382

What is the difference between PDOStatement::bindParam() and PDOStatement::bindValue()?

195

The answer is in the documentation for bindParam:

Unlike PDOStatement::bindValue(), the variable is bound as a reference and will only be evaluated at the time that PDOStatement::execute() is called.

And execute

call PDOStatement::bindParam() to bind PHP variables to the parameter markers: bound variables pass their value as input and receive the output value, if any, of their associated parameter markers

Example:

$value = 'foo';
$s = $dbh->prepare('SELECT name FROM bar WHERE baz = :baz');
$s->bindParam(':baz', $value); // use bindParam to bind the variable
$value = 'foobarbaz';
$s->execute(); // executed with WHERE baz = 'foobarbaz'

or

$value = 'foo';
$s = $dbh->prepare('SELECT name FROM bar WHERE baz = :baz');
$s->bindValue(':baz', $value); // use bindValue to bind the variable's value
$value = 'foobarbaz';
$s->execute(); // executed with WHERE baz = 'foo'
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668

From the manual entry for PDOStatement::bindParam:

[With bindParam] Unlike PDOStatement::bindValue(), the variable is bound as a reference and will only be evaluated at the time that PDOStatement::execute() is called.

So, for example:

$sex = 'male';
$s = $dbh->prepare('SELECT name FROM students WHERE sex = :sex');
$s->bindParam(':sex', $sex); // use bindParam to bind the variable
$sex = 'female';
$s->execute(); // executed with WHERE sex = 'female'

or

$sex = 'male';
$s = $dbh->prepare('SELECT name FROM students WHERE sex = :sex');
$s->bindValue(':sex', $sex); // use bindValue to bind the variable's value
$sex = 'female';
$s->execute(); // executed with WHERE sex = 'male'
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  • 10
    Brilliant, thanks! Question -- why might you want to use one over the other? Like when would it be useful or necessary to have the bind parameter evaluated only at execute() time? – Coldblackice Jul 17 '13 at 19:18
  • 32
    @Coldblackice If you were executing the query multiple times with different data. With bindValue you'd need to re-bind the data each time. With bindParam you'd just need to update the variable. The main reason for using bindValue would be static data, e.g. literal strings or numbers. – lonesomeday Jul 17 '13 at 20:53
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    For example, you want to use bindValue with function return values: $stmt->bindValue(':status', strtolower($status), PDO::PARAM_STR); – paidforbychrist Dec 20 '18 at 0:10
  • 1
    wanted to upvote, but because it is 666, I will leave it – eddy147 Mar 31 at 13:35
219

Here are some I can think about :

  • With bindParam, you can only pass variables ; not values
  • with bindValue, you can pass both (values, obviously, and variables)
  • bindParam works only with variables because it allows parameters to be given as input/output, by "reference" (and a value is not a valid "reference" in PHP) : it is useful with drivers that (quoting the manual) :

support the invocation of stored procedures that return data as output parameters, and some also as input/output parameters that both send in data and are updated to receive it.

With some DB engines, stored procedures can have parameters that can be used for both input (giving a value from PHP to the procedure) and ouput (returning a value from the stored proc to PHP) ; to bind those parameters, you've got to use bindParam, and not bindValue.

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  • @PascalMartin Just what I wanted to know, can you bind values with bindParam. Cheers. – yehuda Mar 28 '12 at 20:25
  • 1
    I still have no clue what that exactly means, what exactly are the variables and what are the values. I use bindParam to bind a value to a placeholder and with bindValue I can do the same! - in my example at least... – Richard Aug 23 '12 at 6:28
29

From Prepared statements and stored procedures

Use bindParam to insert multiple rows with one time binding:

<?php

$stmt = $dbh->prepare("INSERT INTO REGISTRY (name, value) VALUES (?, ?)");
$stmt->bindParam(1, $name);
$stmt->bindParam(2, $value);

// insert one row
$name = 'one';
$value = 1;
$stmt->execute();

// insert another row with different values
$name = 'two';
$value = 2;
$stmt->execute();
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27

For the most common purpose, you should use bindValue.

bindParam has two tricky or unexpected behaviors:

  • bindParam(':foo', 4, PDO::PARAM_INT) does not work, as it requires passing a variable (as reference).
  • bindParam(':foo', $value, PDO::PARAM_INT) will change $value to string after running execute(). This, of course, can lead to subtle bugs that might be difficult to catch.

Source: http://php.net/manual/en/pdostatement.bindparam.php#94711

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4

You don't have to struggle any longer, when there exists a way lilke this:

$stmt = $pdo->prepare("SELECT * FROM someTable WHERE col = :val");
$stmt->execute([":val" => $bind]); 
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3

The simplest way to put this into perspective for memorization by behavior (in terms of PHP):

  • bindParam: reference
  • bindValue: variable
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  • bindValue takes a value. – user2864740 Aug 2 at 19:33

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