1

I'm trying to count the number of characters that occur in a java string.

For example:

given the poker hand 6s/3d/2H/13c/Ad

how many times does the / character occur? = 4

The user can enter a different hand with a changing number of card variables so hardcoding a method to check for occurrences isn't going to work.

A separator may be any one of: - / space (with only one separator type allowed to be used in one hand). So I need to be able to check if either of the separators occurs 4 times otherwise the incorrect format has been given.

Here's a some java code to give a better idea of what I'm trying to do:

    String hand = "6s/1c/2H/13c/Ad";
    System.out.println("Original hand: " + hand);

    // split the hand string into individual cards
    String[] cards = hand.split(hand);

    // Checking for separators
    // Need to check for the correct number of separators
    if(hand.contains("/")){
        cards = hand.split("/");
    } else if (hand.contains("-")){
        cards = hand.split("-");
    } else if (hand.contains(" ")){
        cards = hand.split(" ");
    } else {
        System.out.println("Incorrect format!");

    }

Any help would be great!

Also this is a school project/homework.

Edit 1--------------------------------------------------------

OK so here's my code after your suggestions

    String hand = "6s 1c/2H-13c Ad";
    System.out.println("Original hand: " + hand);

    // split the hand string into individual cards
    String[] cards = hand.split("[(//\\-\\s)]");

    if (cards.length != 5) {
        System.out.println("Incorrect format!");    
    } else {

        for (String card : cards) {
            System.out.println(card);
        }
    }

The given hand above is not in the correct format because the user can only use ONE type of separator for a given hand. For example:

  • 6s/1c/2H/13c/Ad - correct
  • 6s-1c-2H-13c-Ad - correct
  • 6s 1c 2H 13c Ad - correct

How do I ensure that the user only uses ONE type of separator??

Cheers for the answers so far!

Edit 2 ------------------------------------------

So playing around with nested if statements my code now looks like this:

    String hand = "6s/1c/2H/13c/Ad";
    System.out.println("Original hand: " + hand);

    // split the hand string into individual cards

    if(hand.contains("/")){
        String[] cards = hand.split("/");
        if(cards.length != 5){
            System.out.println("Incorrect format! 1");
        } else {
            for (String card : cards) {
                System.out.println(card);
            }
        }

    } else if(hand.contains("-")){
        String[] cards = hand.split("-");
        if(cards.length != 5){
            System.out.println("Incorrect format! 2");
        } else {
            for (String card : cards) {
                System.out.println(card);
            }
        }

    } else if(hand.contains(" ")){
        String[] cards = hand.split(" ");
        if(cards.length != 5){
            System.out.println("Incorrect format! 3");
        } else {
            for (String card : cards) {
                System.out.println(card);
            }
        }
    } else {
        System.out.println("Incorrect format! 4");
    }

This way works as intended but is ugly!

Any suggestions would be great cheers.

closed as too localized by Robert Harvey Sep 26 '12 at 18:24

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  • 1
    As this is homework, just a hint. The split method allows for a regular expression, this might solve your problem. Please see docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/regex/… – home Aug 4 '12 at 6:17
  • Thanks. I've been trying to use regular expressions but it doesn't seem to work if the given hand is changed. For example the user may input AS/13D/JS/13S/AD this changes where the separators occur. But in saying this it could be the way i'm doing my regex. Cheers. – FreshWaterJellyFish Aug 4 '12 at 6:22
  • @user1575658 What regex have you tried? – assylias Aug 4 '12 at 6:26
  • Post your regex and then let SO assist you. – SiB Aug 4 '12 at 6:27
  • This is my regex [(//\\-\\s)] – FreshWaterJellyFish Aug 4 '12 at 7:10
0

I wrote this before the first question edit, so I am responding to the original question and not its addendum question.

In the documentation on String.split, it is unclear whether empty strings count as substrings. Notice that "--".split("-").length == 0. The question may implicitly guarantee that two or more characters separate delimiters, but that is a risky assumption and where Java's String.split becomes problematic.

This is a partial simpler implementation:

    char[] delims = {'/', ' ', '-'};
    int result = 0;
    for (char delim : delims) {
        for (int i = 0; i < hand.length(); i++) {
            if (hand.charAt(i) == delim) {
                ++result;
            }
        }
    }

Full code follows, with editorial comments intended for homework.

interface Counter {
    int count(String hand);
}
class FirstCounter implements Counter {
    public int count(String hand) {
        String[] cards = hand.split(hand);
        if(hand.contains("/")){
            cards = hand.split("/");
        } else if (hand.contains("-")){
            cards = hand.split("-");
        } else if (hand.contains(" ")){
            cards = hand.split(" ");
        } else {
            // Prefer to fail fast unless your requirement
            // really is to only print "incorrect format"
            //System.out.println("Incorrect format!");
            throw new RuntimeException("Incorrect format!");
        }
        if (hand.endsWith("-") || hand.endsWith("/") || hand.endsWith(" ")) {
            return cards.length;
        }
        return cards.length - 1;
    }    
}
class SecondCounter implements Counter {
    public int count(String hand) {
        char[] delims = {'/', ' ', '-'};
        int result = 0;
        for (char delim : delims) {
            for (int i = 0; i < hand.length(); i++) {
                if (hand.charAt(i) == delim) {
                    ++result;
                }
            }
        }
        if (result == 0) {
            // This is a hack or inconsistent with requirements,
            // but necessary to match original posted code behavior
            throw new RuntimeException("Incorrect format!");
        }
        return result;
    }
}
class Main {
    private static int testCount = 0;

    static void realAssert(boolean condition) {
        if (!condition) {
            throw new AssertionError("Java has no real assert");
        }
    }

    static void test(Counter counter) {
        ++testCount;
        try {
            realAssert(counter.count("6s/3d/2H/13c/Ad") == 4);
            realAssert(counter.count("6s-3d-2H-13c-Ad") == 4);
            realAssert(counter.count("6s 3d 2H 13c Ad") == 4);
            // Don't forget boundary conditions
            realAssert(counter.count("6s-3d-2H-13c-") == 4);
            realAssert(counter.count("6s/3d/2H/13c/") == 4);
            realAssert(counter.count("6s 3d 2H 13c ") == 4);
            realAssert(counter.count("-6s-3d-2H-13c-") == 5);
            realAssert(counter.count("/6s/3d/2H/13c/") == 5);
            realAssert(counter.count(" 6s 3d 2H 13c ") == 5);
            realAssert(counter.count("--") == 2);
            // Remember to test error conditions
            try {
                counter.count("foobar");
                realAssert(false);
            } catch (RuntimeException e) {
                // Catching RuntimeException is normally bad
                // done only as example.
                // Also normally bad, this is an empty catch
                // block. These are sometimes useful, but always
                // at least add a comment that explains that this
                // catch block really should be empty, in this case
                // because the test was meant to throw an Error.
            }
            try {
                counter.count("foo/bar-baz");
                // Left as exercise for reader, based on question
                // it is possible this should be disallowed.
                //realAssert(false);
            } catch (RuntimeException e) {
                // Ditto above, intentionally empty catch
            }
            System.out.println("Test " + testCount + " succeeded");
        }
        catch (Error e) {
            // XXX: Don't catch Error in non-example code
            System.out.println("Test " + testCount + " failed");
            /* Normally don't use printStackTrace either */
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        test(new FirstCounter());
        test(new SecondCounter());
    }
}

Just for education, the regular expression approach can be good. The entire solution takes one line of Ruby, hand.split(/[\-\/ ]/, -1).length - 1.

1

Without giving away the answer, you want to specify the delimiter to split such that the array of Strings returned looks like:

cards[0] = "6s"
cards[1] = "1c"
cards[2] = "2H"
.
.
.

In your particular hand String, you have a convenient separator for each card that you can use to achieve this...

0

Use regex

Eg:

String reg = new String();
String s = "hjhjhkello/hi"; 
Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("[(/-\\\\s)]");  // Will find for / or - or space
Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(s);

while(matcher.find()){

 reg = matcher.group());

}


String[] arr = hand.split(reg);
  • 2
    I believe we are not supposed to provide the complete answer for homework questions... a hint would suffice. – SiB Aug 4 '12 at 6:25
0

hand.split(hand) won't work. As @home said, you should split the input string on a regular expression. Understand that the regular expression doesn't have to (and shouldn't) match the whole input string -- it should match any individual separator. This is how String.split works when passed a regular expression -- each place where the regular expression matches is taken as a separator, and the parts between matches are returned as an array.

So: Try to write a regular expression which will match any one separator character. Then, check that the returned array has the right number of elements. If the array is called hand, you can use hand.length for that.

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