25

I am trying to use the logging service in another service in order to trouble shoot that service.

My config.yml looks like this:

services:
    userbundle_service:
        class:        Main\UserBundle\Controller\UserBundleService
        arguments: [@security.context]

    log_handler:
        class: %monolog.handler.stream.class%
        arguments: [ %kernel.logs_dir%/%kernel.environment%.jini.log ]


    logger:
        class: %monolog.logger.class%
        arguments: [ jini ]
        calls: [ [pushHandler, [@log_handler]] ]

This works fine in controllers etc. however I get no out put when I use it in other services.

Any tips?

35

You pass service id as argument to constructor or setter of a service.

Assuming your other service is the userbundle_service:

userbundle_service:
    class:        Main\UserBundle\Controller\UserBundleService
    arguments: [@security.context, @logger]

Now Logger is passed to UserBundleService constructor provided you properly update it, e.G.

protected $securityContext;
protected $logger;

public function __construct(SecurityContextInterface $securityContext, Logger $logger)
{
    $this->securityContext = $securityContext;
    $this->logger = $logger;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • public function __construct(SecurityContextInterface $securityContext) { $this->securityContext = $securityContext; $this->logger = $logger; } – jini Aug 3 '12 at 18:55
  • 1
    You don't have $logger argument in constructor. – Inoryy Aug 3 '12 at 18:57
  • 2
    so for every injectable service, it has to be included this way? Seems an awful lot of work to just get log messages. – jini Aug 3 '12 at 19:00
  • 3
    protected $securityContext; protected $logger; public function __construct(SecurityContextInterface $securityContext, Logger $logger ) { $this->securityContext = $securityContext; $this->logger = $logger; } – jini Aug 3 '12 at 19:03
  • 2
    In the latest version of Symfony, there has to be quotes around the service name, as in: arguments: ['@security.context', '@logger'] – laurent Sep 29 '16 at 16:16
8

For Symfony 3.3, 4.x and above, the easiest solution is to use Dependency Injection

You can directly inject the service into another service, (say MainService)

// AppBundle/Services/MainService.php
// 'serviceName' is the service we want to inject
public function __construct(\AppBundle\Services\serviceName $injectedService)  {
    $this->injectedService = $injectedService;
}

Then simply, use the injected service in any method of the MainService as

// AppBundle/Services/MainService.php
public function mainServiceMethod() {
    $this->injectedService->doSomething();
}

And viola! You can access any function of the Injected Service!

For older versions of Symfony where autowiring does not exist -

// services.yml
services:
    \AppBundle\Services\MainService:
        arguments: ['@injectedService']
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Worked great for me. – William Hammock Sep 13 '17 at 21:30
  • 1
    I've tried this so that 2 services can reference each other but you end up with a circular reference issue. – Adambean Aug 1 '19 at 19:50
-4

You can use the container in your service :

userbundle_service:
    class:        Main\UserBundle\Controller\UserBundleService
    arguments: [@security.context]

In your service :

use Symfony\Component\DependencyInjection\ContainerInterface;
class UserBundleService {
    /**
     * @var ContainerInterface
     */
    private $_container;
    public function __construct(ContainerInterface $_container) {
        $this->_container = $_container;
    }
    $var = $this->_container->get('logger');
    $var->functionLoggerService();

}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    No, passing the container in the constructor of a service is a bad practice and should be avoided ! – Arne May 3 '17 at 12:27

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