2OrtT.jpg" alt="image"/>
    <img class="placeholder_image"  src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/2OrtT.jpg" alt="image"/>
  </div>
</div>

http://jsfiddle.net/5xjr05dt/26/

  • Method 1 has slightly better support - you have to set the width OR height of image!
  • With the prefixes method 2 also has decent support ( from ie9 up ) - Method 2 has no support on Opera mini!
  • Method 3 uses two wrappers - can overflow width AND height.
  • Method 4 uses a double image ( one as placeholder ) this gives some extra bandwidth overhead, but even better crossbrowser support.

Method 1 and 3 don't seem to work with Firefox

  • This is the only one that actually works (minus js solutions). Thanks! – Jake Sep 7 '16 at 1:59
  • It is limited to overflowing either height or width, but an interesting solution. – Jake Sep 7 '16 at 2:21
  • 1
    @Jake - It is possible to overflow width AND height with method 2 above - see my updated answer with the extra fiddle. – J.T. Houtenbos Sep 7 '16 at 12:23
  • Yeah. It is definitely a great answer. I will fool around with it some more. It was a little quirky for an image wider than taller that needed to be responsive, but there are lots of applications for this. – Jake Sep 7 '16 at 15:44
  • 1
    @Jake - Cool - I found a 3th method to do horizontal centering. I extended this method to also support vertical centering. I will post my addition as a 3th method above. It seems it is IE7+ proof ( even lower possibly ). Here is the original answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/3300660/… – J.T. Houtenbos Sep 7 '16 at 17:55
9

Another solution is to put the image in a container with the desired width and height. Using this method you would not have to set the image as a background image of an element.

Then you can do this with an img tag and just set a max-width and max-height on the element.

CSS:

.imgContainer {
    display: block;
    width: 150px; 
    height: 100px;
}

.imgContainer img {
    max-width: 100%;
    max-height: 100%;
}

HTML:

<div class='imgContainer'>
    <img src='imagesrc.jpg' />
</div>

Now when you change the size of the container the image will automatically grow as large as it can without going outside the bounds or distorting.

If you want to center the image vertically and horizontally you can change the container css to:

.imgContainer {
    display: table-cell;
    width: 150px; 
    height: 100px;
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

Here is a JS Fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/9kUYC/2/

  • It's not the same as cover in CSS, where one of the resulting dimensions is always beyond 100% (or equal in edge case) – Miroshko Dec 7 '14 at 16:19
  • No, this solution makes sure that it's never stretched beyond 100%, which is what part of the question was about. They didn't want to have the image distort or grow beyond the original dimensions. – earl3s Dec 8 '14 at 18:52
  • 2
    The question was "How to Fill" with an example of filled image, which is obviously cropped. – Miroshko Dec 10 '14 at 15:52
  • But what if you need the image to be responsive? Defining a specific width and height isn't going to work 😕 – Ricardo Zea Aug 30 '17 at 5:03
  • Ricardo, that's true. I don't believe his question was about a responsive image size though. Just about an image filling a container properly. – earl3s Aug 31 '17 at 6:48
5

Building off of @Dominic Green's answer using jQuery, here is a solution that should work for images that are either wider than they are high or higher than they are wide.

http://jsfiddle.net/grZLR/4/

There is probably a more elegant way of doing the JavaScript, but this does work.

function myTest() {
  var imgH = $("#my-img").height();
  var imgW = $("#my-img").width();
  if(imgW > imgH) {
    $(".container img").css("height", "100%");
    var conWidth = $(".container").width();
    var imgWidth = $(".container img").width();
    var gap = (imgWidth - conWidth)/2;
    $(".container img").css("margin-left", -gap);
  } else {
    $(".container img").css("width", "100%");
    var conHeight = $(".container").height();
    var imgHeight = $(".container img").height();
    var gap = (imgHeight - conHeight)/2;
    $(".container img").css("margin-top", -gap);
  }
}
myTest();
4

I helped build a jQuery plugin called Fillmore, which handles the background-size: cover in browsers that support it, and has a shim for those that don't. Give it a look!

3

Try something like this: http://jsfiddle.net/D7E3E/4/

Using a container with overflow: hidden

EDIT: @Dominic Green beat me.

  • Thanks. it worked, but it crops the image from top. (see this: jsfiddle.net/x86Q7 ) Isn't there any way to crop image from center? – Mahdi Ghiasi Aug 1 '12 at 10:52
  • Might be rather difficult with CSS, this is the best I could come up with jsfiddle.net/D7E3E/5 – woutr_be Aug 1 '12 at 10:56
  • Yes, to get it centered correctly, you should use jQuery, might be a lot easier. – woutr_be Aug 1 '12 at 10:59
3

This will Fill images to a specific size, without stretching it or without cropping it

img{
    width:150px;  //your requirement size
    height:100px; //your requirement size

/*Scale down will take the necessary specified space that is 150px x 100px without stretching the image*/
    object-fit:scale-down;
}
3

I think it's quite late for this answer. Anyway hope this will help somebody in the future. I faced the problem positioning the cards in angular. There are cards displayed for array of events. If image width of the event is big for card, the image should be shown by cropping from two sides and height of 100 %. If image height is long, images' bottom part is cropped and width is 100 %. Here is my pure css solution for this:

enter image description here

HTML:

 <span class="block clear img-card b-b b-light text-center" [ngStyle]="{'background-image' : 'url('+event.image+')'}"></span>

CSS

.img-card {
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background-size: cover;
background-position: 50% 50%;
width: 100%;
overflow: hidden;
}
  • i can't fathom how this works but it does. You need to position the span absolutely top:0;right:0;bottom:0;left:0 inside the relatively positioned parent to dimension it. – Mike Jan 22 at 17:19
  • Thank you for feedback dear Mike, I'm happy if this was helpful. Do you want me to update the answer with your comment? – Nodirabegimxonoyim Jan 24 at 5:53

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