47

I have this …

$(document).keypress(function(e) {
        if ( e.keyCode === 119 ) // w
            doSomething();
    });

Wo when pressing "w" on my document the doSomething() function fires. How can I prevent it from firing when I'm currently typing (in focus) in an input field or textarea?

85

You'll have to filter out the elements after the event and not in the selector, like this

$(document).on('keypress', function(e) {
    var tag = e.target.tagName.toLowerCase();
    if ( e.which === 119 && tag != 'input' && tag != 'textarea') 
        doSomething();
});

this checks the tagname of the event.target, the element the event originated from, and only fires the function if the event did not originate from an input or textarea.

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  • 2
    You saved me. I used this from down answer: if (jQuery(e.target).is('input, textarea, select')) { return; } – Osify Mar 13 '15 at 7:45
  • Why not use e.key instead of e.which? – ratskin Aug 3 '18 at 17:31
  • @ElliotSchep - Because I wrote this in 2012, when e.key didn't exist, and jQuery normalized e.which – adeneo Aug 4 '18 at 12:45
  • 1
    Hehe, well great job then – ratskin Aug 4 '18 at 12:46
13

If your event handler is bound to document, the event will have already been raised on the input element and bubbled up to the html element, so you will have to handle the exclusion within the code for the handler itself. The alternative is specifically binding a second handler for the input elements which prevents the event from bubbling, but that is probably not the right approach.

Code demo

$(function() {
    $(document).keypress(function(e) {
        if ($(e.target).is('input, textarea')) {
            return;   
        }
        if (e.which === 119) doSomething();
    });
});​

p.s. you can have a look at the jQuery event object documentation to see what properties it exposes.

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6

In jQuery, e.which is the normalized property, not e.keyCode.

To check if you are not in an input you can check the document.activeElement:

$(document).keypress(function(e) {
    if (e.which === 119 && !$(document.activeElement).is(":input,[contenteditable]")) {
        doSomething();
    }
});

Demo. http://jsfiddle.net/pxCS2/1/

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  • Are you sure there is such a thing as an ':input' pseudo-selector? I haven't been able to find a reference for this. – julien_c May 21 '13 at 15:39
  • Warning: <button> is considered an :input. – BrunoLM Apr 11 '17 at 2:16
2

The easiest and perfect solution is:

$(document).keypress(function(e) {
    if (e.which == 119 && !$(':focus').length) {
        doSomething();
    }
});
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    As your code is currently written, it filters too much. Anchors by default can get focus. Also, anything with a tabindex. So, this isn't the best solution for handling keyboard shortcuts on a web page where the keyboard may be used to navigate around the web page. jsfiddle.net/wiredprairie/pp9e9 – WiredPrairie Mar 20 '13 at 22:05

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