102

How to select all rows in one table that do not appear on another?

Table1:

+-----------+----------+------------+
| FirstName | LastName | BirthDate  |
+-----------+----------+------------+
| Tia       | Carrera  | 1975-09-18 |
| Nikki     | Taylor   | 1972-03-04 |
| Yamila    | Diaz     | 1972-03-04 |
+-----------+----------+------------+

Table2:

+-----------+----------+------------+
| FirstName | LastName | BirthDate  |
+-----------+----------+------------+
| Tia       | Carrera  | 1975-09-18 |
| Nikki     | Taylor   | 1972-03-04 |
+-----------+----------+------------+

Example output for rows in Table1 that are not in Table2:

+-----------+----------+------------+
| FirstName | LastName | BirthDate  |
+-----------+----------+------------+
| Yamila    | Diaz     | 1972-03-04 |
+-----------+----------+------------+

Maybe something like this should work:

SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE * NOT IN (SELECT * FROM Table2)
86

If you have 300 columns as you mentioned in another comment, and you want to compare on all columns (assuming the columns are all the same name), you can use a NATURAL LEFT JOIN to implicitly join on all matching column names between the two tables so that you don't have to tediously type out all join conditions manually:

SELECT            a.*
FROM              tbl_1 a
NATURAL LEFT JOIN tbl_2 b
WHERE             b.FirstName IS NULL
  • Note that this only works as expected when none of the columns have NULL values. In MySQL NULL != NULL so every row that has a NULL value will be returned even if there is a duplicate row in the second table. – Kyle Kochis Apr 7 '15 at 2:49
  • 68
    If you have 300 columns, you should redesign your database. – Iharob Al Asimi Jun 1 '16 at 13:50
  • hey this works for me too, thanks! but would that be a problem if the rows is > 300 like you mentioned above? – thekucays Jul 21 '16 at 4:21
  • i'm still confused about the query btw..what if i change "where b.FirstName is null" to "where b.LastName is null" for example? what's the difference? i'm sorry for asking this, i'm still new to sql :D – thekucays Jul 21 '16 at 4:29
164

You need to do the subselect based on a column name, not *.

For example, if you had an id field common to both tables, you could do:

SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT id FROM Table2)

Refer to the MySQL subquery syntax for more examples.

  • 1
    thanks for the clarification! but i really don't need to base the selection of rows on any field, because i'm interested in any variation of any field in the row... – user1006989 Aug 1 '12 at 21:17
  • If there are only a few columns to compare you can do a join as per @Steve's example. If you are actually asking for a general comparison of data in two tables with many columns, you probably want to look for a MySQL diff tool. – Stennie Aug 1 '12 at 21:25
  • 2
    Note that this will always return an empty set if the column you're looking at in Table2 contains nulls. Not an issue if you're doing it based upon the primary key, but relevant to folks trying to use this query in other contexts. – Mark Amery Nov 17 '14 at 18:11
  • you, sir, are a hero! thanks a billion – zeeks Dec 25 '14 at 21:46
  • 2
    But what if we're talking about big data? And Table2 contain 100M rows, for example? – frops May 18 '16 at 7:31
34
SELECT *
FROM Table1 AS a
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
  SELECT *
  FROM Table2 AS b 
  WHERE a.FirstName=b.FirstName AND a.LastName=b.Last_Name
)

EXISTS will help you...

  • Good answer, economical for large data sets, thanks. – ekerner Sep 8 '14 at 15:27
  • Strong. Best answer for large datasets – Ian Chadwick Feb 9 '16 at 19:54
31

A standard LEFT JOIN could resolve the problem and, if the fields on join are indexed,
should also be faster

SELECT *
FROM Table1 as t1 LEFT JOIN Table2 as t2 
ON t1.FirstName = t2.FirstName AND t1.LastName=t2.LastName
WHERE t2.BirthDate Is Null
  • 2
    thanks, but what if the tables have 300 columns? – user1006989 Aug 1 '12 at 21:28
  • Well, I think that this will be an enourmous join and practically impossible for every known database. (Of course this is not the work that a join should do). Perhaps with a stored procedure that loops on the rows, but as pointed by Stennie, a diff tool is better suited for this task. – Steve Aug 1 '12 at 21:34
  • alright, i guess that must be it, btw why the WHERE t2.Birthdate Is Null instead of AND t1.Birthdate = t2.Birthdate? – user1006989 Aug 1 '12 at 21:44
  • Because if you add that, then every row will be returned, you say that in the output should appear only rows not in the second table – Steve Aug 1 '12 at 22:12
  • 1
    This is a terrific answer, as it does not require returning all rows of Table2! – dotancohen Dec 8 '13 at 18:47
6

Try:

SELECT * FROM table1
    LEFT OUTER JOIN table2
    ON table1.FirstName = table2.FirstName and table1.LastName=table2.LastName
    WHERE table2.BirthDate IS NULL
2

Try this simple query. It works perfectly.

select * from Table1 where (FirstName,LastName,BirthDate) not in (select * from Table2);
0

This worked for me in Oracle:

SELECT a.* 
    FROM tbl1 a 
MINUS 
SELECT b.* 
    FROM tbl2 b;
-4
SELECT a.* FROM 
FROM tbl_1 a
MINUS
SELECT b.* FROM 
FROM tbl_2 b

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