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I'm trying to follow Zed Shaw's guide Learning Python the Hard Way. I need to use Python in PowerShell.

I have Python 2.7.3 installed in C:\Python27. Whenever I type python into a PowerShell window, I get an error that says:

the term 'python' is not recognized as the name of a cmdlet, function, script file, or operable program.

I also typed in this: [Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Path", "$env:Path;C:\Python27", "User")

That was a suggested solution provided, but typing python into a PowerShell window still does nothing. I can type in "start python" and it opens up a window with Python, but I need it in PowerShell.

4
  • Works for me and I never set any paths for Python. What version of Powershell are you using? Mine is 1.0 the dark blue screen? Just be sure C:\Python27\ is in the PATH listing. Powershell should be there too. Mine is in system not user. Why do you worry about setting it from the command line? Use you windows Luke. It's the force of the future. :D Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 6:30
  • Just a note to anyone landing here from google, the answers setting path are all correct, but this problem probably stems from not giving the python installer administrative rights it needs to set the path itself. An alternative may be to simply right click the installer and select run as administrator, then repair the installation. If that still doesn't work, choose the [Environment] answer below that corresponds to your python version and installation directory. Commented Nov 18, 2015 at 20:06
  • This approach is no longer good advice for Windows. Instead of adding Python's executable directly to path, it's better to allow the installer (a modern one) to install pylauncher. This adds a py command to PATH, and py can be used to invoke any specific installed minor version of Python without adding its python.exe to PATH.
    – jpmc26
    Commented Sep 25, 2019 at 13:31
  • Developers often use Python virtual environments which does not need the Python executable in the PATH variable. docs.python.org/3/library/venv.html
    – lit
    Commented Aug 7, 2023 at 13:30

13 Answers 13

100

Try setting the path this way:

 $env:path="$env:Path;C:\Python27"
4
  • 3
    Sometimes you install Python on Windows and it doesn't configure the path correctly. Make sure you enter [Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Path", "$env:Path;C:\Python27", "User") in PowerShell to configure it correctly. You also have to either restart PowerShell or your whole computer to get it to really be fixed.
    – user2145645
    Commented May 26, 2016 at 15:06
  • 4
    @LameBrains When you create something like a variable in a terminal it only exists for the current session. If you want to make it "permanent" you need to add it in a file that gets run at startup (profile / rc files). In the case of Powershell type $profile to find yours. Commented Apr 6, 2017 at 1:43
  • 1
    I have Anaconda3 installed. This did the trick $env:path="$env:Path;C:\ProgramData\Anaconda3" and $env:path="$env:Path;C:\ProgramData\Anaconda3\Scripts" (the second command allowed me to access conda and Jupyter notebook
    – blaylockbk
    Commented Jun 20, 2018 at 19:29
  • @blaylockbk where do u set it in visual studio? settings.json?
    – ERJAN
    Commented May 28, 2020 at 12:13
27

For what's worth, this command did it for me (Python 3.3):

[System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("PATH", $Env:Path + ";C:\Python33", "Machine")

I just had to restart the PowerShell window after that.

1
  • 2
    Run it as administrator
    – Faiz
    Commented Aug 24, 2018 at 10:10
20

$env:path="$env:Path;C:\Python27" will only set it for the current session. Next time you open PowerShell, you will have to do the same thing again.

The [Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable() is the right way, and it would have set your PATH environment variable permanently. You just have to start PowerShell again to see the effect in this case.

1
  • 3
    [Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable() Can you please elaborate as to how to get that to work? You are right about the one time usage of Mike's command.
    – Man
    Commented Dec 23, 2013 at 3:47
12

The directory is not set correctly, so please follow these steps.

  1. "MyComputer"Right ClickProperties"System Properties""Advanced" tab

  2. "Environment Variables""Path""Edit"

  3. In the "Variable value" box, make sure you see following:

    ;c:\python27\;c:\python27\scripts
    
  4. Click OK. Test this change by restarting your Windows PowerShell. Type

    python
    
  5. Now Python version 2 runs! Yay!

3
  • C:\Python27\ C:\Python27\Scripts\ did it for me, Thanks!
    – Quang Van
    Commented Mar 7, 2017 at 16:30
  • 2
    This works! Added these to the path: C:\ProgramData\Anaconda3 and C:\ProgramData\Anaconda3\Scripts
    – blaylockbk
    Commented Jun 20, 2018 at 19:48
  • Those using Visual Studio and Anaconda, add the following two paths : C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\Shared\Anaconda3_64 C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\Shared\Anaconda3_64\Scripts Commented Jul 2, 2018 at 17:29
9

For a permanent solution I found the following worked:

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Path", "$env:Path;C:\Python 3.5")
7

This works for me permanently:

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Path", "$env:Path;C:\Python27","User")

6

For versions above Python 3.3, using the python command directly is no longer optimal and may lead to unexpected things like opening of Windows Store.
It's now common to have multiple python versions in different folders which are installed by different programs and users, and they may conflict if there is a default one persistently available from the command line.

The intended way is to use some helper tool to dynamically select one of folders containing python*.exe (these folders can also be referred as environments or versions). For example, Anaconda uses simple bat file for this.
The default tool for Windows is python launcher, which is included in official installation (and which is probably already installed on your system). Try simple py command where previously python was used. More details here.

For example, to check if launcher is presented and which installed python versions it finds: py --list-paths To run script: py -3. main.py or simply py main.py
To use directly in PowerShell as asked in this question: py

Additional confirmation.

5

From the Python Guide, this is what worked for me (Python 2.7.9): [Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Path", "$env:Path;C:\Python27\;C:\Python27\Scripts\", "User")

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  • 2
    Awesome Thanks man i tried this solution after my Vs Code reset the path. It works like magic. but remember to restart after running this line of code in power shell Commented Jun 13, 2020 at 8:06
4

Sometimes you install Python on Windows and it doesn't configure the path correctly.

Make sure you enter [Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Path", "$env:Path;C:\Python27", "User")
in PowerShell to configure it correctly.

You also have to either restart PowerShell or your whole computer to get it to really be fixed.

1
  • 1
    Restarting my Windows 10 computer worked just fine for me. Thanks!! Commented Jan 31, 2018 at 3:42
1

As MaxPRafferty mentioned:

Just a note to anyone landing here from google, the answers setting path are all correct, but this problem probably stems from not giving the python installer administrative rights it needs to set the path itself. An alternative may be to simply right click the installer and select run as administrator, then repair the installation. If that still doesn't work, choose the [Environment] answer below that corresponds to your python version and installation directory. – MaxPRafferty Nov 18 '15 at 20:06

Maybe it is wise to let Python installer to add the path itself. The trap here is that by default Python installer does NOT add path for you. You should look carefully (by scrolling down to see what has been installed) during the installation process instead of directly nexting to the end.

What he missed saying is that you cannot run as administrator once you have installed it. Uninstall and reinstall may do, but the simplest is to right click and Troubleshoot compatibility, being careful this time to check the 'add path' in the "what to install" dialog before hiting next. Then restart powershell. Voilà. It works for me.

1

To be able to use Python immediately without restarting the shell window you need to change the path for the machine, the process and the user.

Function Get-EnvVariableNameList {
    [cmdletbinding()]
    $allEnvVars = Get-ChildItem Env:
    $allEnvNamesArray = $allEnvVars.Name
    $pathEnvNamesList = New-Object System.Collections.ArrayList
    $pathEnvNamesList.AddRange($allEnvNamesArray)
    return ,$pathEnvNamesList
}

Function Add-EnvVarIfNotPresent {
Param (
[string]$variableNameToAdd,
[string]$variableValueToAdd
   ) 
    $nameList = Get-EnvVariableNameList
    $alreadyPresentCount = ($nameList | Where{$_ -like $variableNameToAdd}).Count
    #$message = ''
    if ($alreadyPresentCount -eq 0)
    {
    [System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable($variableNameToAdd, $variableValueToAdd, [System.EnvironmentVariableTarget]::Machine)
    [System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable($variableNameToAdd, $variableValueToAdd, [System.EnvironmentVariableTarget]::Process)
    [System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable($variableNameToAdd, $variableValueToAdd, [System.EnvironmentVariableTarget]::User)
        $message = "Enviromental variable added to machine, process and user to include $variableNameToAdd"
    }
    else
    {
        $message = 'Environmental variable already exists. Consider using a different function to modify it'
    }
    Write-Information $message
}


Function Get-EnvExtensionList {
    $pathExtArray =  ($env:PATHEXT).Split("{;}")
    $pathExtList = New-Object System.Collections.ArrayList
    $pathExtList.AddRange($pathExtArray)
    return ,$pathExtList
}


Function Add-EnvExtension {
Param (
[string]$pathExtToAdd
   ) 
    $pathList = Get-EnvExtensionList
    $alreadyPresentCount = ($pathList | Where{$_ -like $pathToAdd}).Count
    if ($alreadyPresentCount -eq 0)
    {
        $pathList.Add($pathExtToAdd)
        $returnPath = $pathList -join ";"
        [System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable('pathext', $returnPath, [System.EnvironmentVariableTarget]::Machine)
        [System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable('pathext', $returnPath, [System.EnvironmentVariableTarget]::Process)
        [System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable('pathext', $returnPath, [System.EnvironmentVariableTarget]::User)
        $message = "Path extension added to machine, process and user paths to include $pathExtToAdd"
    }
    else
    {
        $message = 'Path extension already exists'
    }
    Write-Information $message
}

Function Get-EnvPathList {
    [cmdletbinding()]
    $pathArray =  ($env:PATH).Split("{;}")
    $pathList = New-Object System.Collections.ArrayList
    $pathList.AddRange($pathArray)
    return ,$pathList
}

Function Add-EnvPath {
Param (
[string]$pathToAdd
   ) 
    $pathList = Get-EnvPathList
    $alreadyPresentCount = ($pathList | Where{$_ -like $pathToAdd}).Count
    if ($alreadyPresentCount -eq 0)
    {
        $pathList.Add($pathToAdd)
        $returnPath = $pathList -join ";"
        [System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable('path', $returnPath, [System.EnvironmentVariableTarget]::Machine)
        [System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable('path', $returnPath, [System.EnvironmentVariableTarget]::Process)
        [System.Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable('path', $returnPath, [System.EnvironmentVariableTarget]::User)
        $message = "Path added to machine, process and user paths to include $pathToAdd"
    }
    else
    {
        $message = 'Path already exists'
    }
    Write-Information $message
}

Add-EnvExtension '.PY'
Add-EnvExtension '.PYW'
Add-EnvPath 'C:\Python27\'
1

Try the command this way:

cd C:\Users\XXX
python.exe

instead of:

cd C:\Users\XXX
python
1
  • Python.exe worked for me. What should I do so that it can work for "python"
    – Sandeep
    Commented Nov 12, 2016 at 16:39
0

Just eliminate the word "User". It will work.

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