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I have gone through number of post regarding tx with spring and AspectJ. Below is the summary, Say, I have a service class and its interface

interface TestService {
 void methodA();
 void methodB();
}

class TestServiceImpl implements TesService {

   @Transactional
   void methodA() {
      methodB();
   }

   @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.NEVER)
   void methodB(){}
}

And my configuration

<tx:annotation-driven transaction-manager="jpaTxManager"/>

<bean id="jpaTxManager" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.JpaTransactionManager">
<property name="entityManagerFactory"><ref bean="entityManagerFactory"/></property>
<property name="dataSource"><ref bean="dataSource"/></property>
</bean>

<bean id="testService" class="com.motherframework.plugin.test.service.TestServiceImpl">
     <property name="testDAO" ref="testDAO"/>
</bean>

I am calling testService.methodA() from some client class. As per spring's JDK dynamic proxy usage, it will only care about @Transactional on methodA(), but not @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.NEVER) on methodB(). So the code executes with proper transaction and commits. If we use AspectJ mode then it will also check for @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.NEVER) on methodB() and will throw an exception.

Now my question is, why this limitation is imposed by Spring? Now there are two possibilities for Spring design,

  1. It is a technical limitaion with spring that they can not check annotation in methodB(), though it is public? But if AspectJ can check it, then why not Spring?

  2. Intentionally they have limited this AOP checking for internal method calls. Is this kind of method call (where target method is annotated with different transactionPropagation) is against proper design methodology?

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3

Yes, it's a technical limitation. When you don't use AspectJ, the transactional aspect is implemented by returning a proxy around the actual bean class instance and returning/injecting this proxy into other beans. So, when you call testService.methodA(), the following (basically) happens:

caller ---> transactionalProxy.methodA() ---> testServiceImpl.methodA()

The proxy applies the transactional aspect around the call to testServiceImpl.methodA(): it starts the transaction before, and commits/rollbacks it after.

If you call this.methodB() from methodA(), the following happens:

caller ---> transactionalProxy.methodA() ---> testServiceImpl.methodA() ---> testServiceImpl.methodB()

And since you bypass the proxy, no transactional aspect can be applied.

AspectJ is different because it transforms the byte-code of TestServiceImpl in order to apply aspects around various method invocations.

I wouldn't say that applying aspects around internal method calls is not proper design. You just need to be aware that it works only with byte-code instrumentation.

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  • This answer is the correct one. BTW, Spring AOP does not limit anything intentionally as Abhishek might assume, but the limitation is the dynamic proxy approach as such. It only works if a proxy is used, which just is not true for internal method calls. This is why I call Spring AOP "AOP lite" and only use full AspectJ for my projects. ;-) – kriegaex Aug 14 '14 at 8:48
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It is a technical limitation (as others have answered). If you want Spring to check this, you could modify your service like this:

class TestServiceImpl implements TesService {

   TesService thiz; // setter left outside, assumed to be injected by Spring

   @Transactional
   void methodA() {
      thiz.methodB();
   }

   @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.NEVER)
      void methodB(){}

}
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The idea here is that the outermost method knows what is best for the whole transaction. But, as you noticed, there are corner cases.

Workaround: Move the implementations of the methods to a second bean and inject that bean into your TestServiceImpl. Since you'll get a proxy injected, all method calls will heed the annotations.

You will need to split some methods. If you have this situation:

methodX() {
     ...code before...
     methodB();
     ...code after...
}

you can use a callback:

methodX() {
     Callable<Void> callback = new Callable<Void>() {
         Void call() {
              realImpl.methodB();
         }
     }
     realImpl.methodX(callback);
}

and in your inner bean:

void methodX(Callable<Void> callback) {
     ...code before...
     callback();
     ...code after...
}
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  • Thanks for your reply...but i want to know if it is wrong (by design principle) to have different tx on different method...is that the reason why spring has put this limitation? – Abhishek Chatterjee Aug 3 '12 at 9:53

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