21

I have three types of strings that I'd like to capitalize in a bash script. I figured sed/awk would be my best bet, but I'm not sure. What's the best way given the following requirements?

  1. single word
    e.g. taco -> Taco

  2. multiple words separated by hyphens
    e.g. my-fish-tacos -> My-Fish-Tacos

  3. multiple words separated by underscores
    e.g. my_fish_tacos -> My_Fish_Tacos

6 Answers 6

33

There's no need to use capture groups (although & is a one in a way):

echo "taco my-fish-tacos my_fish_tacos" | sed 's/[^ _-]*/\u&/g'

The output:

Taco My-Fish-Tacos My_Fish_Tacos

The escaped lower case "u" capitalizes the next character in the matched sub-string.

4
  • How would I modify this to handle words that are all-caps? For example my-FISH-TACOS should ouput My-Fish-Tacos.
    – GregB
    Aug 6, 2012 at 6:09
  • 5
    @GregB: Tell it to lowercase all the characters then uppercase the next one: sed 's/[^ _-]*/\L\u&/g' Aug 6, 2012 at 10:32
  • 4
    Note: this is a GNU sed extension. BSD sed users (including OS X) can't do this. Mar 3, 2014 at 3:56
  • @DennisWilliamson invite you in unix.stackexchange.com/questions/413562/…
    – alhelal
    Dec 29, 2017 at 14:16
8

Using awk:

echo 'test' | awk '{
     for ( i=1; i <= NF; i++) {
         sub(".", substr(toupper($i), 1,1) , $i);
         print $i;
         # or
         # print substr(toupper($i), 1,1) substr($i, 2);
     }
}'
2
  • A bit of explanation about the example above: NF - Built-in awk variable comes from Number of fields (generally shows how many whitespace separated strings you have on a row) - in this example it will return 1 substr - returns substring, the declaration looks like this substr(string, start, length). sub - substitute function - sub(regex, replacement, target) Jan 12, 2016 at 0:47
  • 2
    Note: it’s probably slightly more efficient to use toupper(substr(... instead of substr(toupper(.... Apr 14, 2016 at 17:15
6

Try the following:

sed 's/\([a-z]\)\([a-z]*\)/\U\1\L\2/g'

It works for me using GNU sed, but I don't think BSD sed supports \U and \L.

3

Here is a solution that does not use the \u, that is not common to all seds.

Save this file into capitalize.sed, then run sed -i -f capitalize.sed FILE

s:^:.:
h
y/qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnm/QWERTYUIOPASDFGHJKLZXCVBNM/ 
G 
s:$:\n:
:r
/^.\n.\n/{s:::;p;d}
/^[^[:alpha:]][[:alpha:]]/ {
    s:.\(.\)\(.*\):x\2\1: 
    s:\n\(..\):\nx: 
    tr
}

/^[[:alpha:]][[:alpha:]]/ {
    s:\n.\(.\)\(.*\)$:\nx\2\1:
    s:..:x:
    tr
}
/^[^\n]/ {
    s:^.\(.\)\(.*\)$:.\2\1:
    s:\n..:\n.:
    tr
}
1

alinsoar's mind-blowing solution doesn't work at all in Plan9 sed, or correctly in busybox sed. But you should still try to figure out how it's supposed to do its thing: you will learn a lot about sed.

Here's a not-as-clever but easier to understand version which works in at least Plan9, busybox, and GNU sed (and probably BSD and MacOS). Plan9 sed needs backslashes removed in the match part of the s command.

#! /bin/sed -f

y/PYFGCRLAOEUIDHTNSQJKXBMWVZ/pyfgcrlaoeuidhtnsqjkxbmwvz/

s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)a/\1A/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)b/\1B/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)c/\1C/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)d/\1D/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)e/\1E/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)f/\1F/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)g/\1G/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)h/\1H/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)i/\1I/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)j/\1J/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)k/\1K/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)l/\1L/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)m/\1M/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)n/\1N/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)o/\1O/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)p/\1P/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)q/\1Q/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)r/\1R/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)s/\1S/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)t/\1T/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)u/\1U/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)v/\1V/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)w/\1W/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)x/\1X/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)y/\1Y/g
s/\(^\|[^A-Za-z]\)z/\1Z/g
0

This might work for you (GNU sed):

echo "aaa bbb ccc aaa-bbb-ccc aaa_bbb_ccc aaa-bbb_ccc"  | sed 's/\<.\|_./\U&/g'
Aaa Bbb Ccc Aaa-Bbb-Ccc Aaa_Bbb_Ccc Aaa-Bbb_Ccc

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