I want to write a ruby program that steps over space in an arbitrary number of dimensions.

In 3 dimensions what I'm doing looks like this:

x_range = (-1..1)
y_range = (-1..1)
z_range = (-1..1)

step_size = 0.01

x_range.step(step_size) do |x|
  y_range.step(step_size) do |y|
    z_range.step(step_size) do |z|

      # do something with the point x,y,z

    end  
  end
end

I want to do the same for n dimensions

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Recursion could solve this kind of problem easily and perfectly. Code below fits any number of dimensions, and also various length of ranges.

def traversal(ranges, step_size, conjunction = [], &blk)
  ranges[0].step(step_size) do |x|
    conjunction.push(x)
    if ranges.size > 1
      traversal(ranges[1..-1], step_size, conjunction, &blk)
    else
      blk.call(conjunction) if block_given?
      conjunction.pop
    end
  end
  conjunction.pop
end

Run: (dimension = 4, length = 3, 3, 4, 2)

x = (1..3)
y = (4..6)
z = (7..10)
w = (100..101)
test_data = [x, y, z, w]
step_size = 1

traversal(test_data, step_size) do |x|
  puts "Point: #{x.join('-')}"
end

Output: (72 points in total, which is 3 * 3 * 4 * 2)

Point: 1-4-7-100
Point: 1-4-7-101
Point: 1-4-8-100
Point: 1-4-8-101
Point: 1-4-9-100
Point: 1-4-9-101
Point: 1-4-10-100
Point: 1-4-10-101
Point: 1-5-7-100
Point: 1-5-7-101
Point: 1-5-8-100
Point: 1-5-8-101
Point: 1-5-9-100
Point: 1-5-9-101
Point: 1-5-10-100
Point: 1-5-10-101
Point: 1-6-7-100
Point: 1-6-7-101
Point: 1-6-8-100
Point: 1-6-8-101
Point: 1-6-9-100
Point: 1-6-9-101
Point: 1-6-10-100
Point: 1-6-10-101
Point: 2-4-7-100
Point: 2-4-7-101
Point: 2-4-8-100
Point: 2-4-8-101
Point: 2-4-9-100
Point: 2-4-9-101
Point: 2-4-10-100
Point: 2-4-10-101
Point: 2-5-7-100
Point: 2-5-7-101
Point: 2-5-8-100
Point: 2-5-8-101
Point: 2-5-9-100
Point: 2-5-9-101
Point: 2-5-10-100
Point: 2-5-10-101
Point: 2-6-7-100
Point: 2-6-7-101
Point: 2-6-8-100
Point: 2-6-8-101
Point: 2-6-9-100
Point: 2-6-9-101
Point: 2-6-10-100
Point: 2-6-10-101
Point: 3-4-7-100
Point: 3-4-7-101
Point: 3-4-8-100
Point: 3-4-8-101
Point: 3-4-9-100
Point: 3-4-9-101
Point: 3-4-10-100
Point: 3-4-10-101
Point: 3-5-7-100
Point: 3-5-7-101
Point: 3-5-8-100
Point: 3-5-8-101
Point: 3-5-9-100
Point: 3-5-9-101
Point: 3-5-10-100
Point: 3-5-10-101
Point: 3-6-7-100
Point: 3-6-7-101
Point: 3-6-8-100
Point: 3-6-8-101
Point: 3-6-9-100
Point: 3-6-9-101
Point: 3-6-10-100
Point: 3-6-10-101

This is the first thing that comes to mind for me:

def enumerate(nDimens, bottom, top, step_size)
  bottom = (bottom / step_size).to_i
  top    = (top    / step_size).to_i

  range = (bottom..top).to_a.map{ |x| x * step_size }
  return range.repeated_permutation(nDimens)
end

stepper = enumerate(4, -1, 1, 0.1)

loop do
  puts "#{stepper.next()}"
end

This produces:

[-1.0, -1.0, -1.0, -1.0]
[-1.0, -1.0, -1.0, -0.9]
[-1.0, -1.0, -1.0, -0.8]
# Lots more...
[1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 0.8]
[1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 0.9]
[1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0]

This assumes all dimensions have the same range, but it'd be easy to adjust if for some reason that doesn't hold.

If ranges are not too big you can do something like this:

n = 5 # 5 dimentions
x = (-1..1).to_a
x.product(*[x]*(n-1)).each {|i| p i}

Result:

[-1, -1, -1, -1, -1]
[-1, -1, -1, -1, 0]
[-1, -1, -1, -1, 1]
[-1, -1, -1, 0, -1]
[-1, -1, -1, 0, 0]
[-1, -1, -1, 0, 1]
[-1, -1, -1, 1, -1]
[-1, -1, -1, 1, 0]
[-1, -1, -1, 1, 1]
[-1, -1, 0, -1, -1]
[-1, -1, 0, -1, 0]
# skipped

This is what you could do... here is an example iterator.

#next(l[dim] array of lower ranges ,h[dim] = upper ranges, step[dim], dim = dimensions -1, curr[dim] = current state in dim dimensions )
def nextx(l ,h, step, dim, curr)
    x = dim
    update= false
    while (update==false)
        if curr[x] == h[x]
            if x > 0
                x = x-1
            else
                exit
            end

        else
            curr[x]= curr[x]+step[x]
            while (x < dim)
                x = x+1
                curr[x] = l[x]  
            end
            update = true
        end
    end
    return curr
end


l = [0,0,0]
h = [3,3,3]
step = [1,1,1]
currx = [0,0,2]

i = 0
while i < 70
    currx = nextx(l, h, step, 2, currx)
    puts currx.inspect
    i=i+1
end

This is typically encountered in algorithms that explore a search space. The do loops are creating a product space from the one dimensional ranges.

First pack as many ranges are needed into an array e.g.

search_space_1Ds = [x_range.step(step_size).to_a, y_range.step(step_size).to_a, z_range.step(step_size).to_a]

then the following will work with an arbitrary number of dimensions.

search_space = search_spaces_1Ds.shift.product(*search_space_1Ds)
search_space.map do |vec|
  # calculate something with vec
end

This implementation is not only concise, it makes it very clear what your algorithm is doing; enumerating through a search space that is created as the product space of the one dimensional search spaces.

  • product is an undefined method for a Range – steenslag Dec 6 at 23:37
  • Thanks, steenslag, I have corrected accordingly – Obromios Dec 7 at 0:08

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