4218

I'd like to round at most two decimal places, but only if necessary.

Input:

10
1.7777777
9.1

Output:

10
1.78
9.1

How can I do this in JavaScript?

5
  • 1
    const formattedNumber = Math.round(myNumber * 100) / 100; Commented Oct 5, 2022 at 17:28
  • const myNumber = 1.275; const formattedNumber = new Intl.NumberFormat('en', { minimumFractionDigits: 2, maximumFractionDigits: 2 }).format(myNumber); const formattedNumberInNumber = parseFloat(formattedNumber); // #=> 1.28. more
    – tinystone
    Commented Mar 12, 2023 at 9:38
  • ATTENTION: this thread is full of Number.EPSILON wishful thinking. It doesn't work, it cannot work in all cases. Do yourself a favor and get a proper decimal/big library. E.g. in MikeMcl/big.js it will be: x = new Big(num_or_better_verbatim_str).round(2) then +x or x.toString(), depending on what's next. Commented Jan 5 at 4:57
  • ... Answers containing + Number.EPSILON itt lack knowledge on how FPU works and don't cover all cases, even trivial ones. Before taking them seriously, please test this in console: write Math.round((1.005 + Number.EPSILON) * 100) / 100 and start adding zeroes between 1 and '.'. You can play with where to put EPSILON too, to empirically see that these theories are JUST WRONG. JS numbers are FPU numbers. They aren't your pocket calc numbers, never were, and never will be. The +"e+2" part I don't even want to comment. Commented Jan 5 at 4:58
  • 1
    I went through all the hoops with rounding errors in JS because we had the bad idea to write an accounting software in this language :D We ended up using npmjs.com/package/currency.js because all calculations described as answers here left room for errors. Commented Feb 2 at 9:46

94 Answers 94

18
var roundUpto = function(number, upto){
    return Number(number.toFixed(upto));
}
roundUpto(0.1464676, 2);

toFixed(2): Here 2 is the number of digits up to which we want to round this number.

2
  • this .toFixed() is more simple to implement. just go through it once. Commented May 15, 2015 at 7:19
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., what does this "Number" function do? Why is it required? What is the idea/gist? Some more input and output values would also be good, e.g. the previously mentioned 1.005. From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Commented May 5, 2022 at 16:41
17

2022, native, without library, modern browser, clear and readable.

function round(
  value,
  minimumFractionDigits,
  maximumFractionDigits
) {
  const formattedValue = value.toLocaleString('en', {
    useGrouping: false,
    minimumFractionDigits,
    maximumFractionDigits
  })
  return Number(formattedValue)
}

console.log(round(21.891, 2, 3)) // 21.891
console.log(round(1.8, 2)) // 1.8, if you need 1.80, remove the `Number` function. Return directly the `formattedValue`.
console.log(round(21.0001, 0, 1)) // 21
console.log(round(0.875, 3)) // 0.875

2
  • 3
    Run this and see that results are not like you've written
    – Royi Namir
    Commented Apr 9, 2022 at 14:06
  • 3
    What is the gist of it? What is toLocaleString() supposed to do? Does it work for the number 1.015? Why is Number() required? An explanation would be in order. From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Commented May 5, 2022 at 18:10
15

Use something like this "parseFloat(parseFloat(value).toFixed(2))"

parseFloat(parseFloat("1.7777777").toFixed(2))-->1.78 
parseFloat(parseFloat("10").toFixed(2))-->10 
parseFloat(parseFloat("9.1").toFixed(2))-->9.1
1
  • 1
    not if the inaccuracy is intrinsic to the float representation. you would just be removing it and then reintroducing the same error by converting back to float again! Commented Oct 28, 2018 at 20:00
14

Here is a prototype method:

Number.prototype.round = function(places){
    places = Math.pow(10, places); 
    return Math.round(this * places)/places;
}

var yournum = 10.55555;
yournum = yournum.round(2);
13

To not deal with many 0s, use this variant:

Math.round(num * 1e2) / 1e2
0
12

A different approach is to use a library. Use Lodash:

const _ = require("lodash")
const roundedNumber = _.round(originalNumber, 2)
2
  • At least five previous answers have used Lodash. Commented May 5, 2022 at 17:21
  • In fact, just one, I admit I hadn't see it when I wrote mine. Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 17:45
11

Instead of using Math.round as Brian Ustas suggests, I prefer the Math.trunc approach to fix the the following situation:

const twoDecimalRound = num => Math.round(num * 100) / 100;
const twoDecimalTrunc = num => Math.trunc(num * 100) / 100;
console.info(twoDecimalRound(79.996)); // Not desired output: 80;
console.info(twoDecimalTrunc(79.996)); // Desired output: 79.99;
10

A simpler ES6 way is

const round = (x, n) => 
  Number(parseFloat(Math.round(x * Math.pow(10, n)) / Math.pow(10, n)).toFixed(n));

This pattern also returns the precision asked for.

ex:

round(44.7826456, 4)  // yields 44.7826
round(78.12, 4)       // yields 78.12
2
  • 1
    Unfortunately, your approach adds zeros at the end that are not necessary. I think the solution to the posted question should result in 78.12 instead of 78.1200. Commented Apr 23, 2020 at 16:57
  • @MarcinWanago good catch, I overlooked that in the OP's question. I've updated my example. Thank you.
    – Adam A.
    Commented Apr 29, 2020 at 2:06
10

I reviewed every answer of this post. Here is my take on the matter:

const nbRounds = 7;
const round = (x, n=2) => {
  const precision = Math.pow(10, n)
  return Math.round((x+Number.EPSILON) * precision ) / precision;
}
let i = 0;
while( nbRounds > i++ ) {
  console.log("round(1.00083899, ",i,") > ", round(1.00083899, i))
  console.log("round(1.83999305, ",i,") > ", round(1.83999305, i))
}

1
  • 1
    Can you explain your take? What were the conclusions? Does it work for 1.015 (and other problematic numbers mentioned in comments to the other answers)? Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Commented May 5, 2022 at 17:59
10

If you happen to already be using the D3.js library, they have a powerful number formatting library.

Rounding specifically is at D3 round.

In your case, the answer is:

> d3.round(1.777777, 2)
1.78

> d3.round(1.7, 2)
1.7

> d3.round(1, 2)
1
3
  • 2
    Looking at the source, this is nothing more than a generalized version of @ustasb answer, using num * Math.pow(n) instead of num * 100 (but it's definitely a neat one-liner ;-)
    – svvac
    Commented Jun 18, 2014 at 14:23
  • But documented, and, being in a library, I don't have the same need to check browser compatibility BS. Commented Jun 19, 2014 at 18:11
  • using Math.pow(n) allows for d3.round(12, -1) == 10
    – daviestar
    Commented Aug 5, 2014 at 9:25
9

parseFloat("1.555").toFixed(2); // Returns 1.55 instead of 1.56.

1.55 is the absolute correct result, because there exists no exact representation of 1.555 in the computer. If reading 1.555 it is rounded to the nearest possible value = 1.55499999999999994 (64 bit float). And rounding this number by toFixed(2) results in 1.55.

All other functions provided here give fault result, if the input is 1.55499999999999.

Solution: Append the digit "5" before scanning to rounding up (more exact: rounding away from 0) the number. Do this only, if the number is really a float (has a decimal point).

parseFloat("1.555"+"5").toFixed(2); // Returns 1.56
8

A simple generic solution

const round = (n, dp) => {
  const h = +('1'.padEnd(dp + 1, '0')) // 10 or 100 or 1000 or etc
  return Math.round(n * h) / h
}

console.log('round(2.3454, 3)', round(2.3454, 3)) // 2.345
console.log('round(2.3456, 3)', round(2.3456, 3)) // 2.346
console.log('round(2.3456, 2)', round(2.3456, 2)) // 2.35

Or just use Lodash round which has the same signature - for example, _.round(2.3456, 2)

7

A simple solution would be use Lodash's ceil function if you want to round up...

_.round(6.001, 2)

gives 6

_.ceil(6.001, 2);

gives 6.01

_.ceil(37.4929, 2);

gives 37.5

_.round(37.4929, 2);

gives 37.49

3
  • 3
    There is no sense in importing new dependency, just to make rounding. Commented Aug 2, 2018 at 12:04
  • It is very funny that you don't use lodash already in your javascript project considering the kind of features lodash provides... Commented Aug 2, 2018 at 13:33
  • 1
    which already has native implementation... I'm not saying that lodash (underscore) is useless, I'm just saying, that there is no sense to lodash in case you only need rounding. Of course if you like and use it on everyday basis and whole your project full of lodash calls - it is make sense. Commented Aug 2, 2018 at 14:37
7

Based on the chosen answer and the upvoted comment on the same question:

Math.round((num + 0.00001) * 100) / 100

This works for both these examples:

Math.round((1.005 + 0.00001) * 100) / 100

Math.round((1.0049 + 0.00001) * 100) / 100
1
  • 5
    This function fails for 1.004999
    – Wiimm
    Commented Feb 22, 2019 at 9:10
6

A simple general rounding function could be following:

Steps are:

  1. Multiply the number by (10 to the power of number of decimal place) using Math.pow(10,places).
  2. Round the result to whole integer using Math.Round.
  3. Divide the result back by (10 to the power of number of decimal place) Math.pow(10,places).

Example:

number is: 1.2375 to be rounded to 3 decimal places

  1. 1.2375 * (10^3) ==> 1.2375 * 1000 = 1237.5
  2. Round to integer ==> 1238
  3. Divide 1238 by (10^3) ==> 1238 / 1000 = 1.238

(note: 10^3 means Math.pow(10,3)).

 function numberRoundDecimal(v,n) {
 return Math.round((v+Number.EPSILON)*Math.pow(10,n))/Math.pow(10,n)}


// ------- tests --------
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(-0.024641163062896567,3))  // -0.025
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(0.9993360575508052,3))     // 0.999
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(1.0020739645577939,3))     // 1.002
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(0.975,0))                  // 1
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(0.975,1))                  // 1
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(0.975,2))                  // 0.98
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(1.005,2))                  // 1.01

0
6

I've read all the answers, the answers of similar questions and the complexity of the most "good" solutions didn't satisfy me. I don't want to put a huge round function set, or a small one but fails on scientific notation. So, I came up with this function. It may help someone in my situation:

function round(num, dec) {
   const [sv, ev] = num.toString().split('e');
   return Number(Number(Math.round(parseFloat(sv + 'e' + dec)) + 'e-' + dec) + 'e' + (ev || 0));
}

I didn't run any performance test because I will call this just to update the UI of my application. The function gives the following results for a quick test:

// 1/3563143 = 2.806510993243886e-7
round(1/3563143, 2)  // returns `2.81e-7`

round(1.31645, 4)    // returns 1.3165

round(-17.3954, 2)   // returns -17.4

This is enough for me.

4
  • round(4.45, 0) = 4 expected 5
    – Alex
    Commented Dec 22, 2021 at 10:19
  • @Alex I think you're double-rounding. 4.45 rounds to 4, not 5. Commented Feb 6, 2022 at 14:00
  • Those test cases are the easy ones. What about 1.015 and other problematic numbers mentioned in the other answers and their comments? Commented May 5, 2022 at 18:00
  • @Peter, it rounds well? Did you check it? What's the problem?
    – superkeci
    Commented May 19, 2022 at 15:26
6

Another approach to this:

number = 16.6666666;
console.log(parseFloat(number.toFixed(2)));
"16.67"

number = 16.6;
console.log(parseFloat(number.toFixed(2)));
"16.6"

number = 16;
console.log(parseFloat(number.toFixed(2)));
"16"

.toFixed(2) returns a string with exactly two decimal points, that may or may not be trailing zeros. Doing a parseFloat() will eliminate those trailing zeros.

6

This did the trick for me (TypeScript):

round(decimal: number, decimalPoints: number): number{
    let roundedValue = Math.round(decimal * Math.pow(10, decimalPoints)) / Math.pow(10, decimalPoints);

    console.log(`Rounded ${decimal} to ${roundedValue}`);
    return roundedValue;
}

Sample output

Rounded 18.339840000000436 to 18.34
Rounded 52.48283999999984 to 52.48
Rounded 57.24612000000036 to 57.25
Rounded 23.068320000000142 to 23.07
Rounded 7.792980000000398 to 7.79
Rounded 31.54157999999981 to 31.54
Rounded 36.79686000000004 to 36.8
Rounded 34.723080000000124 to 34.72
Rounded 8.4375 to 8.44
Rounded 15.666960000000074 to 15.67
Rounded 29.531279999999924 to 29.53
Rounded 8.277420000000006 to 8.28
6

The question is to round to two decimals.

Let’s not make this complicated, modifying prototype chain, etc.

Here is one-line solution

let round2dec = num => Math.round(num * 100) / 100;

console.log(round2dec(1.77));
console.log(round2dec(1.774));
console.log(round2dec(1.777));
console.log(round2dec(10));

6

The mathematical floor and round definitions:

Enter image description here

lead us to

let round= x=> ( x+0.005 - (x+0.005)%0.01 +'' ).replace(/(\...)(.*)/,'$1');

// for a case like 1.384 we need to use a regexp to get only 2 digits after the dot
// and cut off machine-error (epsilon)

console.log(round(10));
console.log(round(1.7777777));
console.log(round(1.7747777));
console.log(round(1.384));

6

This function works for me. You just pass in the number and the places you want to round and it does what it needs to do easily.

round(source, n) {
  let places = Math.pow(10, n);

  return Math.round(source * places) / places;
}
4
  • This approach works well, thanks. (Note: doing the opposite does not work well, e.g.: Math.round(5.3473483447 / 0.000001) * 0.000001 == 5.347347999999999).
    – Andrew
    Commented May 14, 2020 at 2:51
  • It may work for you, but does it answer the question? Commented May 5, 2022 at 17:56
  • 1
    @Alex Why do you expect 4.45 to round up to 5? It's less than 4.5.
    – rrauenza
    Commented Sep 9, 2022 at 20:27
  • 1
    @rrauenza you are right.. I don't know why I thought that it was not a correct answer :) Looks right to me. Comment removed.
    – Alex
    Commented Oct 18, 2022 at 18:00
5

To round at decimal positions pos (including no decimals) do Math.round(num * Math.pow(10,pos)) / Math.pow(10,pos)

var console = {
 log: function(s) {
  document.getElementById("console").innerHTML += s + "<br/>"
 }
}
var roundDecimals=function(num,pos) {
 return (Math.round(num * Math.pow(10,pos)) / Math.pow(10,pos) );
}
//https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi
var pi=3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510;
for(var i=2;i<15;i++) console.log("pi="+roundDecimals(pi,i));
for(var i=15;i>=0;--i) console.log("pi="+roundDecimals(pi,i));
<div id="console" />

1
  • 1
    Wrong. Try 1.015 Commented Sep 18, 2019 at 13:39
5

I know there are many answers, but most of them have side effect in some specific cases.

Easiest and shortest solution without any side effects is following:

Number((2.3456789).toFixed(2)) // 2.35

It rounds properly and returns number instead of string

console.log(Number((2.345).toFixed(2)))  // 2.35
console.log(Number((2.344).toFixed(2)))  // 2.34
console.log(Number((2).toFixed(2)))      // 2
console.log(Number((-2).toFixed(2)))     // -2
console.log(Number((-2.345).toFixed(2))) // -2.35

console.log(Number((2.345678).toFixed(3))) // 2.346
1
  • 5
    console.log(Number((1.005).toFixed(2))) still gives "1.00" instead of "1.01"
    – Eagle
    Commented Apr 10, 2018 at 20:05
4

You could also override the Math.round function to do the rounding correct and add a parameter for decimals and use it like: Math.round(Number, Decimals). Keep in mind that this overrides the built in component Math.round and giving it another property then it original is.

var round = Math.round;
Math.round = function (value, decimals) {
  decimals = decimals || 0;
  return Number(round(value + 'e' + decimals) + 'e-' + decimals);
}

Then you can simply use it like this:

Math.round(1.005, 2);

https://jsfiddle.net/k5tpq3pd/3/

0
4

Try to use the jQuery .number plug-in:

var number = 19.8000000007;
var res = 1 * $.number(number, 2);
4

I was building a simple tipCalculator and there was a lot of answers here that seemed to overcomplicate the issue. So I found summarizing the issue to be the best way to truly answer this question.

If you want to create a rounded decimal number, first you call toFixed(# of decimal places you want to keep) and then wrap that in a Number().

So the end result:

let amountDue = 286.44;
tip = Number((amountDue * 0.2).toFixed(2));
console.log(tip)  // 57.29 instead of 57.288
2
  • This does not answer the question, which was about rounding and getting back a number. toFixed simply truncates the value and returns a string. Number(1.005).toFixed(2) => "1.00"
    – brainbag
    Commented Jul 17, 2018 at 22:10
  • And this solution also doesn't go with the "only if necessary" part of the question: Number(10).toFixed(2) => "10.00"
    – GriffoGoes
    Commented Oct 24, 2018 at 19:36
4

The rounding problem can be avoided by using numbers represented in exponential notation.

public roundFinancial(amount: number, decimals: number) {
    return Number(Math.round(Number(`${amount}e${decimals}`)) + `e-${decimals}`);
}
2
  • 1
    this doesn't look like javascript to me, and chrome doesn't accept it - VM82:1 Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected identifier
    – hanshenrik
    Commented Oct 16, 2018 at 16:03
  • This is TypeScript, but after changing to function round(amount, decimals) { return Number(Math.round(Number(`${amount}e${decimals}`)) + `e-${decimals}`); } it seems to do the job well. Commented Aug 28, 2019 at 16:19
3

Here is a function I came up with to do "round up". I used double Math.round to compensate for JavaScript's inaccurate multiplying, so 1.005 will be correctly rounded as 1.01.

function myRound(number, decimalplaces){
    if(decimalplaces > 0){
        var multiply1 = Math.pow(10,(decimalplaces + 4));
        var divide1 = Math.pow(10, decimalplaces);
        return Math.round(Math.round(number * multiply1)/10000 )/divide1;
    }
    if(decimalplaces < 0){
        var divide2 = Math.pow(10, Math.abs(decimalplaces));
        var multiply2 = Math.pow(10, Math.abs(decimalplaces));
        return Math.round(Math.round(number / divide2) * multiply2);
    }
    return Math.round(number);
}
2
  • 1
    I tested it again, and it works for me.. (alert( myRound(1234.56789, 2) ); //1234.57 ) May-be you get confused by multiple "return" statements?
    – Andrei
    Commented Sep 19, 2013 at 6:18
  • An upvote as this maybe a long winded way of doing it but it works.
    – Ashutosh
    Commented May 26, 2014 at 10:52
3

I wrote the following set of functions for myself. Maybe it will help you too.

function float_exponent(number) {
    exponent = 1;
    while (number < 1.0) {
        exponent += 1
        number *= 10
    }
    return exponent;
}
function format_float(number, extra_precision) {
    precision = float_exponent(number) + (extra_precision || 0)
    return number.toFixed(precision).split(/\.?0+$/)[0]
}

Usage:

format_float(1.01); // 1
format_float(1.06); // 1.1
format_float(0.126); // 0.13
format_float(0.000189); // 0.00019

For you case:

format_float(10, 1); // 10
format_float(9.1, 1); // 9.1
format_float(1.77777, 1); // 1.78
3

The big challenge on this seemingly simple task is that we want it to yield psychologically expected results even if the input contains minimal rounding errors to start with (not mentioning the errors which will happen within our calculation). If we know that the real result is exactly 1.005, we expect that rounding to two digits yields 1.01, even if the 1.005 is the result of a large computation with loads of rounding errors on the way.

The problem becomes even more obvious when dealing with floor() instead of round(). For example, when cutting everything away after the last two digits behind the dot of 33.3, we would certainly not expect to get 33.29 as a result, but that is what happens:

console.log(Math.floor(33.3 * 100) / 100)

In simple cases, the solution is to perform calculation on strings instead of floating point numbers, and thus avoid rounding errors completely. However, this option fails at the first non-trivial mathematical operation (including most divsions), and it is slow.

When operating on floating point numbers, the solution is to introduce a parameter which names the amount by which we are willing to deviate from the actual computation result, in order to output the psychologically expected result.

var round = function(num, digits = 2, compensateErrors = 2) {
  if (num < 0) {
    return -this.round(-num, digits, compensateErrors);
  }
  const pow = Math.pow(10, digits);
  return (Math.round(num * pow * (1 + compensateErrors * Number.EPSILON)) / pow);
}

/* --- testing --- */

console.log("Edge cases mentioned in this thread:")
var values = [ 0.015, 1.005, 5.555, 156893.145, 362.42499999999995, 1.275, 1.27499, 1.2345678e+2, 2.175, 5.015, 58.9 * 0.15 ];
values.forEach((n) => {
  console.log(n + " -> " + round(n));
  console.log(-n + " -> " + round(-n));
});

console.log("\nFor numbers which are so large that rounding cannot be performed anyway within computation precision, only string-based computation can help.")
console.log("Standard: " + round(1e+19));
console.log("Compensation = 1: " + round(1e+19, 2, 1));
console.log("Effectively no compensation: " + round(1e+19, 2, 0.4));

Note: Internet Explorer does not know Number.EPSILON. If you are in the unhappy position of still having to support it, you can use a shim, or just define the constant yourself for that specific browser family.

1
  • This looks a little better for me: ts function round(num: number, digits: number = 2, compensate: number = 2) { const multiplier = (num >= 0 ? 1 : -1) * 10 ** digits; return (Math.round(num * multiplier * (1 + compensate * Number.EPSILON)) / multiplier); }
    – Filyus
    Commented Jan 4 at 12:59

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