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I am shipping software licensed under the MIT license.

Under the application tree, I have also a file that is part of the software. Inside of this file there are the exact contents of an external library, licensed under GPL. There is also other code (by me), licensed under the MIT license. The section of this file that contains the library is left intact and the library is not altered.

Can I release my software under the MIT license? Should I include the GPL license (I'm quite sure the answer is yes)? Should I also include a README with indications such as "the part of the file X is licensed under the GPL license as it is an external library, the rest is MIT"?

closed as off-topic by JasonMArcher, CRABOLO, HaveNoDisplayName, Peter Pei Guo, rob Jun 7 '15 at 0:39

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  • Are the MIT-licensed and the GPL-licensed parts linked (statically OR dynamically)? – user395760 Aug 5 '12 at 20:32
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    I'm not sure if this is what you mean: they are linked during a "build" phase by a script. The "release" package contains both parts in the same file. – Donovan Aug 5 '12 at 20:35
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    Then you may violate the GPL by mixing it with non-GPL code. Re-examine the license terms, or at least read the GNU's FAQ on the GPL. – user395760 Aug 5 '12 at 21:25
  • Thank you @delnan. There is a question in the faq that says: "If a library is released under the GPL (not the LGPL), does that mean that any software which uses it has to be under the GPL or a GPL-compatible license?". The answer of this question is "Yes". Then how come there is non open-source software (for example, web Kirby or Mac Ulysses) that make use of GPL software (for example, Markdown)? – Donovan Aug 6 '12 at 9:53
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about licensing or legal issues, not programming or software development. See here for details, and the help center for more. – JasonMArcher Jun 6 '15 at 23:28
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Can I release my software under the MIT license?

If you use GPL'ed software in your software (bring together two works) and you then distribute the new work, you have to distribute it under GPL (copyleft).

There are different flavors of GPL which has a different effect on how the copyleft works (GPL, LGPL, AGPL), so if you need more info, you need to be more specific.

Should I include the GPL license (I'm quite sure the answer is yes)?

Yes. Any of the GPL licenses requires this.

Should I also include a README with indications such as "the part of the file X is licensed under the GPL license as it is an external library, the rest is MIT"?

Yes, that is useful. However, if it is really GPL, keep in mind that next to what you write is correct, the whole package has to be distributed under GPL.

See as well

1

If you own the code, if the property of the code belongs to you, you are free to change the license everytime and each time you want to, you can also release the same code under more than 1 license.

When redistributing the code obtained from a third part that is released under a GPL license, the only thing that you have to do is to left the terms of the license unchanged because the GPL is intended this way. the GPL stays GPL no matter how many developers or subjects are involved in the "distribution chain".

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