27

I'm trying to insert some simple registry keys using Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey in c# but the path automatically changes from:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Test

to

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Test

I tried google but I only get some vague and confusing results. Has anyone dealt with this issue before? Some example code would be much appereciated.

25

You can use RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey to solve this problem:

var baseReg = RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey(RegistryHive.LocalMachine, RegistryView.Registry64);
var reg = baseReg.CreateSubKey("Software\\Test");
  • 5
    only in .NET 4+ – Kevin Mar 4 '15 at 17:36
  • I was searching for an example of how to use RegistryView.Registry64 and by accident found it here. None of the M$ docs have an example, they just say use it. My any CPU app was reading the wow6432uninstall when I told it to read the regular uninstall. This is the solution – sdjuan Oct 13 '16 at 2:46
  • 2
    Don't forget to dispose baseReg! using(var baseReg = ...) { .. } – Vladimir Arustamian Sep 1 '17 at 9:57
8

Under WOW64, certain registry keys are redirected (SOFTWARE). When a 32-bit or 64-bit application makes a registry call for a redirected key, the registry redirector intercepts the call and maps it to the key's corresponding physical registry location. For more information, see Registry Redirector.

You can use the RegistryView Enumeration on RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey Method to open the 32-bit view explicitly and access HKLM\Software\ directly.

8

I don't know how to solve it using a .reg file. But only in a BAT file, as follow:

You must add /reg:64 at the end of the command line. ex:

REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Authentication\LogonUI\Background" /v "OEMBackground" /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001 /f /reg:64

Source: Wow6432Node and how to Deploy Registry settings to 64 bit systems via Sccm

  • Nice! exactly what I was looking for, Thanks. – Ron Apr 13 '15 at 0:36
  • The question was how can this be done in C# (programatically), not a registry file or batch file. – Matty Brown Sep 13 '18 at 19:25
-1

Here is the working code I have developed to both read and write ONLY the 32-bit registry. It works in both 32-bit and 64-bit applications. The 'read' call updates the registry if the value is not set, but it is very obvious how to remove that. It requires .Net 4.0, and uses the OpenBaseKey/OpenSubKey methods.

I currently use it to allow a 64-bit background service and a 32-bit tray application to access the same registry keys seamlessly.

using Microsoft.Win32;

namespace SimpleSettings
{
public class Settings
{
    private static string RegistrySubKey = @"SOFTWARE\BlahCompany\BlahApp";

    public static void write(string setting, string value)
    {
        using (RegistryKey registryView = RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey(RegistryHive.LocalMachine, RegistryView.Registry32))
        using (RegistryKey registryCreate = registryView.CreateSubKey(RegistrySubKey))
        using (RegistryKey registryKey = registryView.OpenSubKey(RegistrySubKey, true))
        {
            registryKey.SetValue(setting, value, RegistryValueKind.String);
        }        
    }
    public static string read(string setting, string def)
    {
        string output = string.Empty;
        using (RegistryKey registryView = RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey(RegistryHive.LocalMachine, RegistryView.Registry32))
        using (RegistryKey registryCreate = registryView.CreateSubKey(RegistrySubKey))
        using (RegistryKey registryKey = registryView.OpenSubKey(RegistrySubKey, false))
        {
            // Read the registry, but if it is blank, update the registry and return the default.
            output = (string)registryKey.GetValue(setting, string.Empty);
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(output))
            {
                output = def;
                write(setting, def);
            }
        }
        return output;
    }
}
}

Usage: Put this in it's own class file (.cs) and call it as such:

using SimpleSettings;
string mysetting = Settings.read("SETTINGNAME","DEFAULTVALUE");
  • This still writes to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node for me :( – Dave Thompson Mar 28 '18 at 7:47
  • So even with your code, some keys will be redirected even if you specify Registry32, such as SOFTWARE Refer to MSDN article on which keys are redirected msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/aa384253%28v=VS.85%29.aspx – Dave Thompson Mar 28 '18 at 8:00
  • Hmm. There might be something setup incorrectly in your project, then. In your app.manifest, what do you have requestedExecutionLevel set to? – Miles Prower May 21 '18 at 19:10
  • <requestedExecutionLevel level="requireAdministrator" uiAccess="false" /> – Dave Thompson May 23 '18 at 6:14

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