1

Assuming this is my schema:

class modelA(models.Model):
  b = models.ManyToManyField(through='linkModel')

class modelB(models.Model):
  name = models.CharField()

class linkModel(models.Models):
  a = models.ForeignKey(modelA)
  b = models.ForeignKey(modelB)
  (other link-relevant stuff)

At what point can I expect to run into query performance issues while looking up instances of B that link to A, and vice versa. 100,000s rows? millions?

Would using a single ForeignKey relation instead of ManyToMany (it might be possible to rearrange the schema in some cases) give better performance?

2 Answers 2

4

Depending on the behaviour of your framework, with which I am not familiar, the join may be passed through to the backing database server for execution. IF that is the case, then you will find that indexing efficiency is O(log n) and the chokepoint is not the join but the size of the result set.

Assuming competent schema design and indexing, bulk data manipulation performance is always gated by the size of the working set.

To get definitive answers applying to your particular combination of database server, framework and application logic, you will have to perform testing, as shockingly out of step with modern practice as that may be.

You don't necessarily need to test with a large complex application in the way. You can excerpt the interesting application code into a test app. You will need bulk data though.

If you are hoping that someone has already tested your particular scenario then you will need to describe in detail your configuration. You have already furnished sample application logic which is a good start.

A surprising number of things can interfere. For example, turning on the Auto-shrink option on a Microsoft SQL Server 2008 database places a colossal overhead and reduces TPM figures by a factor of about 3. You will have to find and document these things.

2

In addition to what Peter Wone said, here is the "ideal" junction table structure that should exist in the database for both "directions" of JOIN to execute optimally:

  • Has a composite PK that is a combination of 2 FKs.
  • Has an alternate index that is the exact "reverse" of the PK.
  • Both indexes (primary and alternate) are compressed, to minimize the overhead of repeated leading edge field.
  • Doesn't have a surrogate key (so we don't need a third index).
  • Is clustered. Since alternate index already contains all the PK fields (just in opposite order), there is no overhead normally associated with alternate indexes in clustered tables. And since it covers the JOIN, there is no double-lookup.

Oracle syntax for that would look like this:

CREATE TABLE LINK_MODEL (
    MODEL_A_ID INT,
    MODEL_B_ID INT,
    PRIMARY KEY (MODEL_A_ID, MODEL_B_ID),
    FOREIGN KEY (MODEL_A_ID) REFERENCES MODEL_A (MODEL_A_ID),
    FOREIGN KEY (MODEL_B_ID) REFERENCES MODEL_B (MODEL_B_ID)
) ORGANIZATION INDEX COMPRESS;

CREATE INDEX LINK_MODEL_IE1 ON LINK_MODEL (MODEL_B_ID, MODEL_A_ID) COMPRESS;

With that, querying for Bs of a given A would require just a simple range scan on index that is LINK_MODEL, without any table heap access (there is no table heap at all). Querying for As of a given B would require a simple range scan on LINK_MODEL_IE1, also without any table heap access.

Unfortunately, not all databases support clustering and index compression, but you should implement as much of this as your DBMS and your ORM allow you to.

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