2939

I'd like to round at most 2 decimal places, but only if necessary.

Input:

10
1.7777777
9.1

Output:

10
1.78
9.1

How can I do this in JavaScript?

  • 24
    I made a fiddle with many of the techniques offered as solutions here ... so you can compare: fiddle – dsdsdsdsd Nov 18 '13 at 9:45
  • 45
    No one seems to be aware of Number.EPSILON. Use Math.round( num * 100 + Number.EPSILON ) / 100. – cronvel Jan 18 '17 at 9:59
  • 4
    For new readers, you can't do this unless you have a string type result. Floating point maths on binary internal representations of numbers means there are always numbers that cannot be represented as neat decimals. – Walf Feb 20 '18 at 1:42
  • 10
    @cronvel Can you explain the reason of using Number.EPSILON here? – Bruce Sun Oct 19 '18 at 3:10
  • 8
    I fell down the rabbit hole and tested some of the more interesting answers on this page (first page only). Here's a Codepen. Hint: the more upvotes the answer has, the lower are chances it works properly. – Adam Jagosz Aug 28 '19 at 16:39

80 Answers 80

3759

Use Math.round(num * 100) / 100

Edit: to ensure things like 1.005 round correctly, we use

Math.round((num + Number.EPSILON) * 100) / 100

| improve this answer | |
  • 407
    While this will work for most cases, it will not work for 1.005 which will end up coming out to be 1 instead of 1.01 – James Jun 13 '13 at 14:33
  • 87
    @James Wow that's really weird- I'm working in the Chrome dev console and I'm noticing that 1.005 * 100 = 100.49999999999999. Math.round(100.49999999999999) evaluates to 100, whereas Math.round(100.5) evaluates to 101. IE9 does the same thing. This is due to floating point weirdness in javascript – stinkycheeseman Jul 26 '13 at 17:32
  • 156
    A simple workaround. For 2 d.p., use Math.round((num + 0.00001) * 100) / 100. Try Math.round((1.005 + 0.00001) * 100) / 100 and Math.round((1.0049 + 0.00001) * 100) / 100 – mrkschan Oct 9 '13 at 7:01
  • 32
    @mrkschan Why does that work, and is that foolproof for all numbers? – CMCDragonkai Mar 3 '14 at 4:45
  • 95
    For those of you that don't get it this technique is called scaling. Basically what the answer does here is bring two figures across the decimal point turning the figure into a whole number to avoid all the crazy floating point issues, round that and then translate it back into what it was before by dividing by 100 and you have your answer to 2dp. – Alex_Nabu Nov 14 '14 at 18:15
3211

If the value is a text type:

parseFloat("123.456").toFixed(2);

If the value is a number:

var numb = 123.23454;
numb = numb.toFixed(2);

There is a downside that values like 1.5 will give "1.50" as the output. A fix suggested by @minitech:

var numb = 1.5;
numb = +numb.toFixed(2);
// Note the plus sign that drops any "extra" zeroes at the end.
// It changes the result (which is a string) into a number again (think "0 + foo"),
// which means that it uses only as many digits as necessary.

It seems like Math.round is a better solution. But it is not! In some cases it will NOT round correctly:

Math.round(1.005 * 1000)/1000 // Returns 1 instead of expected 1.01!

toFixed() will also NOT round correctly in some cases (tested in Chrome v.55.0.2883.87)!

Examples:

parseFloat("1.555").toFixed(2); // Returns 1.55 instead of 1.56.
parseFloat("1.5550").toFixed(2); // Returns 1.55 instead of 1.56.
// However, it will return correct result if you round 1.5551.
parseFloat("1.5551").toFixed(2); // Returns 1.56 as expected.

1.3555.toFixed(3) // Returns 1.355 instead of expected 1.356.
// However, it will return correct result if you round 1.35551.
1.35551.toFixed(2); // Returns 1.36 as expected.

I guess, this is because 1.555 is actually something like float 1.55499994 behind the scenes.

Solution 1 is to use a script with required rounding algorithm, for example:

function roundNumber(num, scale) {
  if(!("" + num).includes("e")) {
    return +(Math.round(num + "e+" + scale)  + "e-" + scale);
  } else {
    var arr = ("" + num).split("e");
    var sig = ""
    if(+arr[1] + scale > 0) {
      sig = "+";
    }
    return +(Math.round(+arr[0] + "e" + sig + (+arr[1] + scale)) + "e-" + scale);
  }
}

https://plnkr.co/edit/uau8BlS1cqbvWPCHJeOy?p=preview

NOTE: This is not a universal solution for everyone. There are several different rounding algorithms, your implementation can be different, depends on your requirements. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rounding

Solution 2 is to avoid front end calculations and pull rounded values from the backend server.

Edit: Another possible solution, which is not a bullet proof also.

Math.round((num + Number.EPSILON) * 100) / 100

In some cases, when you round number like 1.3549999999999998 it will return incorrect result. Should be 1.35 but result is 1.36.

| improve this answer | |
  • 81
    This one (the toFixed) approach is good, and worked for me, but it specifically does not comply with the original request of "only when necessary". (It rounds 1.5 to 1.50, which breaks the spec.) – Per Lundberg Apr 28 '13 at 20:09
  • 29
    For the "when necessary" requirement, do this: parseFloat(number.toFixed(decimalPlaces)); @PerLundberg – Onur Yıldırım Dec 30 '13 at 2:23
  • 36
    parseFloat("55.555").toFixed(2) returns "55.55" in the Chrome dev console. – Levi Botelho Apr 6 '14 at 16:02
  • 22
    There is no advantage of using toFixed instead of Math.round; toFixed leads to quite the same rounding problems (try them with 5.555 and 1.005), but is like 500x (no kidding) slower than Math.round ... Seems like @MarkG answer is the more accurate here. – Pierre May 20 '14 at 16:49
  • 18
    toFixed doesn't "sometimes" return a string, it always returns a string. – McGuireV10 Jun 25 '14 at 20:39
490

You can use

function roundToTwo(num) {    
    return +(Math.round(num + "e+2")  + "e-2");
}

I found this over on MDN. Their way avoids the problem with 1.005 that was mentioned.

roundToTwo(1.005)
1.01
roundToTwo(10)
10
roundToTwo(1.7777777)
1.78
roundToTwo(9.1)
9.1
roundToTwo(1234.5678)
1234.57
| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    @Redsandro, +(val) is the coercion equivalent of using Number(val). Concatenating "e-2" to an number resulted in a string that needed to be converted back to a number. – Jack Feb 28 '14 at 19:11
  • 41
    Beware that for big and tiny floats that would produce NaN since, eg +"1e-21+2" wont be parsed correctly. – Pierre May 20 '14 at 17:13
  • 16
    You've 'solved' the 1.005 'problem', but introduced a new one: now, in the Chrome console, roundToTwo(1.0049999999999999) comes out as 1.01 (inevitably, since 1.0049999999999999 == 1.005). It seems to me that the float you get if you type num = 1.005 'obviously' 'should' round to 1.00, because the exact value of num is less than 1.005. Of course, it also seems to me that the string '1.005' 'obviously' 'should' be rounded to 1.01. The fact that different people seem to have different intuitions about what the actual correct behaviour is here is part of why it's complicated. – Mark Amery Aug 14 '14 at 21:56
  • 37
    There is no (floating point) number in between 1.0049999999999999 and 1.005, so by definition, they are the same number. This is called a dedekind cut. – Azmisov Feb 18 '15 at 0:48
  • 7
    @Azmisov is right. While 1.00499 < 1.005 is true, 1.0049999999999999 < 1.005 evaluates to false. – falconepl Sep 23 '15 at 10:55
156

MarkG's answer is the correct one. Here's a generic extension for any number of decimal places.

Number.prototype.round = function(places) {
  return +(Math.round(this + "e+" + places)  + "e-" + places);
}

Usage:

var n = 1.7777;    
n.round(2); // 1.78

Unit test:

it.only('should round floats to 2 places', function() {

  var cases = [
    { n: 10,      e: 10,    p:2 },
    { n: 1.7777,  e: 1.78,  p:2 },
    { n: 1.005,   e: 1.01,  p:2 },
    { n: 1.005,   e: 1,     p:0 },
    { n: 1.77777, e: 1.8,   p:1 }
  ]

  cases.forEach(function(testCase) {
    var r = testCase.n.round(testCase.p);
    assert.equal(r, testCase.e, 'didn\'t get right number');
  });
})
| improve this answer | |
  • 21
    Pierre raised a serious issue with MarkG's answer. – dsjoerg Jun 18 '14 at 16:23
  • 9
    Note: If you don't want to alter the Number.prototype -- simply write this as a function: function round(number, decimals) { return +(Math.round(number + "e+" + decimals) + "e-" + decimals); } – Philipp Tsipman Nov 8 '14 at 17:28
  • 2
    A cool way to expand this. You could check if decimal is negative then invert e+ and e-. Then n = 115; n.round(-2); would produce 100 – Lee Louviere Mar 23 '16 at 6:28
  • 4
    Try n: 1e+19 - it returns NaN – DavidJ Dec 18 '17 at 20:59
  • 3
    This algorithm always rounds up (instead of away from zero). So, in case of negative numbers, the output is not what you might expect: (-1.005).round(2) === -1 – Aleksej Komarov Feb 14 '18 at 10:51
136

You should use:

Math.round( num * 100 + Number.EPSILON ) / 100

No one seems to be aware of Number.EPSILON.

Also it's worth noting that this is not a JavaScript weirdness like some people stated.

That is simply the way floating point numbers works in a computer. Like 99% of programming languages, JavaScript doesn't have home made floating point numbers; it relies on the CPU/FPU for that. A computer uses binary, and in binary, there isn't any numbers like 0.1, but a mere binary approximation for that. Why? For the same reason than 1/3 cannot be written in decimal: its value is 0.33333333... with an infinity of threes.

Here come Number.EPSILON. That number is the difference between 1 and the next number existing in the double precision floating point numbers. That's it: There is no number between 1 and 1 + Number.EPSILON.

EDIT:

As asked in the comments, let's clarify one thing: adding Number.EPSILON is relevant only when the value to round is the result of an arithmetic operation, as it can swallow some floating point error delta.

It's not useful when the value comes from a direct source (e.g.: literal, user input or sensor).

EDIT (2019):

Like @maganap and some peoples have pointed out, it's best to add Number.EPSILON before multiplying:

Math.round( ( num + Number.EPSILON ) * 100 ) / 100

EDIT (december 2019):

Lately, I use a function similar to this one for comparing numbers epsilon-aware:

const ESPILON_RATE = 1 + Number.EPSILON ;
const ESPILON_ZERO = Number.MIN_VALUE ;

function epsilonEquals( a , b ) {
  if ( Number.isNaN( a ) || Number.isNaN( b ) ) {
    return false ;
  }
  if ( a === 0 || b === 0 ) {
    return a <= b + EPSILON_ZERO && b <= a + EPSILON_ZERO ;
  }
  return a <= b * EPSILON_RATE && b <= a * EPSILON_RATE ;
}

My use-case is an assertion + data validation lib I'm developing for many years.

In fact, in the code I'm using ESPILON_RATE = 1 + 4 * Number.EPSILON and EPSILON_ZERO = 4 * Number.MIN_VALUE (four times the epsilon), because I want an equality checker loose enough for cumulating floating point error.

So far, it looks perfect for me. I hope it will help.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @palota you could define a really tine number like the EPSILON cronvel is mentioning – Daniel San May 24 '17 at 15:25
  • 4
    This is the right answer! The problem itself is related with how float numbers work internally, not about javascript – Daniel San May 24 '17 at 15:26
  • 24
    Actually, you have to add epsilon BEFORE multiplying by 100. Math.round( (num + Number.EPSILON) * 100) / 100. I agree also this is the right method for rounding correctly (although it's not exactly what was asked in this question). – maganap Nov 5 '17 at 15:30
  • 2
    @cronvel Hmm. You're right; the choice of direction does make sense. So I guess my remaining objection is just that doing this only makes sense if you're working in a domain where you've got a principled reason to think that your value is a "round number". If you know that your input is the result of simple arithmetic operations on numbers with small numbers of decimal places, then sure, you probably only have 0.004999999999999999 as the result of compounded floating point error and the mathematically correct result was probably 0.005. If it's a reading from a sensor? Not so much. – Mark Amery Dec 8 '17 at 12:17
  • 1
    @marchaos It doesn't fail: halves are always rounded up. E.g. Math.round(1.5)=2, but Math.round(-1.5)=-1. So this is perfectly consistent. Here -1 is greater than -2, just like -1000 is greater than -1000.01. Not to be confused with greater absolute numbers. – cronvel Mar 27 at 9:35
87
+50

This question is complicated.

Suppose we have a function, roundTo2DP(num), that takes a float as an argument and returns a value rounded to 2 decimal places. What should each of these expressions evaluate to?

  • roundTo2DP(0.014999999999999999)
  • roundTo2DP(0.0150000000000000001)
  • roundTo2DP(0.015)

The 'obvious' answer is that the first example should round to 0.01 (because it's closer to 0.01 than to 0.02) while the other two should round to 0.02 (because 0.0150000000000000001 is closer to 0.02 than to 0.01, and because 0.015 is exactly halfway between them and there is a mathematical convention that such numbers get rounded up).

The catch, which you may have guessed, is that roundTo2DP cannot possibly be implemented to give those obvious answers, because all three numbers passed to it are the same number. IEEE 754 binary floating point numbers (the kind used by JavaScript) can't exactly represent most non-integer numbers, and so all three numeric literals above get rounded to a nearby valid floating point number. This number, as it happens, is exactly

0.01499999999999999944488848768742172978818416595458984375

which is closer to 0.01 than to 0.02.

You can see that all three numbers are the same at your browser console, Node shell, or other JavaScript interpreter. Just compare them:

> 0.014999999999999999 === 0.0150000000000000001
true

So when I write m = 0.0150000000000000001, the exact value of m that I end up with is closer to 0.01 than it is to 0.02. And yet, if I convert m to a String...

> var m = 0.0150000000000000001;
> console.log(String(m));
0.015
> var m = 0.014999999999999999;
> console.log(String(m));
0.015

... I get 0.015, which should round to 0.02, and which is noticeably not the 56-decimal-place number I earlier said that all of these numbers were exactly equal to. So what dark magic is this?

The answer can be found in the ECMAScript specification, in section 7.1.12.1: ToString applied to the Number type. Here the rules for converting some Number m to a String are laid down. The key part is point 5, in which an integer s is generated whose digits will be used in the String representation of m:

let n, k, and s be integers such that k ≥ 1, 10k-1s < 10k, the Number value for s × 10n-k is m, and k is as small as possible. Note that k is the number of digits in the decimal representation of s, that s is not divisible by 10, and that the least significant digit of s is not necessarily uniquely determined by these criteria.

The key part here is the requirement that "k is as small as possible". What that requirement amounts to is a requirement that, given a Number m, the value of String(m) must have the least possible number of digits while still satisfying the requirement that Number(String(m)) === m. Since we already know that 0.015 === 0.0150000000000000001, it's now clear why String(0.0150000000000000001) === '0.015' must be true.

Of course, none of this discussion has directly answered what roundTo2DP(m) should return. If m's exact value is 0.01499999999999999944488848768742172978818416595458984375, but its String representation is '0.015', then what is the correct answer - mathematically, practically, philosophically, or whatever - when we round it to two decimal places?

There is no single correct answer to this. It depends upon your use case. You probably want to respect the String representation and round upwards when:

  • The value being represented is inherently discrete, e.g. an amount of currency in a 3-decimal-place currency like dinars. In this case, the true value of a Number like 0.015 is 0.015, and the 0.0149999999... representation that it gets in binary floating point is a rounding error. (Of course, many will argue, reasonably, that you should use a decimal library for handling such values and never represent them as binary floating point Numbers in the first place.)
  • The value was typed by a user. In this case, again, the exact decimal number entered is more 'true' than the nearest binary floating point representation.

On the other hand, you probably want to respect the binary floating point value and round downwards when your value is from an inherently continuous scale - for instance, if it's a reading from a sensor.

These two approaches require different code. To respect the String representation of the Number, we can (with quite a bit of reasonably subtle code) implement our own rounding that acts directly on the String representation, digit by digit, using the same algorithm you would've used in school when you were taught how to round numbers. Below is an example which respects the OP's requirement of representing the number to 2 decimal places "only when necessary" by stripping trailing zeroes after the decimal point; you may, of course, need to tweak it to your precise needs.

/**
 * Converts num to a decimal string (if it isn't one already) and then rounds it
 * to at most dp decimal places.
 *
 * For explanation of why you'd want to perform rounding operations on a String
 * rather than a Number, see http://stackoverflow.com/a/38676273/1709587
 *
 * @param {(number|string)} num
 * @param {number} dp
 * @return {string}
 */
function roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes (num, dp) {
    if (arguments.length != 2) throw new Error("2 arguments required");

    num = String(num);
    if (num.indexOf('e+') != -1) {
        // Can't round numbers this large because their string representation
        // contains an exponent, like 9.99e+37
        throw new Error("num too large");
    }
    if (num.indexOf('.') == -1) {
        // Nothing to do
        return num;
    }

    var parts = num.split('.'),
        beforePoint = parts[0],
        afterPoint = parts[1],
        shouldRoundUp = afterPoint[dp] >= 5,
        finalNumber;

    afterPoint = afterPoint.slice(0, dp);
    if (!shouldRoundUp) {
        finalNumber = beforePoint + '.' + afterPoint;
    } else if (/^9+$/.test(afterPoint)) {
        // If we need to round up a number like 1.9999, increment the integer
        // before the decimal point and discard the fractional part.
        finalNumber = Number(beforePoint)+1;
    } else {
        // Starting from the last digit, increment digits until we find one
        // that is not 9, then stop
        var i = dp-1;
        while (true) {
            if (afterPoint[i] == '9') {
                afterPoint = afterPoint.substr(0, i) +
                             '0' +
                             afterPoint.substr(i+1);
                i--;
            } else {
                afterPoint = afterPoint.substr(0, i) +
                             (Number(afterPoint[i]) + 1) +
                             afterPoint.substr(i+1);
                break;
            }
        }

        finalNumber = beforePoint + '.' + afterPoint;
    }

    // Remove trailing zeroes from fractional part before returning
    return finalNumber.replace(/0+$/, '')
}

Example usage:

> roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes(1.6, 2)
'1.6'
> roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes(10000, 2)
'10000'
> roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes(0.015, 2)
'0.02'
> roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes('0.015000', 2)
'0.02'
> roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes(1, 1)
'1'
> roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes('0.015', 2)
'0.02'
> roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes(0.01499999999999999944488848768742172978818416595458984375, 2)
'0.02'
> roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes('0.01499999999999999944488848768742172978818416595458984375', 2)
'0.01'

The function above is probably what you want to use to avoid users ever witnessing numbers that they have entered being rounded wrongly.

(As an alternative, you could also try the round10 library which provides a similarly-behaving function with a wildly different implementation.)

But what if you have the second kind of Number - a value taken from a continuous scale, where there's no reason to think that approximate decimal representations with fewer decimal places are more accurate than those with more? In that case, we don't want to respect the String representation, because that representation (as explained in the spec) is already sort-of-rounded; we don't want to make the mistake of saying "0.014999999...375 rounds up to 0.015, which rounds up to 0.02, so 0.014999999...375 rounds up to 0.02".

Here we can simply use the built-in toFixed method. Note that by calling Number() on the String returned by toFixed, we get a Number whose String representation has no trailing zeroes (thanks to the way JavaScript computes the String representation of a Number, discussed earlier in this answer).

/**
 * Takes a float and rounds it to at most dp decimal places. For example
 *
 *     roundFloatNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes(1.2345, 3)
 *
 * returns 1.234
 *
 * Note that since this treats the value passed to it as a floating point
 * number, it will have counterintuitive results in some cases. For instance,
 * 
 *     roundFloatNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes(0.015, 2)
 *
 * gives 0.01 where 0.02 might be expected. For an explanation of why, see
 * http://stackoverflow.com/a/38676273/1709587. You may want to consider using the
 * roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes function there instead.
 *
 * @param {number} num
 * @param {number} dp
 * @return {number}
 */
function roundFloatNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes (num, dp) {
    var numToFixedDp = Number(num).toFixed(dp);
    return Number(numToFixedDp);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This doesn't work in some edge cases: try (jsfiddle) with roundStringNumberWithoutTrailingZeroes(362.42499999999995, 2). Expected result (as in PHP echo round(362.42499999999995, 2)): 362.43. Actual result: 362.42 – Dr. Gianluigi Zane Zanettini Dec 6 '17 at 14:11
  • 1
    @Dr.GianluigiZaneZanettini Huh. Weird. I'm not sure why PHP's round gives 362.43. That seems intuitively wrong, since 362.42499999999995 is less than 362.425 (in math and in code - 362.42499999999995 < 362.425 is true in both JS and PHP). Nor does PHP's answer minimise the distance between the original and rounded floating point numbers, since 362.43 - 362.42499999999995 > 362.42499999999995 - 362.42. According to php.net/manual/en/function.round.php, PHP's round follows the C99 standard; I'll have to venture into the land of C to understand what's going on. – Mark Amery Dec 6 '17 at 14:39
  • 1
    After having looked at the implementation of rounding in PHP's source, I have no damn clue what it's doing. It's a horribly complicated implementation full of macros and branches and string conversions and branching on hard-coded magic precision values. I'm not sure what to say beyond "PHP's answer is blatantly wrong, and we should file a bug report". How'd you find the number 362.42499999999995, by the way? – Mark Amery Dec 6 '17 at 22:29
  • 1
    @Dr.GianluigiZaneZanettini I've created a bug report: bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=75644 – Mark Amery Dec 6 '17 at 22:48
  • 3
    @Dr.GianluigiZaneZanettini "Do I make any sense?" - no; that's not how rounding works. 1.000005 ends in five, but if rounded to the nearest integer the answer should be 1, not 2. Likewise, 1499995 ends in five, but if rounded to the nearest million, the result should be 1000000, not 2000000. In the case of 362.42499999999995 being rounded to 2 DP, what should determine the rounding direction is the third decimal place, which is 4. – Mark Amery Dec 7 '17 at 16:27
84

One can use .toFixed(NumberOfDecimalPlaces).

var str = 10.234.toFixed(2); // => '10.23'
var number = Number(str); // => 10.23
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Also because it adds trailing zeros, which is not what the original question asked for. – Alastair Maw Dec 5 '14 at 18:38
  • 3
    But trailing zeros are easily stripped with a regex, i.e. ` Number(10.10000.toFixed(2).replace(/0+$/, ''))` => 10.1 – Chad Feb 18 '16 at 21:31
  • 1
    @daniel the top answer is the same (as of now) but it doesn't alsways round correctly, try +(1.005).toFixed(2) which returns 1 instead of 1.01. – Emile Bergeron Nov 1 '16 at 19:34
  • 3
    @ChadMcElligott: Your regex does not work well with integers: Number(9).toFixed(2).replace(/0+$/, '') => "9." – Jacob van Lingen May 18 '17 at 9:41
  • It seems this doesn't round. It's just truncates basically. In some cases, well enough! Thanks. – iedmrc Sep 21 '18 at 11:45
82

Consider .toFixed() and .toPrecision():

http://www.javascriptkit.com/javatutors/formatnumber.shtml

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    toFixed adds the decimal points to every value no matter what. – stinkycheeseman Aug 6 '12 at 17:22
  • 17
    Both are useless here – Esailija Aug 6 '12 at 17:23
  • Unfortunately, both functions will add extra decimal places which @stinkycheeseman appears to not want. – jackwanders Aug 6 '12 at 17:24
  • 2
  • 5
    they return strings and not numbers, so they are formatting and not calculating.. – saimiris_devel Jul 14 '16 at 9:59
63

A precise rounding method. Source: Mozilla

(function(){

    /**
     * Decimal adjustment of a number.
     *
     * @param   {String}    type    The type of adjustment.
     * @param   {Number}    value   The number.
     * @param   {Integer}   exp     The exponent (the 10 logarithm of the adjustment base).
     * @returns {Number}            The adjusted value.
     */
    function decimalAdjust(type, value, exp) {
        // If the exp is undefined or zero...
        if (typeof exp === 'undefined' || +exp === 0) {
            return Math[type](value);
        }
        value = +value;
        exp = +exp;
        // If the value is not a number or the exp is not an integer...
        if (isNaN(value) || !(typeof exp === 'number' && exp % 1 === 0)) {
            return NaN;
        }
        // Shift
        value = value.toString().split('e');
        value = Math[type](+(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] - exp) : -exp)));
        // Shift back
        value = value.toString().split('e');
        return +(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] + exp) : exp));
    }

    // Decimal round
    if (!Math.round10) {
        Math.round10 = function(value, exp) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', value, exp);
        };
    }
    // Decimal floor
    if (!Math.floor10) {
        Math.floor10 = function(value, exp) {
            return decimalAdjust('floor', value, exp);
        };
    }
    // Decimal ceil
    if (!Math.ceil10) {
        Math.ceil10 = function(value, exp) {
            return decimalAdjust('ceil', value, exp);
        };
    }
})();

Examples:

// Round
Math.round10(55.55, -1); // 55.6
Math.round10(55.549, -1); // 55.5
Math.round10(55, 1); // 60
Math.round10(54.9, 1); // 50
Math.round10(-55.55, -1); // -55.5
Math.round10(-55.551, -1); // -55.6
Math.round10(-55, 1); // -50
Math.round10(-55.1, 1); // -60
Math.round10(1.005, -2); // 1.01 -- compare this with Math.round(1.005*100)/100 above
// Floor
Math.floor10(55.59, -1); // 55.5
Math.floor10(59, 1); // 50
Math.floor10(-55.51, -1); // -55.6
Math.floor10(-51, 1); // -60
// Ceil
Math.ceil10(55.51, -1); // 55.6
Math.ceil10(51, 1); // 60
Math.ceil10(-55.59, -1); // -55.5
Math.ceil10(-59, 1); // -50
| improve this answer | |
  • Somebody put this on GitHub and npm as well: github.com/jhohlfeld/round10 – Jo Liss Jun 3 '16 at 21:51
  • Nah, Math.round10(3544.5249, -2) returns 3544.52 instead 3544.53 – Matija Sep 21 '16 at 16:29
  • 2
    @Matija Wolfram alpha says 3544.52 too. You want to minimize the error between the current number and the rounded approximation. The closest approximation of 3544.5249 to 2 decimal places is 3544.52 (error = 0.0049). If it was 3544.53, the error would be 0.0051. You are doing successive rounding i.e. Math.round10( Math.round10 (3544.5249, -3), -2) which gives a larger rounding error and hence not desirable. – user Sep 21 '16 at 17:33
  • 3
    @Matija, from mathematical point of view, 3544.5249 rounded is 3544.52, not 3544.53, so this code is correct. If you want it to rounded it to 3544.53 in this and cases like this (even tough is incorrect), do something like this: number += 0.00011 – Bozidar Sikanjic Nov 16 '16 at 15:03
  • @Matija: I think the function works as it should. Maybe you want to iterate the rounding like: Math.round10( Math.round10(3544.5249, -3) , -2) – jumxozizi Jul 22 '17 at 14:31
60

None of the answers found here is correct. @stinkycheeseman asked to round up, you all rounded the number.

To round up, use this:

Math.ceil(num * 100)/100;
| improve this answer | |
  • 15
    The example input and output show that although the question said 'round up...' it was actually intended to be 'round to...'. – JayDM Jul 5 '13 at 4:18
  • 2
    @stinkycheeseman was pointing out an error in a specific case, he didn't want to always round up as ceil does, he just wanted 0.005 to round up to 0.01 – mjaggard Aug 23 '13 at 10:17
  • 9
    Found weird bug while testing Math.ceil(1.1 * 100)/100; -it returns 1.11, because 1.1*100 is 110.00000000000001 according to brand new modern browsers Firefox, Chrome, Safari and Opera... IE, in old fashion, still thinks 1.1*100=1100. – skobaljic Oct 21 '13 at 11:57
  • 1
    @skobaljic try Math.ceil(num.toFixed(4) * 100) / 100 – treeface Dec 11 '13 at 23:07
  • 1
    @treeface Math.ceil((1.1).toFixed(4) * 100) / 100 will also return 1.11 in Firefox, the modern browsers problem/bug is with multiplication and people should know about it (I worked on a lottery game that time for example). – skobaljic Jan 9 '14 at 9:43
52

Here is a simple way to do it:

Math.round(value * 100) / 100

You might want to go ahead and make a separate function to do it for you though:

function roundToTwo(value) {
    return(Math.round(value * 100) / 100);
}

Then you would simply pass in the value.

You could enhance it to round to any arbitrary number of decimals by adding a second parameter.

function myRound(value, places) {
    var multiplier = Math.pow(10, places);

    return (Math.round(value * multiplier) / multiplier);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This solution is wrong, see stackoverflow.com/questions/38322372/… if you input 156893.145 and round it with above function you get 156893.14 instead of 156893.15 !!! – saimiris_devel Jul 14 '16 at 9:48
  • 2
    @saimiris_devel, you have managed to find an instance where the numerical representation of numbers in JavaScript fails. You are correct that it rounds incorrectly. But - that is because your sample number when multiplied by 100 is already broken (15689314.499999998). Really, a fully featured answer would require a library that has been specifically developed to take into account the inconsistencies in JavaScript's handling of real numbers. Otherwise, you could probably invalidate any of the answers that have been given to this question. – JayDM Nov 10 '18 at 23:39
36
+(10).toFixed(2); // = 10
+(10.12345).toFixed(2); // = 10.12

(10).toFixed(2); // = 10.00
(10.12345).toFixed(2); // = 10.12
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This won't always give the same results you would get if you took the String representation of your Number and rounded it. For example, +(0.015).toFixed(2) == 0.01. – Mark Amery Jul 30 '16 at 17:17
35

For me Math.round() was not giving correct answer. I found toFixed(2) works better. Below are examples of both:

console.log(Math.round(43000 / 80000) * 100); // wrong answer

console.log(((43000 / 80000) * 100).toFixed(2)); // correct answer

| improve this answer | |
  • Important to note that toFixed does not perform a rounding, and that Math.round just rounds to the nearest whole number. To preserve the decimals we therefore need to multiply the original number by the number of powers of ten whose zeros representing your desired number of decimals, and then divide the result by the same number. In your case: Math.round(43000 / 80000 * 100 * 100) / 100. At last toFixed(2) may be applied in order to ensure that there is always two decimals in the result (with trailing zeros where needed) – perfect for right-aligning a series of numbers presented vertically :) – Turbo May 1 '18 at 14:26
  • 7
    Also important to note that .toFIxed() outputs a string, not a number. – carpiediem Jun 26 '18 at 16:19
  • 2
    This still doesn't solve the rounding for 1.005. (1.005).toFixed(2) still results to 1.00. – DPac Oct 26 '18 at 15:46
34

Use this function Number(x).toFixed(2);

| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    Wrap it all in Number again, if you don't want it returned as a string: Number(Number(x).toFixed(2)); – user993683 Sep 12 '15 at 5:17
  • 5
    The Number call is not necessary, x.toFixed(2) works. – bgusach Dec 14 '18 at 16:09
  • 3
    @bgusach Number call needed, since the statement x.toFixed(2) return string and not a number. To convert again to number we need to wrap with Number – Mohan Ram Mar 15 '19 at 6:26
  • 2
    When using this method (1).toFixed(2) returns 1.00, but questioner needed 1 in this case. – Eugene Mala Jun 7 '19 at 20:40
  • 1
    This doesn't work, 1.005.toFixed(2) yields "1" when it should be "1.01". – Adam Jagosz Aug 28 '19 at 14:00
33

Try this light weight solution:

function round(x, digits){
  return parseFloat(x.toFixed(digits))
}

 round(1.222,  2) ;
 // 1.22
 round(1.222, 10) ;
 // 1.222
| improve this answer | |
  • Anyone know if there's any difference between this and return Number(x.toFixed(digits))? – user993683 Sep 12 '15 at 5:16
  • 1
    @JoeRocc ... should make no difference as far a I can see since .toFixed() allows only for numbers anyways . – petermeissner Sep 12 '15 at 10:16
  • 4
    This answer has the same problem as mentioned several times on this page. Try round(1.005, 2) and see a result of 1 instead of 1.01. – MilConDoin Aug 5 '16 at 6:54
  • seems more a problem of the rounding algo? - there are more than one would imagine: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rounding ... round(0.995, 2) => 0.99; round(1.006, 2) => 1.01 ; round(1.005, 2) => 1 – petermeissner Feb 7 '18 at 5:35
33

2017
Just use native code .toFixed()

number = 1.2345;
number.toFixed(2) // "1.23"

If you need to be strict and add digits just if needed it can use replace

number = 1; // "1"
number.toFixed(5).replace(/\.?0*$/g,'');
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    The toFixed method returns a string. If you want a number result you'll need to send the result of toFixed to parseFloat. – Zambonilli Nov 7 '17 at 20:04
  • @Zambonilli Or just multiply by 1 if it necessary. but because fixed number most cases are for display and not for calculation string is the right format – pery mimon Nov 8 '17 at 13:05
  • 2
    -1; not only was toFixed suggested by multiple answers years before yours, but it fails to satisfy the "only if necessary" condition in the question; (1).toFixed(2) gives "1.00" where the asker desired "1". – Mark Amery Dec 7 '17 at 0:02
  • Ok got it. I add some solution also for that case – pery mimon Dec 14 '17 at 17:05
  • If you're using lodash, it's even easier: _.round(number, decimalPlace) Deleted my last comment, cuz it has an issue. Lodash _.round DOES work, though. 1.005 with decimal place of 2 converts to 1.01. – Devin Fields Jul 31 '18 at 17:40
31

There are a couple of ways to do that. For people like me, the Lodash's variant

function round(number, precision) {
    var pair = (number + 'e').split('e')
    var value = Math.round(pair[0] + 'e' + (+pair[1] + precision))
    pair = (value + 'e').split('e')
    return +(pair[0] + 'e' + (+pair[1] - precision))
}

Usage:

round(0.015, 2) // 0.02
round(1.005, 2) // 1.01

If your project uses jQuery or lodash, you can also find proper round method in the libraries.

Update 1

I removed the variant n.toFixed(2), because it is not correct. Thank you @avalanche1

| improve this answer | |
  • The second option will return a string with exactly two decimal points. The question asks for decimal points only if necessary. The first option is better in this case. – Marcos Lima Jul 5 '16 at 13:36
  • @MarcosLima Number.toFixed() will return a string but with a plus symbol before it, JS interpreter will convert the string to a number. This is a syntax sugar. – stanleyxu2005 Jul 5 '16 at 14:04
  • On Firefox, alert((+1234).toFixed(2)) shows "1234.00". – Marcos Lima Jul 5 '16 at 14:11
  • On Firefox, alert(+1234.toFixed(2)) throws SyntaxError: identifier starts immediately after numeric literal. I stick with the 1st option. – Marcos Lima Jul 5 '16 at 15:19
  • This doesn't work in some edge cases: try (jsfiddle) with 362.42499999999995. Expected result (as in PHP echo round(362.42499999999995, 2)): 362.43. Actual result: 362.42 – Dr. Gianluigi Zane Zanettini Dec 6 '17 at 13:42
26

If you are using lodash library, you can use the round method of lodash like following.

_.round(number, precision)

Eg:

_.round(1.7777777, 2) = 1.78
| improve this answer | |
  • @Peter The set of functionalities that Lodash provide is really good compared to standard Javascript. However, I heard that Lodash has some performance issue with compare to standard JS. codeburst.io/… – Madura Pradeep Oct 4 '18 at 8:26
  • 1
    I accept your point that there are performance drawbacks with using lodash. I think that those issues are common to many abstractions. But just look at how many answers there are on this thread and how the intuitive solutions fail for edge cases. We have seen this pattern with jQuery and the root problem was solved when browsers adopted a common standard that solved most of our use cases. Performance bottlenecks were then moved to the browser engines. I think the same should happen to lodash. :) – Peter Oct 4 '18 at 10:17
26

Since ES6 there is a 'proper' way (without overriding statics and creating workarounds) to do this by using toPrecision

var x = 1.49999999999;
console.log(x.toPrecision(4));
console.log(x.toPrecision(3));
console.log(x.toPrecision(2));

var y = Math.PI;
console.log(y.toPrecision(6));
console.log(y.toPrecision(5));
console.log(y.toPrecision(4));

var z = 222.987654
console.log(z.toPrecision(6));
console.log(z.toPrecision(5));
console.log(z.toPrecision(4));

then you can just parseFloat and zeroes will 'go away'.

console.log(parseFloat((1.4999).toPrecision(3)));
console.log(parseFloat((1.005).toPrecision(3)));
console.log(parseFloat((1.0051).toPrecision(3)));

It doesn't solve the '1.005 rounding problem' though - since it is intrinsic to how float fractions are being processed.

console.log(1.005 - 0.005);

If you are open to libraries you can use bignumber.js

console.log(1.005 - 0.005);
console.log(new BigNumber(1.005).minus(0.005));

console.log(new BigNumber(1.005).round(4));
console.log(new BigNumber(1.005).round(3));
console.log(new BigNumber(1.005).round(2));
console.log(new BigNumber(1.005).round(1));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/bignumber.js/2.3.0/bignumber.min.js"></script>

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    (1.005).toPrecision(3) still returns 1.00 instead of 1.01 actually. – Giacomo Feb 23 '18 at 22:21
  • toPrecision returns a string which changes the desired output type. – adamduren Nov 16 '18 at 22:59
  • @Giacomo It is not a flaw of .toPrecision method, it is a specificity of floating-point numbers (which numbers in JS are) — try 1.005 - 0.005, it will return 0.9999999999999999. – shau-kote Nov 26 '18 at 1:44
  • 1
    (1).toPrecision(3) returns '1.00', but questioner wanted to have 1 in this case. – Eugene Mala Jun 7 '19 at 20:39
  • 1
    As @Giacomo said, this answer seems to confuse "significant digits" with "rounding to a number of decimal places". toPrecision does the format, not the latter, and is not an answer to the OP's question, although it may seem at first relevant it gets a lot wrong. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Significant_figures. For example Number(123.4).toPrecision(2) returns "1.2e+2" and Number(12.345).toPrecision(2) returns "12". I'd also agree with @adamduren's point that it returns a string which is not desirable (not a huge problem but not desirable). – Neek Jul 9 '19 at 4:02
25

This may help you:

var result = Math.round(input*100)/100;

for more information, you can have a look at this link

Math.round(num) vs num.toFixed(0) and browser inconsistencies

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Why in the world does the accepted answer have so many more votes than this one since they're practically the same thing, but this one was posted 1 minute after the accepted one? – Quote Dave Jan 25 at 1:10
24

In general, decimal rounding is done by scaling: round(num * p) / p

Naive implementation

Using the following function with halfway numbers, you will get either the upper rounded value as expected, or the lower rounded value sometimes depending on the input.

This inconsistency in rounding may introduce hard to detect bugs in the client code.

function naiveRound(num, decimalPlaces = 0) {
    var p = Math.pow(10, decimalPlaces);
    return Math.round(num * p) / p;
}

console.log( naiveRound(1.245, 2) );  // 1.25 correct (rounded as expected)
console.log( naiveRound(1.255, 2) );  // 1.25 incorrect (should be 1.26)

// testing edge cases
console.log( naiveRound(1.005, 2) );  // 1    incorrect (should be 1.01)
console.log( naiveRound(2.175, 2) );  // 2.17 incorrect (should be 2.18)
console.log( naiveRound(5.015, 2) );  // 5.01 incorrect (should be 5.02)

Better implementations

Exponential notation

By converting the number to a string in the exponential notation, positive numbers are rounded as expected. But, be aware that negative numbers round differently than positive numbers.

In fact, it performs what is basically equivalent to "round half up" as the rule, you will see that round(-1.005, 2) evaluates to -1 even though round(1.005, 2) evaluates to 1.01. The lodash _.round method uses this technique.

/**
 * Round half up ('round half towards positive infinity')
 * Uses exponential notation to avoid floating-point issues.
 * Negative numbers round differently than positive numbers.
 */
function round(num, decimalPlaces = 0) {
    num = Math.round(num + "e" + decimalPlaces);
    return Number(num + "e" + -decimalPlaces);
}

// test rounding of half
console.log( round(0.5, 0) );  // 1
console.log( round(-0.5, 0) ); // 0

// testing edge cases
console.log( round(1.005, 2) );   // 1.01
console.log( round(2.175, 2) );   // 2.18
console.log( round(5.015, 2) );   // 5.02

console.log( round(-1.005, 2) );  // -1
console.log( round(-2.175, 2) );  // -2.17
console.log( round(-5.015, 2) );  // -5.01

If you want the usual behavior when rounding negative numbers, you would need to convert negative numbers to positive before calling Math.round(), and then convert them back to negative numbers before returning.

// Round half away from zero
function round(num, decimalPlaces = 0) {
    num = Math.round(Math.abs(num) + "e" + decimalPlaces) * Math.sign(num);
    return Number(num + "e" + -decimalPlaces);
}

Number.EPSILON

There is a different purely mathematical technique to perform round-to-nearest (using "round half away from zero"), in which epsilon correction is applied before calling the rounding function.

Simply, we add the smallest possible float value (= 1.0 ulp; unit in the last place) to the product before rounding. This moves to the next representable float value, away from zero.

/**
 * Round half away from zero ('commercial' rounding)
 * Uses correction to offset floating-point inaccuracies.
 * Works symmetrically for positive and negative numbers.
 */
function round(num, decimalPlaces = 0) {
    var p = Math.pow(10, decimalPlaces);
    var m = (num * p) * (1 + Number.EPSILON);
    return Math.round(m) / p;
}

// test rounding of half
console.log( round(0.5, 0) );  // 1
console.log( round(-0.5, 0) ); // -1

// testing edge cases
console.log( round(1.005, 2) );  // 1.01
console.log( round(2.175, 2) );  // 2.18
console.log( round(5.015, 2) );  // 5.02

console.log( round(-1.005, 2) ); // -1.01
console.log( round(-2.175, 2) ); // -2.18
console.log( round(-5.015, 2) ); // -5.02

This is needed to offset the implicit round-off error that may occur during encoding of decimal numbers, particularly those having "5" in the last decimal position, like 1.005, 2.675 and 16.235. Actually, 1.005 in decimal system is encoded to 1.0049999999999999 in 64-bit binary float; while, 1234567.005 in decimal system is encoded to 1234567.0049999998882413 in 64-bit binary float.

It is worth noting that the maximum binary round-off error is dependent upon (1) the magnitude of the number and (2) the relative machine epsilon (2^-52).

Double rounding

Here, we use the toPrecision() method to strip the floating-point round-off errors in the intermediate calculations. Simply, we round to 15 significant figures to strip the round-off error at the 16th significant digit. This technique to preround the result to significant digits is also used by PHP 7 round function.

// Round half away from zero
function round(num, decimalPlaces = 0) {
    var p = Math.pow(10, decimalPlaces);
    var m = Number((Math.abs(num) * p).toPrecision(15));
    return Math.round(m) / p * Math.sign(num);
}

// test rounding of half
console.log( round(0.5, 0) );  // 1
console.log( round(-0.5, 0) ); // -1

// testing edge cases
console.log( round(1.005, 2) );  // 1.01
console.log( round(2.175, 2) );  // 2.18
console.log( round(5.015, 2) );  // 5.02

console.log( round(-1.005, 2) ); // -1.01
console.log( round(-2.175, 2) ); // -2.18
console.log( round(-5.015, 2) ); // -5.02

Arbitrary-precision JavaScript library - decimal.js

// Round half away from zero
function round(num, decimalPlaces = 0) {
    return new Decimal(num).toDecimalPlaces(decimalPlaces).toNumber();
}

// test rounding of half
console.log( round(0.5, 0) );  // 1
console.log( round(-0.5, 0) ); // -1

// testing edge cases
console.log( round(1.005, 2) );  // 1.01
console.log( round(2.175, 2) );  // 2.18
console.log( round(5.015, 2) );  // 5.02

console.log( round(-1.005, 2) ); // -1.01
console.log( round(-2.175, 2) ); // -2.18
console.log( round(-5.015, 2) ); // -5.02
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/decimal.js/10.2.1/decimal.js" integrity="sha512-GKse2KVGCCMVBn4riigHjXE8j5hCxYLPXDw8AvcjUtrt+a9TbZFtIKGdArXwYOlZvdmkhQLWQ46ZE3Q1RIa7uQ==" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>

Solution 1: string in exponential notation

Inspired by the solution provided by KFish here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/55521592/4208440

A simple drop in solution that provides accurate decimal rounding, flooring, and ceiling to a specific number of decimal places without adding a whole library. It treats floats more like decimals by fixing the binary rounding issues to avoid unexpected results: for example, floor((0.1+0.7)*10) will return the expected result 8.

Numbers are rounded to a specific number of fractional digits. Specifying a negative precision will round to any number of places to the left of the decimal point.

// Solution 1
var DecimalPrecision = (function() {
    if (Math.sign === undefined) {
        Math.sign = function(x) {
            return ((x > 0) - (x < 0)) || +x;
        };
    }
    if (Math.trunc === undefined) {
        Math.trunc = function(v) {
            return v < 0 ? Math.ceil(v) : Math.floor(v);
        };
    }
    var decimalAdjust = function(type, num, decimalPlaces) {
        var shift = function(value, exponent) {
            value = (value + 'e').split('e');
            return +(value[0] + 'e' + (+value[1] + (exponent || 0)));
        };
        var n = type === 'round' ? Math.abs(num) : num;
        var m = shift(n, +decimalPlaces);
        var r = shift(Math[type](m), -decimalPlaces);
        return type === 'round' ? Math.sign(num) * r : r;
    };
    return {
        // Decimal round (half away from zero)
        round: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal ceil
        ceil: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('ceil', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal floor
        floor: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('floor', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal trunc
        trunc: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('trunc', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Format using fixed-point notation
        toFixed: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', num, decimalPlaces).toFixed(decimalPlaces);
        }
    };
})();

// test rounding of half
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(0.5));  // 1
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(-0.5)); // -1

// testing very small numbers
console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(1e-8, 2) === 0.01);         // 0.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision.floor(1e-8, 2) === 0);              // 0

// testing simple cases
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);       // -5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(5.12, 1) === 5.2);           // 5.2
console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);        // -5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision.floor(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision.floor(-5.12, 1) === -5.2);       // -5.2
console.log(DecimalPrecision.trunc(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision.trunc(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);       // -5.1

// testing edge cases for round
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(1.005, 2) === 1.01);       // 1.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(39.425, 2) === 39.43);    // 39.43
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(-1.005, 2) === -1.01);    // -1.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(-39.425, 2) === -39.43); // -39.43

// testing edge cases for ceil
console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(9.130, 2) === 9.13);        // 9.13
console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(65.180, 2) === 65.18);     // 65.18
console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(-2.260, 2) === -2.26);     // -2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(-18.150, 2) === -18.15);  // -18.15

// testing edge cases for floor
console.log(DecimalPrecision.floor(2.260, 2) === 2.26);       // 2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision.floor(18.150, 2) === 18.15);    // 18.15
console.log(DecimalPrecision.floor(-9.130, 2) === -9.13);    // -9.13
console.log(DecimalPrecision.floor(-65.180, 2) === -65.18); // -65.18

// testing edge cases for trunc
console.log(DecimalPrecision.trunc(2.260, 2) === 2.26);       // 2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision.trunc(18.150, 2) === 18.15);    // 18.15
console.log(DecimalPrecision.trunc(-2.260, 2) === -2.26);    // -2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision.trunc(-18.150, 2) === -18.15); // -18.15

// testing round to tens and hundreds
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(1262.48, -1) === 1260);    // 1260
console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(1262.48, -2) === 1300);    // 1300

// testing toFixed()
console.log(DecimalPrecision.toFixed(1.005, 2) === "1.01");   // "1.01"

Solution 2: purely mathematical (Number.EPSILON)

This solution avoids any string conversion / manipulation of any kind for performance reasons.

Solution 1: 25,838 ops/sec

Solution 2: 655,087 ops/sec

http://jsbench.github.io/#31ec3a8b3d22bd840f8e6822e681a3ac

// Solution 2
var DecimalPrecision2 = (function() {
    if (Number.EPSILON === undefined) {
        Number.EPSILON = Math.pow(2, -52);
    }
    if (Math.trunc === undefined) {
        Math.trunc = function(v) {
            return v < 0 ? Math.ceil(v) : Math.floor(v);
        };
    }
    var isRound = function(num, decimalPlaces) {
        //return decimalPlaces >= 0 &&
        //    +num.toFixed(decimalPlaces) === num;
        var p = Math.pow(10, decimalPlaces);
        return Math.round(num * p) / p === num;
    };
    var decimalAdjust = function(type, num, decimalPlaces) {
        if (isRound(num, decimalPlaces || 0))
            return num;
        var p = Math.pow(10, decimalPlaces || 0);
        var m = (num * p) * (1 + Number.EPSILON);
        return Math[type](m) / p;
    };
    return {
        // Decimal round (half away from zero)
        round: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal ceil
        ceil: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('ceil', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal floor
        floor: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('floor', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal trunc
        trunc: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('trunc', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Format using fixed-point notation
        toFixed: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', num, decimalPlaces).toFixed(decimalPlaces);
        }
    };
})();

// test rounding of half
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(0.5));  // 1
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(-0.5)); // -1

// testing very small numbers
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.ceil(1e-8, 2) === 0.01);         // 0.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.floor(1e-8, 2) === 0);              // 0

// testing simple cases
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);       // -5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.ceil(5.12, 1) === 5.2);           // 5.2
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.ceil(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);        // -5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.floor(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.floor(-5.12, 1) === -5.2);       // -5.2
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.trunc(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.trunc(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);       // -5.1

// testing edge cases for round
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(1.005, 2) === 1.01);       // 1.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(39.425, 2) === 39.43);    // 39.43
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(-1.005, 2) === -1.01);    // -1.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(-39.425, 2) === -39.43); // -39.43

// testing edge cases for ceil
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.ceil(9.130, 2) === 9.13);        // 9.13
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.ceil(65.180, 2) === 65.18);     // 65.18
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.ceil(-2.260, 2) === -2.26);     // -2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.ceil(-18.150, 2) === -18.15);  // -18.15

// testing edge cases for floor
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.floor(2.260, 2) === 2.26);       // 2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.floor(18.150, 2) === 18.15);    // 18.15
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.floor(-9.130, 2) === -9.13);    // -9.13
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.floor(-65.180, 2) === -65.18); // -65.18

// testing edge cases for trunc
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.trunc(2.260, 2) === 2.26);       // 2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.trunc(18.150, 2) === 18.15);    // 18.15
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.trunc(-2.260, 2) === -2.26);    // -2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.trunc(-18.150, 2) === -18.15); // -18.15

// testing round to tens and hundreds
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(1262.48, -1) === 1260);    // 1260
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.round(1262.48, -2) === 1300);    // 1300

// testing toFixed()
console.log(DecimalPrecision2.toFixed(1.005, 2) === "1.01");   // "1.01"

Solution 3: double rounding

This solution uses the toPrecision() method to strip the floating-point round-off errors.

// Solution 3
var DecimalPrecision3 = (function() {
    if (Math.sign === undefined) {
        Math.sign = function(x) {
            return ((x > 0) - (x < 0)) || +x;
        };
    }
    if (Math.trunc === undefined) {
        Math.trunc = function(v) {
            return v < 0 ? Math.ceil(v) : Math.floor(v);
        };
    }
    // Eliminate binary floating-point inaccuracies.
    var stripError = function(num) {
        if (Number.isInteger(num))
            return num;
        return parseFloat(num.toPrecision(15));
    };
    var decimalAdjust = function(type, num, decimalPlaces) {
        var n = type === 'round' ? Math.abs(num) : num;
        var p = Math.pow(10, decimalPlaces || 0);
        var m = stripError(n * p);
        var r = Math[type](m) / p;
        return type === 'round' ? Math.sign(num) * r : r;
    };
    return {
        // Decimal round (half away from zero)
        round: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal ceil
        ceil: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('ceil', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal floor
        floor: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('floor', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal trunc
        trunc: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('trunc', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Format using fixed-point notation
        toFixed: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', num, decimalPlaces).toFixed(decimalPlaces);
        }
    };
})();

// test rounding of half
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(0.5));  // 1
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(-0.5)); // -1

// testing very small numbers
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.ceil(1e-8, 2) === 0.01);         // 0.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.floor(1e-8, 2) === 0);              // 0

// testing simple cases
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);       // -5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.ceil(5.12, 1) === 5.2);           // 5.2
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.ceil(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);        // -5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.floor(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.floor(-5.12, 1) === -5.2);       // -5.2
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.trunc(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.trunc(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);       // -5.1

// testing edge cases for round
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(1.005, 2) === 1.01);       // 1.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(39.425, 2) === 39.43);    // 39.43
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(-1.005, 2) === -1.01);    // -1.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(-39.425, 2) === -39.43); // -39.43

// testing edge cases for ceil
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.ceil(9.130, 2) === 9.13);        // 9.13
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.ceil(65.180, 2) === 65.18);     // 65.18
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.ceil(-2.260, 2) === -2.26);     // -2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.ceil(-18.150, 2) === -18.15);  // -18.15

// testing edge cases for floor
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.floor(2.260, 2) === 2.26);       // 2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.floor(18.150, 2) === 18.15);    // 18.15
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.floor(-9.130, 2) === -9.13);    // -9.13
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.floor(-65.180, 2) === -65.18); // -65.18

// testing edge cases for trunc
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.trunc(2.260, 2) === 2.26);       // 2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.trunc(18.150, 2) === 18.15);    // 18.15
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.trunc(-2.260, 2) === -2.26);    // -2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.trunc(-18.150, 2) === -18.15); // -18.15

// testing round to tens and hundreds
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(1262.48, -1) === 1260);    // 1260
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.round(1262.48, -2) === 1300);    // 1300

// testing toFixed()
console.log(DecimalPrecision3.toFixed(1.005, 2) === "1.01");   // "1.01"

Solution 4: double rounding v2

This solution is just like Solution 3, however it uses a custom toPrecision() function.

// Solution 4
var DecimalPrecision4 = (function() {
    if (Math.sign === undefined) {
        Math.sign = function(x) {
            return ((x > 0) - (x < 0)) || +x;
        };
    }
    if (Math.trunc === undefined) {
        Math.trunc = function(v) {
            return v < 0 ? Math.ceil(v) : Math.floor(v);
        };
    }
    var toPrecision = function(num, significantDigits) {
        // Return early for ±0, NaN and Infinity.
        if (!num || !Number.isFinite(num))
            return num;
        // Compute shift of the decimal point.
        var shift = significantDigits - 1 - Math.floor(Math.log10(Math.abs(num)));
        // Return if rounding to the same or higher precision.
        var decimalPlaces = 0;
        for (var p = 1; !Number.isInteger(num * p); p *= 10) decimalPlaces++;
        if (shift >= decimalPlaces)
            return num;
        // Round to sf-1 fractional digits of normalized mantissa x.dddd
        var scale = Math.pow(10, Math.abs(shift));
        return shift > 0 ?
            Math.round(num * scale) / scale :
            Math.round(num / scale) * scale;
    };
    // Eliminate binary floating-point inaccuracies.
    var stripError = function(num) {
        if (Number.isInteger(num))
            return num;
        return toPrecision(num, 15);
    };
    var decimalAdjust = function(type, num, decimalPlaces) {
        var n = type === 'round' ? Math.abs(num) : num;
        var p = Math.pow(10, decimalPlaces || 0);
        var m = stripError(n * p);
        var r = Math[type](m) / p;
        return type === 'round' ? Math.sign(num) * r : r;
    };
    return {
        // Decimal round (half away from zero)
        round: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal ceil
        ceil: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('ceil', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal floor
        floor: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('floor', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Decimal trunc
        trunc: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('trunc', num, decimalPlaces);
        },
        // Format using fixed-point notation
        toFixed: function(num, decimalPlaces) {
            return decimalAdjust('round', num, decimalPlaces).toFixed(decimalPlaces);
        }
    };
})();

// test rounding of half
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(0.5));  // 1
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(-0.5)); // -1

// testing very small numbers
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.ceil(1e-8, 2) === 0.01);         // 0.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.floor(1e-8, 2) === 0);              // 0

// testing simple cases
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);       // -5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.ceil(5.12, 1) === 5.2);           // 5.2
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.ceil(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);        // -5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.floor(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.floor(-5.12, 1) === -5.2);       // -5.2
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.trunc(5.12, 1) === 5.1);          // 5.1
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.trunc(-5.12, 1) === -5.1);       // -5.1

// testing edge cases for round
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(1.005, 2) === 1.01);       // 1.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(39.425, 2) === 39.43);    // 39.43
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(-1.005, 2) === -1.01);    // -1.01
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(-39.425, 2) === -39.43); // -39.43

// testing edge cases for ceil
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.ceil(9.130, 2) === 9.13);        // 9.13
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.ceil(65.180, 2) === 65.18);     // 65.18
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.ceil(-2.260, 2) === -2.26);     // -2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.ceil(-18.150, 2) === -18.15);  // -18.15

// testing edge cases for floor
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.floor(2.260, 2) === 2.26);       // 2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.floor(18.150, 2) === 18.15);    // 18.15
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.floor(-9.130, 2) === -9.13);    // -9.13
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.floor(-65.180, 2) === -65.18); // -65.18

// testing edge cases for trunc
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.trunc(2.260, 2) === 2.26);       // 2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.trunc(18.150, 2) === 18.15);    // 18.15
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.trunc(-2.260, 2) === -2.26);    // -2.26
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.trunc(-18.150, 2) === -18.15); // -18.15

// testing round to tens and hundreds
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(1262.48, -1) === 1260);    // 1260
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.round(1262.48, -2) === 1300);    // 1300

// testing toFixed()
console.log(DecimalPrecision4.toFixed(1.005, 2) === "1.01");   // "1.01"

Benchmarks

http://jsbench.github.io/#31ec3a8b3d22bd840f8e6822e681a3ac

Here is a benchmark comparing the operations per second in the solutions above on Chrome 85.0.4183.83. Obviously all browsers differ, so your mileage may vary.

Benchmark comparison (Note: More is better)

Thanks @Mike for adding a screenshot of the benchmark.

| improve this answer | |
  • Nice, I see that you did run a more thorough performance test on the difference. I just did a quick comparison in devtools and they came back with very similar variance in execution time, but I was wondering if the performance difference would begin to show at a really high volume/frequency. – KFish Aug 24 at 13:58
  • The second solution is easier to read and understand. Also it can be ported to other programming languages. – Amr Ali Aug 25 at 15:54
  • 2
    Ok, I just added it for you, as well as a screenshot of the benchmark. – Mike Sep 3 at 22:40
  • 1
    Thanks @Mike for updating the answer – Amr Ali Sep 3 at 22:54
  • 1
    Hey @AmrAli. This is an awesome answer. One of the few that are as accurate as possible. Thanks! 👍 I particularly like Solution 2 for it's speed. One thing I noticed is the speed can be increased by ~5-10% if the early-return check for isRound is removed. It adds more operations than just running the decimalAdjust function. Returning early by using isRound actually takes longer. – GollyJer Oct 16 at 5:47
23

MarkG and Lavamantis offered a much better solution than the one that has been accepted. It's a shame they don't get more upvotes!

Here is the function I use to solve the floating point decimals issues also based on MDN. It is even more generic (but less concise) than Lavamantis's solution:

function round(value, exp) {
  if (typeof exp === 'undefined' || +exp === 0)
    return Math.round(value);

  value = +value;
  exp  = +exp;

  if (isNaN(value) || !(typeof exp === 'number' && exp % 1 === 0))
    return NaN;

  // Shift
  value = value.toString().split('e');
  value = Math.round(+(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] + exp) : exp)));

  // Shift back
  value = value.toString().split('e');
  return +(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] - exp) : -exp));
}

Use it with:

round(10.8034, 2);      // Returns 10.8
round(1.275, 2);        // Returns 1.28
round(1.27499, 2);      // Returns 1.27
round(1.2345678e+2, 2); // Returns 123.46

Compared to Lavamantis's solution, we can do...

round(1234.5678, -2); // Returns 1200
round("123.45");      // Returns 123
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Your solution does not cover some cases as opposed to MDN's solution. While it may be shorter, it is not accurate... – astorije Jul 5 '15 at 21:42
  • 1
    round(-1835.665,2) => -1835.66 – Jorge Sampayo Jul 29 '16 at 1:38
21

The easiest approach would be to use toFixed and then strip trailing zeros using the Number function:

const number = 15.5;
Number(number.toFixed(2)); // 15.5
const number = 1.7777777;
Number(number.toFixed(2)); // 1.78
| improve this answer | |
  • this does not work for all cases. do extensive tests before posting answers. – baburao Apr 19 at 10:23
  • @baburao Please post a case in which the above solution doesn't work – Marcin Wanago Apr 20 at 10:05
  • const number = 15; Number(number.toFixed(2)); //15.00 instead of 15 – Kevin Jhangiani Apr 23 at 22:10
  • 1
    @KevinJhangiani const number = 15; Number(number.toFixed(2)); // 15 - I tested it both on newest Chrome and Firefox – Marcin Wanago Apr 24 at 11:22
  • @KevinJhangiani how do you get 15.00? Numbers in JS do not store the decimal places and any display automatically truncates excess decimal places (any zeroes at the end). – VLAZ May 18 at 11:18
17

It may work for you,

Math.round(num * 100)/100;

to know the difference between toFixed and round. You can have a look at Math.round(num) vs num.toFixed(0) and browser inconsistencies.

| improve this answer | |
16
var roundUpto = function(number, upto){
    return Number(number.toFixed(upto));
}
roundUpto(0.1464676, 2);

toFixed(2) here 2 is number of digits upto which we want to round this num.

| improve this answer | |
  • this .toFixed() is more simple to implement. just go through it once. – Ritesh Dhuri May 15 '15 at 7:19
15

One way to achieve such a rounding only if necessary is to use Number.prototype.toLocaleString():

myNumber.toLocaleString('en', {maximumFractionDigits:2, useGrouping:false})

This will provide exactly the output you expect, but as strings. You can still convert those back to numbers if that's not the data type you expect.

| improve this answer | |
  • This is the cleanest solution there is by far and sidesteps all the complicated floating point issues, but per MDN support is still incomplete - Safari doesn't support passing arguments to toLocaleString yet. – Mark Amery Jul 30 '16 at 23:12
  • @MarkAmery For now, only Android Browser have some issues: caniuse.com/#search=toLocaleString – ptyskju Jan 10 at 20:56
15

FINAL UPDATE:

Leaving this answer here for posterity, but I would recommend using @AmrAli's adaptation of the DecimalPrecision function, as it is equipped to handle exponential notation as well. I had originally sought to avoid any string conversion/manipulation of any kind for performance reasons, but there is virtually no difference in performance with his implementation.

EDIT 8/22/2020: I think it should be clarified here that the goal of these efforts is not to completely eliminate the inherent rounding errors caused by the floating point data type, as that will never be possible without switching to a data type that is actually storing the value as a base10 (decimal). The goal really should be to push the inaccuracies as far out to the edge as possible, so that you can perform mathematical operations on a given value without producing the bug. The moment your value hits the absolute edge, where simply invoking the value would cause JS to produce the bug, either before or after you've manipulated it, there's nothing more you could do to alleviate that. For example, if you instantiate the value 0.014999999999999999, JS will immediately round it to 0.015. Therefore if you passed that value to any of these functions, you are actually passing 0.015. At that point you couldn't even convert to string first and then manipulate it, the value would have to be instantiated as a string from the start for that to work. The goal, and only reasonable expectation, of any functions created to alleviate this bug is simply to allow for mathematical operations to be performed on floating point values while pushing the bug all the way out to the edge where either the starting value, or resulting value would produce the bug simply by being invoked anyway. The only other alternative solutions would be to store the whole numbers and decimal values independently, both as integers, so that they are only ever invoked as such, or to always store the value as a string and use a combination of string manipulation and integer based math to perform operations on it.

After running through various iterations of all the possible ways to achieve true accurate decimal rounding precision, it is clear that the most accurate and efficient solution is to use Number.EPSILON. This provides a true mathematical solution to the problem of floating point math precision. It can be easily polyfilled as shown here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Number/EPSILON to support all of the last remaining IE users (then again maybe we should stop doing that).

Adapted from the solution provided here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/48850944/6910392

A simple drop in solution that provides accurate decimal rounding, flooring, and ceiling, with an optional precision variable without adding a whole library.

05-19-2020 UPDATE: As Sergey noted in the comments, there is a limitation to this (or any) method that's worth pointing out. In the case of numbers like 0.014999999999999999, you will still experience inaccuracies which are the result of hitting the absolute edge of accuracy limitations for floating point value storage. There is no math or other solution that can be applied to account for that, as the value itself is immediately evaluated as 0.015. You can confirm this by simply invoking that value by itself in the console. Due to this limitation, it would not even be possible to use string manipulation to reduce this value, as its string representation is simply "0.015". Any solution to account for this would need to be applied logically at the source of the data before ever accepting the value into a script, eg restricting the character length of a field etc. That would be a consideration that would need to be taken into account on a case by case basis to determine the best approach.

08-19-2020 UPDATE: Per Amr's comment, the ceil and floor functions will produce undesired results when the input value is an integer. This is due to the addition applied to the input with Number.EPSILON in order to offset the expected float inaccuracy. The function has been updated to check if the input value is an integer and return the value unchanged, as that is the correct result of either function when applied to a whole number.

*Note: This issue also reveals that while the ceil and floor functions still require the application of the Number.EPSILON adjustment, they do produce undesirable results when applied to a value where the number of decimals in the input number is lower than the number of decimals requested for the output (p). For example, ceil(17.1, 5) should return 17.1 in relation to expected "ceil" function behavior when applied to whole numbers in mathematics, where all decimal places after "1" are assumed to be 0. To correct for this, I've added an additional function check to identify if the number of decimals in the input number is lower than the requested output decimals, and return the number unchanged, just as with whole numbers.

var DecimalPrecision = (function(){
        if (Number.EPSILON === undefined) {
            Number.EPSILON = Math.pow(2, -52);
        }
        if(Number.isInteger === undefined){
            Number.isInteger = function(value) {
                return typeof value === 'number' && 
                isFinite(value) && 
                Math.floor(value) === value;
            };
        }
        this.isRound = function(n,p){
            let l = n.toString().split('.')[1].length;
            return (p >= l);
        }
        this.round = function(n, p=2){
            if(Number.isInteger(n) || this.isRound(n,p))
                return n;
            let r = 0.5 * Number.EPSILON * n;
            let o = 1; while(p-- > 0) o *= 10;
            if(n<0)
                o *= -1;
            return Math.round((n + r) * o) / o;
        }
        this.ceil = function(n, p=2){
            if(Number.isInteger(n) || this.isRound(n,p))
                return n;
            let r = 0.5 * Number.EPSILON * n;
            let o = 1; while(p-- > 0) o *= 10;
            
            return Math.ceil((n + r) * o) / o;
        }
        this.floor = function(n, p=2){
            if(Number.isInteger(n) || this.isRound(n,p))
                return n;
            let r = 0.5 * Number.EPSILON * n;
            let o = 1; while(p-- > 0) o *= 10;
            
            return Math.floor((n + r) * o) / o;
        }
        return this;
    })();
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(1.005));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(1.005));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.floor(1.005));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(1.0049999));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(1.0049999));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.floor(1.0049999));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(2.175495134384,7));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(2.1753543549,8));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.round(2.1755465135353,4));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(17,4));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(17.1,4));
    console.log(DecimalPrecision.ceil(17.1,15));

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    (DecimalPrecision.round(0.014999999999999999, 2)) // returns 0.02 – Sergey May 12 at 14:42
  • Good catch! The problem is with floating point storage in JS, there is always going to be some edge cases. The good news is that the math that you apply to Number.EPSILON first can be more finely tuned to push those edge cases further out on the edge. If you want to guarantee no possibility for edge cases your only real solution is going to be string manipulation, and then the math. The moment you perform any mathematical computation on the value (even in trying to move the decimal), then you have already produced the bug. – KFish May 14 at 18:42
  • Actually, on further inspection, this is not due to any of the math involved, but rather the problem manifests immediately upon invoking the specified value. You can confirm this simply by typing that number into the console and see that it immediately evaluates to 0.015. Therefore, this would represent the absolute edge of accuracy for any floating point number in JS. In this case you couldn't even convert to string and manipulate as the string value would be "0.015" – KFish May 19 at 1:06
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    @KFish DecimalPrecision.ceil(17,0); // 18 and DecimalPrecision.ceil(17,1); // 17.1 – Amr Ali Aug 17 at 19:56
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    @KFish DecimalPrecision.ceil(-5.12, 1); // -5.2 and DecimalPrecision.floor(-5.12, 1); // -5.1 – Amr Ali Aug 20 at 21:44
14

Easiest way:

+num.toFixed(2)

It converts it to a string, and then back into an integer / float.

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  • Thanks for this simplest answer. However, what is '+' in +num? It didn't work for me where the decimal val came in string. I did: (num * 1).toFixed(2). – Ethan Mar 22 '15 at 8:21
  • @momo just change the argument to toFixed() to 3. So it would be +num.toFixed(3). That's working the way it's supposed to, 1.005 is rounded to 1.00, which is equal to 1 – bigpotato May 4 '15 at 16:13
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    @Edmund It's supposed to return 1.01, not 1.00 – mmm May 5 '15 at 19:20
13

Here is a prototype method:

Number.prototype.round = function(places){
    places = Math.pow(10, places); 
    return Math.round(this * places)/places;
}

var yournum = 10.55555;
yournum = yournum.round(2);
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13

Use something like this "parseFloat(parseFloat(value).toFixed(2))"

parseFloat(parseFloat("1.7777777").toFixed(2))-->1.78 
parseFloat(parseFloat("10").toFixed(2))-->10 
parseFloat(parseFloat("9.1").toFixed(2))-->9.1
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  • 1
    not if the inaccuracy is intrinsic to the float representation. you would just be removing it and then reintroducing the same error by converting back to float again! – Ben McIntyre Oct 28 '18 at 20:00

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