I am currently using this type of SQL on MySQL to insert multiple rows of values in one single query:

INSERT INTO `tbl` (`key1`,`key2`) VALUES ('r1v1','r1v2'),('r2v1','r2v2'),...

On the readings on PDO, the use prepared statements should give me a better security than static queries.

I would therefore like to know whether it is possible to generate "inserting multiple rows of values by the use of one query" using prepared statements.

If yes, may I know how can I implement it?

  • careful with a lot of the answers for $stmt->execute($data); php.net/manual/en/… Basically all of the params are passed validated as strings. Just loop through the data after building the query, and manually bindValue or bindParam passing type as third-argument. – MrMesees Aug 2 '17 at 18:10

19 Answers 19

up vote 119 down vote accepted

Multiple Values Insert with PDO Prepared Statements

Inserting multiple values in one execute statement. Why because according to this page it is faster than regular inserts.

$datafields = array('fielda', 'fieldb', ... );

$data[] = array('fielda' => 'value', 'fieldb' => 'value' ....);
$data[] = array('fielda' => 'value', 'fieldb' => 'value' ....);

more data values or you probably have a loop that populates data.

With prepared inserts you need to know the fields you're inserting to, and the number of fields to create the ? placeholders to bind your parameters.

insert into table (fielda, fieldb, ... ) values (?,?...), (?,?...)....

That is basically how we want the insert statement to look like.

Now, the code:

function placeholders($text, $count=0, $separator=","){
    $result = array();
    if($count > 0){
        for($x=0; $x<$count; $x++){
            $result[] = $text;
        }
    }

    return implode($separator, $result);
}

$pdo->beginTransaction(); // also helps speed up your inserts.
$insert_values = array();
foreach($data as $d){
    $question_marks[] = '('  . placeholders('?', sizeof($d)) . ')';
    $insert_values = array_merge($insert_values, array_values($d));
}

$sql = "INSERT INTO table (" . implode(",", $datafields ) . ") VALUES " .
       implode(',', $question_marks);

$stmt = $pdo->prepare ($sql);
try {
    $stmt->execute($insert_values);
} catch (PDOException $e){
    echo $e->getMessage();
}
$pdo->commit();

Although in my test, there was only a 1 sec difference when using multiple inserts and regular prepared inserts with single value.

  • 4
    A typo, in the explanation above it mentions $datafields although $datafield is used in $sql. Thus copy paste would result in error. Please do rectify. Thanks for this solution though. – pal4life Feb 14 '12 at 0:48
  • 1
    Used this for a while then noticed that values with single quotes in them aren't escaped properly. Using double quotes on implosion works like a charm for me: $a[] = '("' . implode(",", $question_marks) . '", NOW())'; – qwertzman Sep 24 '12 at 11:53
  • 1
    array_merge seems more expensive than just using a array_push. – K2xL Oct 17 '13 at 18:22
  • 7
    When you say "there was only a 1 sec difference", how many rows a data were you inserting? 1 sec is pretty significant depending on the context. – Kevin Dice Jun 2 '15 at 23:03
  • 2
    Optimization: No point in calling placeholders() over and over again. Call it once before the loop with sizeof($datafields) and append the result string to $question_marks[] inside the loop. – AVIDeveloper Jun 28 '16 at 7:44

Same answer as Mr. Balagtas, slightly clearer...

Recent versions MySQL and PHP PDO do support multi-row INSERT statements.

SQL Overview

The SQL will look something like this, assuming a 3-column table you'd like to INSERT to.

INSERT INTO tbl_name
            (colA, colB, colC)
     VALUES (?, ?, ?), (?, ?, ?), (?, ?, ?) [,...]

ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE works as expected even with a multi-row INSERT; append this:

ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE colA = VALUES(colA), colB = VALUES(colB), colC = VALUES(colC)

PHP Overview

Your PHP code will follow the usual $pdo->prepare($qry) and $stmt->execute($params) PDO calls.

$params will be a 1-dimensional array of all the values to pass to the INSERT.

In the above example, it should contain 9 elements; PDO will use every set of 3 as a single row of values. (Inserting 3 rows of 3 columns each = 9 element array.)

Implementation

Below code is written for clarity, not efficiency. Work with the PHP array_*() functions for better ways to map or walk through your data if you'd like. Whether you can use transactions obviously depends on your MySQL table type.

Assuming:

  • $tblName - the string name of the table to INSERT to
  • $colNames - 1-dimensional array of the column names of the table These column names must be valid MySQL column identifiers; escape them with backticks (``) if they are not
  • $dataVals - mutli-dimensional array, where each element is a 1-d array of a row of values to INSERT

Sample Code

// setup data values for PDO
// memory warning: this is creating a copy all of $dataVals
$dataToInsert = array();

foreach ($dataVals as $row => $data) {
    foreach($data as $val) {
        $dataToInsert[] = $val;
    }
}

// (optional) setup the ON DUPLICATE column names
$updateCols = array();

foreach ($colNames as $curCol) {
    $updateCols[] = $curCol . " = VALUES($curCol)";
}

$onDup = implode(', ', $updateCols);

// setup the placeholders - a fancy way to make the long "(?, ?, ?)..." string
$rowPlaces = '(' . implode(', ', array_fill(0, count($colNames), '?')) . ')';
$allPlaces = implode(', ', array_fill(0, count($dataVals), $rowPlaces));

$sql = "INSERT INTO $tblName (" . implode(', ', $colNames) . 
    ") VALUES " . $allPlaces . " ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE $onDup";

// and then the PHP PDO boilerplate
$stmt = $pdo->prepare ($sql);

try {
   $stmt->execute($dataToInsert);
} catch (PDOException $e){
   echo $e->getMessage();
}

$pdo->commit();
  • 6
    That is really too bad that PDO handles it this way, there are some very elegant ways to do this in other DB drivers. – Jonathon May 6 '13 at 2:00
  • This setups the placeholders even more tersely, making $rowPlaces no longer necessary: $allPlaces = implode(',', array_fill(0, count($dataVals), '('.str_pad('', (count($colNames)*2)-1, '?,').')')); – Phil Jun 19 '14 at 4:03
  • Works perfect. I would add to this answer the need to ensure the uniqueness of the (combination of) indexes in the table. Like in ALTER TABLE votes ADD UNIQUE unique_index(user, email, address); – Giuseppe Apr 2 '17 at 15:22
  • Awesome! BTW, using array_push($dataToInsert, ...array_values($dataVals)); will be much faster then foreach ($dataVals as $row => $data) {} – Anis Aug 21 '17 at 9:29

For what it is worth, I have seen a lot of users recommend iterating through INSERT statements instead of building out as a single string query as the selected answer did. I decided to run a simple test with just two fields and a very basic insert statement:

<?php
require('conn.php');

$fname = 'J';
$lname = 'M';

$time_start = microtime(true);
$stmt = $db->prepare('INSERT INTO table (FirstName, LastName) VALUES (:fname, :lname)');

for($i = 1; $i <= 10; $i++ )  {
    $stmt->bindParam(':fname', $fname);
    $stmt->bindParam(':lname', $lname);
    $stmt->execute();

    $fname .= 'O';
    $lname .= 'A';
}


$time_end = microtime(true);
$time = $time_end - $time_start;

echo "Completed in ". $time ." seconds <hr>";

$fname2 = 'J';
$lname2 = 'M';

$time_start2 = microtime(true);
$qry = 'INSERT INTO table (FirstName, LastName) VALUES ';
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?)";

$stmt2 = $db->prepare($qry);
$values = array();

for($j = 1; $j<=10; $j++) {
    $values2 = array($fname2, $lname2);
    $values = array_merge($values,$values2);

    $fname2 .= 'O';
    $lname2 .= 'A';
}

$stmt2->execute($values);

$time_end2 = microtime(true);
$time2 = $time_end2 - $time_start2;

echo "Completed in ". $time2 ." seconds <hr>";
?>

While the overall query itself took milliseconds or less, the latter (single string) query was consistently 8 times faster or more. If this was built out to say reflect an import of thousands of rows on many more columns, the difference could be enormous.

  • 3
    point well proved – mireille raad Aug 3 '13 at 23:03
  • 1 upvote for brevity and clarity – Stephen Adelakun Dec 11 '15 at 15:24
  • @JM4 - great idea to put 10 rows directly in one execution. But how can I insert thousands of rows when they are stored in an object like JSON? My code below works perferctly. But how can I adjust it to insert 10 rows in one execution? ` foreach($json_content as $datarow) { $id = $datarow[id]; $date = $datarow[date]; $row3 = $datarow[row3]; $row4 = $datarow[row4]; $row5 = $datarow[row5]; $row6 = $datarow[row6]; $row7= $datarow[row7]; // now execute $databaseinsert->execute(); } // end of foreach ` – Peter Sep 14 '17 at 15:57
  • @JM4 - ... and my second question is: "why is there no bind_param statement in the second import routine"? – Peter Sep 14 '17 at 17:39
  • Wouldn't you have to loop twice? You would also have to dynamically generate the (?,?), right? – NoobishPro Feb 4 at 2:26

The Accepted Answer by Herbert Balagtas works well when the $data array is small. With larger $data arrays the array_merge function becomes prohibitively slow. My test file to create the $data array has 28 cols and is about 80,000 lines. The final script took 41s to complete.

Using array_push() to create $insert_values instead of array_merge() resulted in a 100X speed up with execution time of 0.41s.

The problematic array_merge():

$insert_values = array();

foreach($data as $d){
 $question_marks[] = '('  . placeholders('?', sizeof($d)) . ')';
 $insert_values = array_merge($insert_values, array_values($d));
}

To eliminate the need for array_merge(), you can build the following two arrays instead:

//Note that these fields are empty, but the field count should match the fields in $datafields.
$data[] = array('','','','',... n ); 

//getting rid of array_merge()
array_push($insert_values, $value1, $value2, $value3 ... n ); 

These arrays can then be used as follows:

function placeholders($text, $count=0, $separator=","){
    $result = array();
    if($count > 0){
        for($x=0; $x<$count; $x++){
            $result[] = $text;
        }
    }

    return implode($separator, $result);
}

$pdo->beginTransaction();

foreach($data as $d){
 $question_marks[] = '('  . placeholders('?', sizeof($d)) . ')';
}

$sql = "INSERT INTO table (" . implode(",", array_keys($datafield) ) . ") VALUES " . implode(',', $question_marks);

$stmt = $pdo->prepare ($sql);
try {
    $stmt->execute($insert_values);
} catch (PDOException $e){
    echo $e->getMessage();
}
$pdo->commit();
  • 3
    In PHP 5.6 you can do array_push($data, ...array_values($row)) instead of $data = array_merge($data, array_values($row));. Much faster. – mpen Feb 5 '15 at 18:08
  • Why 5.6 ? Documentation doesn't say anything about 5.6, array_push() is available even in php 4. – ZurabWeb Sep 20 '15 at 20:02
  • 1
    @Piero it is PHP 5.6+ only code not because of the use of array_push(), but because @Mark is using argument unpacking. Notice the ...array_values() call there? – mariano.iglesias Sep 30 '15 at 13:16
  • @mariano.iglesias array_values() is as well available in php 4. Not sure if that's what you mean by argument unpacking. – ZurabWeb Sep 30 '15 at 21:14
  • 1
    @Piero, Argument unpacking is a feature introduces in PHP 5.6. It's a way to provide multiple arguments as an array. Check here - php.net/manual/en/… – Anis Aug 21 '17 at 5:41

That's simply not the way you use prepared statements.

It is perfectly okay to insert one row per query because you can execute one prepared statement multiple times with different parameters. In fact that is one of the greatest advantages as it allows you to insert you a great number of rows in an efficient, secure and comfortable manner.

So it maybe possible to implement the scheme you proposing, at least for a fixed number of rows, but it is almost guaranteed that this is not really what you want.

  • 1
    Can you suggest a better way to insert multiple rows into a table? – Crashthatch Jul 4 '14 at 15:51
  • @Crashthatch: Just do it the naive way: Setup the prepared statement once, then execute it for each row with different values for the bound parameters. That's the second approach in Zyk's answer. – sebasgo Jul 7 '14 at 7:53
  • 2
    The purpose you mentioned for prepared statement is right. But, using multi -insert is another technique to improve insert speed and it can be used with prepared statement too. In my experience, while migrating 30 million row data using PDO prepared statement, I saw multi-insert was 7-10 times faster then grouped single insert in transactions. – Anis Aug 21 '17 at 5:50
  • 1
    Absolutely agree with Anis. I have 100k rows and get a huge speed increase with muli row inserts. – Kenneth Mar 11 at 9:09

Two possible approaches:

$stmt = $pdo->prepare('INSERT INTO foo VALUES(:v1_1, :v1_2, :v1_3),
    (:v2_1, :v2_2, :v2_3),
    (:v2_1, :v2_2, :v2_3)');
$stmt->bindValue(':v1_1', $data[0][0]);
$stmt->bindValue(':v1_2', $data[0][1]);
$stmt->bindValue(':v1_3', $data[0][2]);
// etc...
$stmt->execute();

Or:

$stmt = $pdo->prepare('INSERT INTO foo VALUES(:a, :b, :c)');
foreach($data as $item)
{
    $stmt->bindValue(':a', $item[0]);
    $stmt->bindValue(':b', $item[1]);
    $stmt->bindValue(':c', $item[2]);
    $stmt->execute();
}

If the data for all the rows are in a single array, I would use the second solution.

  • 9
    in the latter aren't you then making several (possibly thousands) of separate execute calls instead of combining into one statement? – JM4 Jan 31 '12 at 20:24
  • @JM4, are you suggesting $stmt->execute(); should be outside the foreach loop? – bafromca Aug 8 '13 at 16:13
  • @bafromca - Yes I am. See my answer above with upvotes. On a pure insert statement there is no reason i can logically come up with that it can't be a single statement. One call, one execute. In fact, my answer from early 2012 could be improved even further - something I will do later on when I have some more time. If you start throwing in Insert / update/ delete combinations, that is a different story. – JM4 Aug 8 '13 at 20:13

A shorter answer: flatten the array of data ordered by columns then

//$array = array( '1','2','3','4','5', '1','2','3','4','5');
$arCount = count($array);
$rCount = ($arCount  ? $arCount - 1 : 0);
$criteria = sprintf("(?,?,?,?,?)%s", str_repeat(",(?,?,?,?,?)", $rCount));
$sql = "INSERT INTO table(c1,c2,c3,c4,c5) VALUES$criteria";

When inserting a 1,000 or so records you don't want to have to loop through every record to insert them when all you need is a count of the values.

Here's a class I wrote do multiple inserts with purge option:

<?php

/**
 * $pdo->beginTransaction();
 * $pmi = new PDOMultiLineInserter($pdo, "foo", array("a","b","c","e"), 10);
 * $pmi->insertRow($data);
 * ....
 * $pmi->insertRow($data);
 * $pmi->purgeRemainingInserts();
 * $pdo->commit();
 *
 */
class PDOMultiLineInserter {
    private $_purgeAtCount;
    private $_bigInsertQuery, $_singleInsertQuery;
    private $_currentlyInsertingRows  = array();
    private $_currentlyInsertingCount = 0;
    private $_numberOfFields;
    private $_error;
    private $_insertCount = 0;

    function __construct(\PDO $pdo, $tableName, $fieldsAsArray, $bigInsertCount = 100) {
        $this->_numberOfFields = count($fieldsAsArray);
        $insertIntoPortion = "INSERT INTO `$tableName` (`".implode("`,`", $fieldsAsArray)."`) VALUES";
        $questionMarks  = " (?".str_repeat(",?", $this->_numberOfFields - 1).")";

        $this->_purgeAtCount = $bigInsertCount;
        $this->_bigInsertQuery    = $pdo->prepare($insertIntoPortion.$questionMarks.str_repeat(", ".$questionMarks, $bigInsertCount - 1));
        $this->_singleInsertQuery = $pdo->prepare($insertIntoPortion.$questionMarks);
    }

    function insertRow($rowData) {
        // @todo Compare speed
        // $this->_currentlyInsertingRows = array_merge($this->_currentlyInsertingRows, $rowData);
        foreach($rowData as $v) array_push($this->_currentlyInsertingRows, $v);
        //
        if (++$this->_currentlyInsertingCount == $this->_purgeAtCount) {
            if ($this->_bigInsertQuery->execute($this->_currentlyInsertingRows) === FALSE) {
                $this->_error = "Failed to perform a multi-insert (after {$this->_insertCount} inserts), the following errors occurred:".implode('<br/>', $this->_bigInsertQuery->errorInfo());
                return false;
            }
            $this->_insertCount++;

            $this->_currentlyInsertingCount = 0;
            $this->_currentlyInsertingRows = array();
        }
        return true;
    }

    function purgeRemainingInserts() {
        while ($this->_currentlyInsertingCount > 0) {
            $singleInsertData = array();
            // @todo Compare speed - http://www.evardsson.com/blog/2010/02/05/comparing-php-array_shift-to-array_pop/
            // for ($i = 0; $i < $this->_numberOfFields; $i++) $singleInsertData[] = array_pop($this->_currentlyInsertingRows); array_reverse($singleInsertData);
            for ($i = 0; $i < $this->_numberOfFields; $i++) array_unshift($singleInsertData, array_pop($this->_currentlyInsertingRows));

            if ($this->_singleInsertQuery->execute($singleInsertData) === FALSE) {
                $this->_error = "Failed to perform a small-insert (whilst purging the remaining rows; the following errors occurred:".implode('<br/>', $this->_singleInsertQuery->errorInfo());
                return false;
            }
            $this->_currentlyInsertingCount--;
        }
    }

    public function getError() {
        return $this->_error;
    }
}
  • Hello Pierre. Maybe you're not active around here anymore. Nevertheless, I just wanted to point out that my idea for this issue looks nearly identical to yours. Pure coincidence, as I guess there isn't much more to this. I added classes for DELETE- AND UPDATE-Operations, too and involved some ideas from here, afterwards. I just didn't see your class. Please excuse my shameless self promotion here, but I guess it will be of help for someone. Hope this isn't against SO-Rules. Find it here. – user3469861 Aug 2 '17 at 14:55

Here is my simple approach.

    $values = array();
    foreach($workouts_id as $value){
      $_value = "(".$value.",".$plan_id.")";
      array_push($values,$_value);
    }
    $values_ = implode(",",$values);

    $sql = "INSERT INTO plan_days(id,name) VALUES" . $values_."";
    $stmt = $this->conn->prepare($sql);
    $stmt->execute();
  • Working for me, thank you ! – Do Xuan Nguyen May 11 '17 at 7:15
  • 3
    you're defeating the point of using prepared statements. the op is concerned about security in the question On the readings on PDO, the use prepared statements should give me a better security than static queries. – yesitsme Sep 7 '17 at 6:08
  • Just imaging that you have non validated $workouts_id, which can have $values with quite inexpected data. You can't guarantee that maybe not now but in future another developer make this data insecure. So I think quite more right make the query prepared by PDO. – Nikita_kharkov_ua May 31 at 20:54

This is how I did it:

First define the column names you'll use, or leave it blank and pdo will assume you want to use all the columns on the table - in which case you'll need to inform the row values in the exact order they appear on the table.

$cols = 'name', 'middleName', 'eMail';
$table = 'people';

Now, suppose you have a two dimensional array already prepared. Iterate it, and construct a string with your row values, as such:

foreach ( $people as $person ) {
if(! $rowVals ) {
$rows = '(' . "'$name'" . ',' . "'$middleName'" . ',' .           "'$eMail'" . ')';
} else { $rowVals  = '(' . "'$name'" . ',' . "'$middleName'" . ',' . "'$eMail'" . ')';
}

Now, what you just did was check if $rows was already defined, and if not, create it and store row values and the necessary SQL syntax so it will be a valid statement. Note that strings should go inside double quotes and single quotes, so they will be promptly recognized as such.

All it's left to do is prepare the statement and execute, as such:

$stmt = $db->prepare ( "INSERT INTO $table $cols VALUES $rowVals" );
$stmt->execute ();

Tested with up to 2000 rows so far, and the execution time is dismal. Will run some more tests and will get back here in case I have something further to contribute.

Regards.

Since it has not been suggested yet, I'm pretty sure LOAD DATA INFILE is still the fastest way to load data as it disables indexing, inserts all data, and then re-enables the indexes - all in a single request.

Saving the data as a csv should be fairly trivial keeping in mind fputcsv. MyISAM is fastest, but you still get big performance in InnoDB. There are other disadvantages, though so I would go this route if you are inserting a lot of data, and not bother with under 100 rows.

Although an old question all the contributions helped me a lot so here's my solution, which works within my own DbContext class. The $rows parameter is simply an array of associative arrays representing rows or models: field name => insert value.

If you use a pattern that uses models this fits in nicely when passed model data as an array, say from a ToRowArray method within the model class.

Note: It should go without saying but never allow the arguments passed to this method to be exposed to the user or reliant on any user input, other than the insert values, which have been validated and sanitised. The $tableName argument and the column names should be defined by the calling logic; for instance a User model could be mapped to the user table, which has its column list mapped to the model's member fields.

public function InsertRange($tableName, $rows)
{
    // Get column list
    $columnList = array_keys($rows[0]);
    $numColumns = count($columnList);
    $columnListString = implode(",", $columnList);

    // Generate pdo param placeholders
    $placeHolders = array();

    foreach($rows as $row)
    {
        $temp = array();

        for($i = 0; $i < count($row); $i++)
            $temp[] = "?";

        $placeHolders[] = "(" . implode(",", $temp) . ")";
    }

    $placeHolders = implode(",", $placeHolders);

    // Construct the query
    $sql = "insert into $tableName ($columnListString) values $placeHolders";
    $stmt = $this->pdo->prepare($sql);

    $j = 1;
    foreach($rows as $row)
    {
        for($i = 0; $i < $numColumns; $i++)
        {
            $stmt->bindParam($j, $row[$columnList[$i]]);
            $j++;
        }
    }

    $stmt->execute();
}
  • Why the downvote? – Lee Feb 19 '17 at 9:57
  • get rid of a transaction, as it makes no sense to use one for a single query. and as usual, this code is vulnerable to SQL injection or query error. – Your Common Sense Feb 19 '17 at 10:57
  • You're right about the redundant use of transactions for this case, but I don't see how this is vulnerable to SQL injection. It's parameterised so I can only presume you're assuming $tableName is exposed to the user, which it's not, it's in the DAL. Can you expand on your claims? It's not helpful to just say things. – Lee Feb 19 '17 at 12:08
  • well, it's not only a table name but anyway: how can you know whether it will be exposed or not by anyone who would use the code you posted here? – Your Common Sense Feb 19 '17 at 12:12
  • So it's a poster's responsibility to outline every potential use of the code or every source for arguments? Maybe I have higher expectations of people. Would it make you happier if I added a note not to allow the user to have access to $tableName? – Lee Feb 19 '17 at 12:19

You can insert multiple rows in a single query with this function:

function insertMultiple($query,$rows) {
    if (count($rows)>0) {
        $args = array_fill(0, count($rows[0]), '?');

        $params = array();
        foreach($rows as $row)
        {
            $values[] = "(".implode(',', $args).")";
            foreach($row as $value)
            {
                $params[] = $value;
            }
        }

        $query = $query." VALUES ".implode(',', $values);
        $stmt = $PDO->prepare($query);
        $stmt->execute($params);
    }
}

$row is an array of arrays of values. In your case you would call the function with

insertMultiple("INSERT INTO tbl (`key1`,`key2`)",array(array('r1v1','r1v2'),array('r2v1','r2v2')));

This has the benefit that you use prepared statements, while inserting multiple rows with a single query. Security!

This worked for me

    $sql = 'INSERT INTO table(pk_pk1,pk_pk2,date,pk_3) VALUES '; 
    $qPart = array_fill(0, count($array), "(?, ?,UTC_TIMESTAMP(),?)");
 $sql .= implode(",", $qPart);
 $stmt =    DB::prepare('base', $sql);
     $i = 1;
     foreach ($array as $value) 
       { 
       $stmt->bindValue($i++, $value);
       $stmt->bindValue($i++, $pk_pk1);
       $stmt->bindValue($i++, $pk_pk2); 
      $stmt->bindValue($i++, $pk_pk3); 
      } 
    $stmt->execute();

Here is my solution: https://github.com/sasha-ch/Aura.Sql based on auraphp/Aura.Sql library.

Usage example:

$q = "insert into t2(id,name) values (?,?), ... on duplicate key update name=name"; 
$bind_values = [ [[1,'str1'],[2,'str2']] ];
$pdo->perform($q, $bind_values);

Bugreports are welcome.

My real world example to insert all german postcodes into an empty table (to add town names later):

// obtain column template
$stmt = $db->prepare('SHOW COLUMNS FROM towns');
$stmt->execute();
$columns = array_fill_keys(array_values($stmt->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_COLUMN)), null);
// multiple INSERT
$postcode = '01000';// smallest german postcode
while ($postcode <= 99999) {// highest german postcode
    $values = array();
    while ($postcode <= 99999) {
        // reset row
        $row = $columns;
        // now fill our row with data
        $row['postcode'] = sprintf('%05d', $postcode);
        // build INSERT array
        foreach ($row as $value) {
            $values[] = $value;
        }
        $postcode++;
        // avoid memory kill
        if (!($postcode % 10000)) {
            break;
        }
    }
    // build query
    $count_columns = count($columns);
    $placeholder = ',(' . substr(str_repeat(',?', $count_columns), 1) . ')';//,(?,?,?)
    $placeholder_group = substr(str_repeat($placeholder, count($values) / $count_columns), 1);//(?,?,?),(?,?,?)...
    $into_columns = implode(',', array_keys($columns));//col1,col2,col3
    // this part is optional:
    $on_duplicate = array();
    foreach ($columns as $column => $row) {
        $on_duplicate[] = $column;
        $on_duplicate[] = $column;
    }
    $on_duplicate = ' ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE' . vsprintf(substr(str_repeat(', %s = VALUES(%s)', $count_columns), 1), $on_duplicate);
    // execute query
    $stmt = $db->prepare('INSERT INTO towns (' . $into_columns . ') VALUES' . $placeholder_group . $on_duplicate);//INSERT INTO towns (col1,col2,col3) VALUES(?,?,?),(?,?,?)... {ON DUPLICATE...}
    $stmt->execute($values);
}

As you can see its fully flexible. You don't need to check the amount of columns or check on which position your column is. You only need to set the insert data:

    $row['postcode'] = sprintf('%05d', $postcode);

I'm proud of some of the query string constructors as they work without heavy array-functions like array_merge. Especially vsprintf() was a good find.

Finally I needed to add 2x while() to avoid exceeding the memory limit. This depends on your memory limit but at all its a good general solution to avoid problems (and having 10 queries is still much better than 10.000).

test.php

<?php
require_once('Database.php');

$obj = new Database();
$table = "test";

$rows = array(
    array(
    'name' => 'balasubramani',
    'status' => 1
    ),
    array(
    'name' => 'balakumar',
    'status' => 1
    ),
    array(
    'name' => 'mani',
    'status' => 1
    )
);

var_dump($obj->insertMultiple($table,$rows));
?>

Database.php

<?php
class Database 
{

    /* Initializing Database Information */

    var $host = 'localhost';
    var $user = 'root';
    var $pass = '';
    var $database = "database";
    var $dbh;

    /* Connecting Datbase */

    public function __construct(){
        try {
            $this->dbh = new PDO('mysql:host='.$this->host.';dbname='.$this->database.'', $this->user, $this->pass);
            //print "Connected Successfully";
        } 
        catch (PDOException $e) {
            print "Error!: " . $e->getMessage() . "<br/>";
            die();
        }
    }
/* Insert Multiple Rows in a table */

    public function insertMultiple($table,$rows){

        $this->dbh->beginTransaction(); // also helps speed up your inserts.
        $insert_values = array();
        foreach($rows as $d){
            $question_marks[] = '('  . $this->placeholders('?', sizeof($d)) . ')';
            $insert_values = array_merge($insert_values, array_values($d));
            $datafields = array_keys($d);
        }

        $sql = "INSERT INTO $table (" . implode(",", $datafields ) . ") VALUES " . implode(',', $question_marks);

        $stmt = $this->dbh->prepare ($sql);
        try {
            $stmt->execute($insert_values);
        } catch (PDOException $e){
            echo $e->getMessage();
        }
        return $this->dbh->commit();
    }

    /*  placeholders for prepared statements like (?,?,?)  */

    function placeholders($text, $count=0, $separator=","){
        $result = array();
        if($count > 0){
            for($x=0; $x<$count; $x++){
                $result[] = $text;
            }
        }

        return implode($separator, $result);
    }

}
?>
  • Welcome to stackoverflow. Not just the code, please post what your problem and explain. – Prakash Palnati Nov 20 '17 at 9:23
  • basically. it's just an implementation of the code provided in the accepted answer – Your Common Sense Nov 21 '17 at 9:26

Most of the solutions given here to create the prepared query are more complex that they need to be. Using PHP's built in functions you can easily creare the SQL statement without significant overhead.

Given $records, an array of records where each record is itself an indexed array (in the form of field => value), the following function will insert the records into the given table $table, on a PDO connection $connection, using only a single prepared statement. Note that this is a PHP 5.6+ solution because of the use of argument unpacking in the call to array_push:

private function import(PDO $connection, $table, array $records)
{
    $fields = array_keys($records[0]);
    $placeHolders = substr(str_repeat(',?', count($fields)), 1);
    $values = [];
    foreach ($records as $record) {
        array_push($values, ...array_values($record));
    }

    $query = 'INSERT INTO ' . $table . ' (';
    $query .= implode(',', $fields);
    $query .= ') VALUES (';
    $query .= implode('),(', array_fill(0, count($records), $placeHolders));
    $query .= ')';

    $statement = $connection->prepare($query);
    $statement->execute($values);
}
  • 1
    This code should never be used as it is vulnerable to SQL injection – Your Common Sense Sep 30 '15 at 13:23

Array union should be even faster than array_push, so something like:

$cumulativeArray += $rowArray; 

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