44

I would like to sort and binary search a static array of strings via the String.CompareTo comparator.

The problem is that both sorting, and binary searching requires that a Comparator object be passed in -- So how do I pass in the built in string comparator?

0

12 Answers 12

22

The Arrays class has versions of sort() and binarySearch() which don't require a Comparator. For example, you can use the version of Arrays.sort() which just takes an array of objects. These methods call the compareTo() method of the objects in the array.

0
43

You may write your own comparator

public class ExampleComparator  implements Comparator<String> {
  public int compare(String obj1, String obj2) {
    if (obj1 == obj2) {
        return 0;
    }
    if (obj1 == null) {
        return -1;
    }
    if (obj2 == null) {
        return 1;
    }
    return obj1.compareTo(obj2);
  }
}
4
  • 9
    Comparator is a generic type, so ExampleComparator should probably implement Comparator<String> to avoid warnings. – theisenp May 14 '13 at 20:41
  • For string comparator, keep in mind to lowercase (or uppercase) string before compare them otherwise you should get this order A-Za-z – Andrea Girardi Feb 19 '14 at 12:00
  • 2
    Need to implement equals() too. – wcochran Oct 3 '14 at 23:57
  • 3
    Are you sure that you are supposed to return -1 in case that obj1==null && obj2==null, though? – towi Nov 24 '17 at 8:16
37

Solution for Java 8 based on java.util.Comparator.comparing(...):

Comparator<String> c = Comparator.comparing(String::toString);

or

Comparator<String> c = Comparator.comparing((String x) -> x);
1
  • 9
    Or Comparator.comparing(Function.identity()) – ailveen Dec 15 '17 at 13:24
14

If you do find yourslef needing a Comparator, and you already use Guava, you can use Ordering.natural().

11

This is a generic Comparator for any kind of Comparable object, not just String:

package util;

import java.util.Comparator;

/**
 * The Default Comparator for classes implementing Comparable.
 *
 * @param <E> the type of the comparable objects.
 *
 * @author Michael Belivanakis (michael.gr)
 */
public final class DefaultComparator<E extends Comparable<E>> implements Comparator<E>
{
    @SuppressWarnings( "rawtypes" )
    private static final DefaultComparator<?> INSTANCE = new DefaultComparator();

    /**
     * Get an instance of DefaultComparator for any type of Comparable.
     *
     * @param <T> the type of Comparable of interest.
     *
     * @return an instance of DefaultComparator for comparing instances of the requested type.
     */
    public static <T extends Comparable<T>> Comparator<T> getInstance()
    {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        Comparator<T> result = (Comparator<T>)INSTANCE;
        return result;
    }

    private DefaultComparator()
    {
    }

    @Override
    public int compare( E o1, E o2 )
    {
        if( o1 == o2 )
            return 0;
        if( o1 == null )
            return 1;
        if( o2 == null )
            return -1;
        return o1.compareTo( o2 );
    }
}

How to use with String:

Comparator<String> stringComparator = DefaultComparator.getInstance();
2
  • @Sharcoux I see! C-:= – Mike Nakis Jul 12 '16 at 16:27
  • Could be nice to add the following code to that class: public static <T extends Comparable<T>> Comparator<T> getReversedInstance() { return Collections.reverseOrder((Comparator<T>) getInstance()); } – Martin Vatshelle Jul 12 '17 at 14:57
10

Again, don't need the comparator for Arrays.binarySearch(Object[] a, Object key) so long as the types of objects are comparable, but with lambda expressions this is now way easier.

Simply replace the comparator with the method reference: String::compareTo

E.g.:

Arrays.binarySearch(someStringArray, "The String to find.", String::compareTo);

You could also use

Arrays.binarySearch(someStringArray, "The String to find.", (a,b) -> a.compareTo(b));

but even before lambdas, there were always anonymous classes:

Arrays.binarySearch(
                someStringArray,
                "The String to find.",
                new Comparator<String>() {
                    @Override
                    public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
                        return o1.compareTo(o2);
                    }
                });
10

Ok this is a few years later but with java 8 you can use Comparator.naturalOrder():

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/Comparator.html#naturalOrder--

From javadoc:

static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> Comparator<T> naturalOrder()

Returns a comparator that compares Comparable objects in natural order. The returned comparator is serializable and throws NullPointerException when comparing null.

1
  • Links to potential answers are always welcome, but please add most important parts here in case link gets removed. – Nikolay Mihaylov Aug 13 '16 at 19:11
6

Also, if you want case-insensitive comparison, in recent versions of Java the String class contains a public static final field called CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER which is of type Comparator<String>, as I just recently found out. So, you can get your job done using String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER.

1
  • 1
    @tallseth this is the right answer only if you are interested in case-insensitive search, and you are using a recent version of java. If what you need is case-sensitive search, or if you are stuck with some old version of java, then this is not the right answer for you. – Mike Nakis Jul 15 '15 at 11:45
3

We can use the String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER comparator to compare the strings in case insensitive order.

Arrays.binarySearch(someStringArray, "The String to find.",String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER);
1

To generalize the good answer of Mike Nakis with String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER, you can also use :

Collator.getInstance();

See Collator

-1

Regarding Nambari's answer there was a mistake. If you compare values using double equal sign == program will never reach compare method, unless someone will use new keyword to create String object which is not the best practice. This might be a bit better solution:

public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
        if (o1 == null && o2 == null){return 0;}
        if (o1 == null) { return -1;}
        if (o2 == null) { return 1;}
        return o1.compareTo(o2);
    }

P.S. Thanks for comments ;)

2
  • 1
    Although this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how it answers the question would significantly improve its long-term value. Please edit your answer to add some explanation. – Toby Speight Jun 14 '16 at 15:13
  • 1
    How is this effectively any different from Nambari's answer? – All Workers Are Essential Jun 14 '16 at 18:55
-1

You can use the StringUtils.compare("a", "b")

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