33

How can I encode an integer with base 36 in Python and then decode it again?

37

Have you tried Wikipedia's sample code?

def base36encode(number, alphabet='0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ'):
    """Converts an integer to a base36 string."""
    if not isinstance(number, (int, long)):
        raise TypeError('number must be an integer')

    base36 = ''
    sign = ''

    if number < 0:
        sign = '-'
        number = -number

    if 0 <= number < len(alphabet):
        return sign + alphabet[number]

    while number != 0:
        number, i = divmod(number, len(alphabet))
        base36 = alphabet[i] + base36

    return sign + base36

def base36decode(number):
    return int(number, 36)

print base36encode(1412823931503067241)
print base36decode('AQF8AA0006EH')
  • 25
    Christ if they can do str->int in any base, you'd think they'd let you do int->str in any base with a builtin... – Dubslow Aug 18 '12 at 23:26
  • 4
    to make it even more pythonic, add import of string and replace alphabet value with string.digits+string.lowercase – DataGreed Mar 8 '16 at 15:33
  • 4
    interface between base36encode and base36decode is broken, the latter will fail (possibly silently) to decode anything encoded with custom alphabet argument – Grozz Oct 31 '16 at 15:20
  • 3
    The encoding function allows the user to specify an alphabet, while the decoding function does not, therefore the decoding function is not a true inverse of the encoding function as it relies on the default alphabet. – Fredrick Brennan Sep 28 '17 at 13:36
31

I wish I had read this before. Here is the answer:

def base36encode(number):
    if not isinstance(number, (int, long)):
        raise TypeError('number must be an integer')
    if number < 0:
        raise ValueError('number must be positive')

    alphabet, base36 = ['0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ', '']

    while number:
        number, i = divmod(number, 36)
        base36 = alphabet[i] + base36

    return base36 or alphabet[0]


def base36decode(number):
    return int(number, 36)

print(base36encode(1412823931503067241))
print(base36decode('AQF8AA0006EH'))
20
from numpy import base_repr

num = base_repr(num, 36)
num = int(num, 36)

Here is information about numpy.base_repr.

11

terrible answer, but was just playing around with this an thought i'd share.

import string, math

int2base = lambda a, b: ''.join(
    [(string.digits +
      string.ascii_lowercase +
      string.ascii_uppercase)[(a // b ** i) % b]
     for i in range(int(math.log(a, b)), -1, -1)]
)

num = 1412823931503067241
test = int2base(num, 36)
test2 = int(test, 36)
print test2 == num
  • I like this quite a bit, but perhaps I just have a weakness for shorter code. – Nick Russo Aug 27 '14 at 13:58
  • 5
    math.log returns a limited-precision float, so round to 14 digits before truncating the fractional part. This avoids turning 5.999999999999999 into 5.0, for instance. – Nick Russo Sep 12 '14 at 15:01
  • 1
    math.log() fails when a==0 and using it sucks anyway. – Zdeněk Pavlas Jan 24 '18 at 12:44
10

You can use numpy's base_repr(...) for this.

import numpy as np

num = 2017

num = np.base_repr(num, 36)
print(num)  # 1K1

num = int(num, 36)
print(num)  # 2017

Here is some information about numpy, int(x, base=10), and np.base_repr(number, base=2, padding=0).

(This answer was originally submitted as an edit to @christopher-beland's answer, but was rejected in favor of its own answer.)

8

You could use https://github.com/tonyseek/python-base36.

$ pip install base36

and then

>>> import base36
>>> assert base36.dumps(19930503) == 'bv6h3'
>>> assert base36.loads('bv6h3') == 19930503
  • 1
    This is the right answer. I don't know why everyone else wants to reinvent the wheel. – Michael Scheper Aug 7 '17 at 19:03
  • 1
    @MichaelScheper Because dependencies are hard. See leftpad. Copy and pasting a trivial function to a file that does what you want is sometimes better than adding a new external dependency. – mbarkhau Nov 13 '17 at 11:19
  • 1
    @mbarkhau You could download third dependencies to your repository vendor or your private PyPI mirror (just like Golang projects). It may be better than just copy-paste code snippets, for separated test coverage and release plan. – Jiangge Zhang Nov 14 '17 at 10:37
2

This works if you only care about positive integers.

def int_to_base36(num):
    """Converts a positive integer into a base36 string."""
    assert num >= 0
    digits = '0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ'

    res = ''
    while not res or num > 0:
        num, i = divmod(num, 36)
        res = digits[i] + res
    return res

To convert back to int, just use int(num, 36). For a conversion of arbitrary bases see https://gist.github.com/mbarkhau/1b918cb3b4a2bdaf841c

1

I benchmarked the example encoders provided in answers to this question. On my Ubuntu 18.10 laptop, Python 3.7, Jupyter, the %%timeit magic command, and the integer 4242424242424242 as the input, I got these results:

  • Wikipedia's sample code: 4.87 µs ± 300 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)
  • @mistero's base36encode(): 3.62 µs ± 44.2 ns per loop
  • @user1036542's int2base: 10 µs ± 400 ns per loop (after fixing py37 compatibility)
  • @mbarkhau's int_to_base36(): 3.83 µs ± 28.8 ns per loop

All timings were mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each.

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