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I'm doing some tutorials online...and I'm stuck at an exercise:Define a function postalValidate(S) which first checks if S represents a postal code which is valid. Note: I'm supposed to solve it with strings, lists, if statements, loops, and other basic constructs like variables and functions.

first, delete all spaces; the remainder must be of the form L#L#L# where L are letters (in either lower or upper case) and # are numbers.

If S is not a valid postal code, return the boolean False. If S is valid, return a version of the same postal code in the nice format L#L#L# where each L is capital.

I've created a code for these exercise, but the grader said that is wrong, however I will post it too.

def postalValidate(S):
   while " " in S:
     S.remove(" ")
   for i in range(1,6,2):
     S.isdigit(S[i])
   for j in range(0,5,2):
     S.upper(S[j]
     S.isalpha(S[j])
   return True
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  • 2
    You can use replace() for what your while loop does. Also, don't you want to return False in some case too? – Levon Aug 6 '12 at 16:41
  • I asked to return the True, if the true is that is false, than it would return false...I think... – Reginald Aug 6 '12 at 16:46
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This is clearly a job for regular expressions, although I don't know if you're supposed to use them in the exercise...

I'm posting this as an answer just in case you can. Otherwise, let us know...

#/usr/bin/evn python

import re
zipCode = re.compile(r"\s*(\w\d\s*){3}\s*")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    samples = [
        "           44F 4 F", #Invalid
        "  L0L0L0    ", #Valid
        "  L0  L0  L0    ", #Valid
    ]

    for sample in samples:
        if zipCode.match(sample):
            print "The string %s is a valid zipCode (nice and clean: %s)" % (sample, sample.replace(" ", "").upper())
        else:
            print "The string %s is NOT a valid zipCode" % sample

Edit:

Since you can not use regular expressions, I'd recommend you change the way of thinking... Instead of checking if the characters belong to a valid postal code, I'd recommend you do the opposite: check if they DON'T belong in a valid postal code, returning False as soon as you detect a misplaced (or wrong) character:

def postalValidate(S):
    S = S.upper().replace(" ", "")
    if len(S) == 6:
        for i in range(len(S)):
            if i % 2 == 0:
                #Even index (0, 2, 4, 6...) , has to be 'letter'
                if not(S[i].isalpha()):
                    return False 
            else:
                #Odd index (1, 3, 5, 7...), must be 'number'
                if not(S[i].isdigit()):
                    return False

    else:
        #You can save some cpu ticks here... at this point, the string has to be of length 6 or you know it's not a zip
        return False
    return S

The return statement stops the execution of the current function so as soon as you realize that there's something "wrong" with the string to check, you can return False (there's no point on keeping checking once you know it's not valid, right?)

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  • I'm not allowed to use these on it...I'm supposed to solve it with string,lists,if statements and loops, and other basic knowledges like variables and functions ... – Reginald Aug 6 '12 at 17:02
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    @Reginald you should update your post to mention this restriction - not everyone will read every comment :) – Levon Aug 6 '12 at 17:04
  • \w matches digits as well as letters, and you probably want to ensure that there isn't any trailing garbage after the match, so I suggest \s*([a-zA-Z]\s*\d\s*){3}$ – Gareth Rees Sep 14 '12 at 17:33
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I happened to be working on the same tutorial, with the same coding constraints. After many hours of head scratching:

def postalValidate(S):
   S = S.replace(" ","") 
   if len(S) != 6 or S.isalpha() or S.isdigit(): 
      return False  
   if not S[0:5:2].isalpha(): 
      return False  
   if not S[1:6:2].isdigit(): 
      return False 
   return S.upper()  
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I am not posting the exact code, but just the algorithm. Please read the inline comments. (Note: The below is not python code..)

def postalValidate(S):
   while " " in S:
     S.remove(" ") #Are you sure this will work? Strings are immutable.. You need to assign back to `S`

   for i in range(1,6,2):
     if s[i] is not a digit:
         return False
   for j in range(0,5,2):
     S.upper(S[j]) # you need to assign to S[j] again, plus use ".upper()"
     if S[j] is not alpha:
         return False
   return s.upper() #simple .upper() will do the job.

If you could use re, it will be as simple as:

if re.search(r'^([a-zA-Z][0-9]){3}$', s.strip()):
    return s.strip().upper()
return False
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So presumably S is a String, so I will go off of that. First of all, you're calling isdigit and isalpha wrong, and second of all you're never returning false if it isn't a valid postal code. return True always returns True no matter what happens in your code. Here's what I think you're trying to do:

def postal_validate(s):
    s = s.replace(' ', '')
    for i in range(1,6,2):
        if (not s[i].isdigit()):
            return False
    for i in range(0,5,2):
        if (not s[i].isalpha()):
           return False
    return s.upper()

I could be wrong, of course.

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  • Therw's also a requirement about returning the reformatted postage code (though of course it's the OP's responsibility to try it, not yours) – David Robinson Aug 6 '12 at 17:03
  • That's as simple as returning s.upper() instead of True at the end. I was having trouble identifying exactly what OP needed. – DrGodCarl Aug 6 '12 at 17:06
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import re
def postalValid(S):
    spaceless = S.replace(' ','')
    if not re.match(r"[a-zA-Z][0-9]+[a-zA-Z][0-9]+[a-zA-Z][0-9]+",spaceless):
       return False
    return spaceless.upper()

regular expressions (the python re module) look for patterns in strings.

[a-zA-Z] will match exactly 1 letter

[0-9]+ will match one or more digits (ie 0,9,99,9999) ... if you just want one digit just get rid of the plus operator in [0-9]+ and make it [0-9] which will match exactly one digit

so [a-zA-Z][0-9]+[a-zA-Z][0-9]+[a-zA-Z][0-9]+ matches one letter followed by a number (multidigit number is fine) followed by a letter followed by another number followed by another letter and ending with a number

If you cannot use the regular expressions then you could do

def postalValid(S):
    no_spaces = S.replace(" ","")
    if len(no_spaces ) > 6: return false
    for i in range(6):
        if i%2:
           if not no_spaces[i].isdigit():return False
        else:
           if not no_spaces[i].isalpha():return False

     return no_spaces.upper() #True

but that assumes each number is only a single digit

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  • I think it might be helpful to OP to provide some explanation (esp about the re) – Levon Aug 6 '12 at 17:01
1

Here's a relatively simple way to write and validate the exercise function. First space characters are removed from the string argument, which makes a local copy of it in the process. A boolean value is then returned depending to whether each of the subexpressions in the somewhat long logical expression evaluate to True.

def postalValidate(s):
    s = s.replace(" ", "")
    return(len(s) == 6 and
           all(s[i].isdigit() for i in range(1, 6, 2)) and
           all(s[i].isalpha() for i in range(0, 5, 2)))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    for testcase in 'a1b2c3', '980222', 'A456C7':
        print('postalValidate({!r}) -> {}'.format(testcase,
                                                  postalValidate(testcase)))

Output:

postalValidate('a1b2c3') -> True
postalValidate('980222') -> False
postalValidate('A456C7') -> False
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import re

regex ="[a-zA-Z]+\d+[a-zA-Z]+\d+[a-zA-Z]+\d+"

def ispostal(v):
    v = re.sub('\s+', '', v)
    if re.match(regex, v):
        return v.upper()
    else:
        return False
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  • 3
    I think it might be helpful to OP to provide some explanation (esp about the re) – Levon Aug 6 '12 at 17:01
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I know it’s too late, but let me try to answer the question as I’m just finished working on the same exercise.

According to the exercise, define a function postalValidate(S) which first checks if S represents a postal code (Canadian) which is valid:

  • first, delete all spaces;

  • the remainder must be of the form L#L#L# where L are letters (in
    either lower or upper case) and # are numbers.

If S is not a valid postal code, return the boolean False. If S is valid, return a version of the same postal code in the nice format L#L#L# where each L is capital.

The following methods that they’ve just covered are supposed to be used:

str.replace(), str.isalpha(), str.isdigit(), and str.upper()

Their site doesn't allow importing modules, so regular expressions cannot be used.

Here’s my code:

def postalValidate(S):
   S = S.replace(' ', '')
   if len(S) == 6:
      if S[::2].isalpha() and S[1::2].isdigit(): # slicing with step
         return S.upper()
      else:
         return False
   else:
      return False

Test runs include these arguments: ‘H0H0H0’, ‘postal’, ‘ d3 L3 T3’, ‘ 3d3 L3 T’, ‘’, ‘n21 3g1z’, ‘V4L1D’, ‘K1A 0A3’, ‘H0H0H’

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