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I've made a program that I need to license before selling it to customers. Since I'm not sure, that it will gain me at least the cost of commercial licensing software, I would not like to buy one.

So I'm looking for advice on how to implement licensing feature with following logic:

  • All license keys are validated on server side each time application starts (no licensing info is stored at userside except the license number).
  • There is only one application running with one license key at the same time.

What I do not know is how to protect my program from simple decompiling/disassembling and just removing a call to check license? Or making own server that will make a response true on each license? How does such security normally made?

I've searched for free SDKs or something like that, but could not find anything. I'll be very thankful for your help!

P.S: I do not aspire to make the system "indestructible", but I would like to receive the protection that is more expensive to crack than paying $5.10 for a copy of the program.

P.P.S: Sorry for my bad english.

closed as off topic by Mahmoud Gamal, Druid, Richard Everett, E.J. Brennan, Anuraj Aug 1 '12 at 11:19

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    Have you considered that this means your users can only start the application when they have a working internet connection? This could rule out a lot of laptop/mobile users, and anyone with poor connectivity. Also, what have you tried so far? Your question shows a lack of research, and that often leads to questions being closed or ignored. – Dan Puzey Aug 1 '12 at 11:00
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    msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc164108.aspx explains how strongly naming the assembly thwarts assembly tampering. For web service you should consider using a server certificate which has to be validated by client before accepting the response. But, this would prevent all the offline users from using it. – Ramesh Aug 1 '12 at 11:25
  • Sorry, thought, that the question was clear. So far I've written a webservice and a client for checking a license - an it works fine, but its really simple to turn off such defense... So ive asked if somebody can give an advice on how to protect from this. As soon as my App is online-game automatisation - my users all must have a good internet connection, so it wont be a problem with realtime check. Obfuscation is ok, but after obfuscation i still can catch event in debugger and jump over it... – CodeDemen Aug 1 '12 at 11:26
  • I am not sure why this is voted for closure. To me it is a legitimate question to understand how to protect an application. It has 6+ votes and only one negative vote. I am voting for this to be reopened. – Ramesh Aug 1 '12 at 11:29
  • @CodeDemen - If you protect your webservice with Server certificate and use https, it cannot be tampered without noticed. Same if your assemblies are using strong name and code signing. – Ramesh Aug 1 '12 at 11:32
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What I do not know is how to protect my program from simple decompiling/disassembling and just removing a call to check license? Or making own server that will make a response true on each license? How does such security normally made?

You are confusing licensing and obfuscation. To prevent the above, you will need to obfuscate your exes and dlls using an obfuscator.

Since I'm not sure, that it will gain me at least the cost of commercial licensing software, I would not like to buy one.

IMHO you are much better off focusing and spending time on your actual software than in developing a licensing scheme from scratch (re-inventing the wheel as they say).

If you do open up to paid solutions, take a look at CryptoLicensing (for licensing and copy-protection) and Crypto Obfuscator (for obfuscation and code-protection).

DISCLAIMER: I work for LogicNP Software, the developer of above mentioned products.

  • IMO, Obfuscation will not help as people have patched the exes in the past by looking at the assembly code. Obfuscation is just going to make it a bit harder to understand the logic – Ramesh Aug 1 '12 at 11:07
  • I was writing a VERY similar post but you were faster. Completely agree with this and no one should re-invent the wheel,especially in the security domain. – Jean-François Côté Aug 1 '12 at 11:07
  • Yes, nothing is 100% crack-proof, but some protection is better then none! – logicnp Aug 1 '12 at 11:08
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(Sorry can't comment on other people's posts???)

It depends on what your application is doing.

I'm currently faced with the same problem as you. I'm going for a log in system, simply fetch and compare to what's in the database. If not present do not launch app. Not that I need more, the application relies on my database and without it it is useless.

Then they can spend a couple of hours figuring out what my database looks like based on what they see on queries or practically rewriting my entire product. I'm going to spend little on in app security. The only protection I wish to have is not to show my server's data.

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    Here the solution is pretty simple - you need to write a web service with authentification support, but not send queries to your database directly. Then call from you app to webservice with licensekey(or login-password-as you wish) and get responses from it - its about 2 classes more for you to write and guarantees you nobody will gain access to you database data. – CodeDemen Aug 1 '12 at 11:40
  • @CodeDemen would you mind pointing me to a nice tutorial/explanation about this? – AmazingDreams Aug 1 '12 at 11:53
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    No problem! WS Auth example and WS DB Connectivity – CodeDemen Aug 1 '12 at 12:02
  • @CodeDemen thank you :) – AmazingDreams Aug 1 '12 at 12:10

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