2829

I'd like to round at most 2 decimal places, but only if necessary.

Input:

10
1.7777777
9.1

Output:

10
1.78
9.1

How can I do this in JavaScript?

  • 22
    I made a fiddle with many of the techniques offered as solutions here ... so you can compare: fiddle – dsdsdsdsd Nov 18 '13 at 9:45
  • 42
    No one seems to be aware of Number.EPSILON. Use Math.round( num * 100 + Number.EPSILON ) / 100. – cronvel Jan 18 '17 at 9:59
  • 3
    For new readers, you can't do this unless you have a string type result. Floating point maths on binary internal representations of numbers means there are always numbers that cannot be represented as neat decimals. – Walf Feb 20 '18 at 1:42
  • 9
    @cronvel Can you explain the reason of using Number.EPSILON here? – Bruce Sun Oct 19 '18 at 3:10
  • 6
    I fell down the rabbit hole and tested some of the more interesting answers on this page (first page only). Here's a Codepen. Hint: the more upvotes the answer has, the lower are chances it works properly. – Adam Jagosz Aug 28 '19 at 16:39

79 Answers 79

11

To not deal with many 0s, use this variant:

Math.round(num * 1e2) / 1e2
| improve this answer | |
11

This is the simplest, more elegant solution (and I am the best of the world;):

function roundToX(num, X) {    
    return +(Math.round(num + "e+"+X)  + "e-"+X);
}
//roundToX(66.66666666,2) => 66.67
//roundToX(10,2) => 10
//roundToX(10.904,2) => 10.9
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    That's a nice way to rewrite the accepted answer to accept an argument using E notation. – AxelH Nov 25 '16 at 8:48
  • 1
    This doesn't work in some edge cases: try (jsfiddle) roundToX(362.42499999999995, 2). Expected result (as in PHP echo round(362.42499999999995, 2)): 362.43. Actual result: 362.42 – Dr. Gianluigi Zane Zanettini Dec 6 '17 at 13:27
  • 6
    IMHO, your PHP result is wrong. No matter what comes after the third decimal, if the third decimal is lower than 5, then the second decimal should remain the same. That's the mathematical definition. – Soldeplata Saketos Dec 6 '17 at 20:08
  • 1
    To be even more concise "e+" can just be "e" instead. – Lonnie Best Jan 22 '19 at 6:58
9

If you happen to already be using the d3 library, they have a powerful number formatting library: https://github.com/mbostock/d3/wiki/Formatting

Rounding specifically is here: https://github.com/mbostock/d3/wiki/Formatting#d3_round

In your case, the answer is:

> d3.round(1.777777, 2)
1.78
> d3.round(1.7, 2)
1.7
> d3.round(1, 2)
1
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Looking at the source, this is nothing more than a generalized version of @ustasb answer, using num * Math.pow(n) instead of num * 100 (but it's definitely a neat one-liner ;-) – svvac Jun 18 '14 at 14:23
  • But documented, and, being in a library, I don't have the same need to check browser compatibility BS. – Scott Stafford Jun 19 '14 at 18:11
  • using Math.pow(n) allows for d3.round(12, -1) == 10 – daviestar Aug 5 '14 at 9:25
9

A simpler ES6 way is

const round = (x, n) => 
  Number(parseFloat(Math.round(x * Math.pow(10, n)) / Math.pow(10, n)).toFixed(n));

This pattern also returns the precision asked for.

ex:

round(44.7826456, 4)  // yields 44.7826
round(78.12, 4)       // yields 78.12
| improve this answer | |
  • Unfortunately, your approach adds zeros at the end that are not necessary. I think the solution to the posted question should result in 78.12 instead of 78.1200. – Marcin Wanago Apr 23 at 16:57
  • @MarcinWanago good catch, I overlooked that in the OP's question. I've updated my example. Thank you. – Adam A. Apr 29 at 2:06
8

A different approach is to use a library. Why not lodash:

const _ = require("lodash")
const roundedNumber = _.round(originalNumber, 2)
| improve this answer | |
8

Keep type as integer for later sorting or other math operations:

Math.round(1.7777777 * 100)/100

1.78

// Round up!
Math.ceil(1.7777777 * 100)/100 

1.78

// Round down!
Math.floor(1.7777777 * 100)/100

1.77

Or convert to string:

(1.7777777).toFixed(2)

"1.77"

| improve this answer | |
7

Simple solution would be use lodash's ceil function if you want to round up...

https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.10#ceil

_.round(6.001,2)

gives 6

_.ceil(6.001, 2);

gives 6.01

_.ceil(37.4929,2);

gives 37.5

_.round(37.4929,2);

gives 37.49

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    There is no sense in importing new dependency, just to make rounding. – Dmytro Medvid Aug 2 '18 at 12:04
  • It is very funny that you don't use lodash already in your javascript project considering the kind of features lodash provides... – Jinxer Albatross Aug 2 '18 at 13:33
  • 1
    which already has native implementation... I'm not saying that lodash (underscore) is useless, I'm just saying, that there is no sense to lodash in case you only need rounding. Of course if you like and use it on everyday basis and whole your project full of lodash calls - it is make sense. – Dmytro Medvid Aug 2 '18 at 14:37
7

parseFloat("1.555").toFixed(2); // Returns 1.55 instead of 1.56.

1.55 is the absolute correct result, because there exists no exact representation of 1.555 in the computer. If reading 1.555 it is rounded to the nearest possible value = 1.55499999999999994 (64 bit float). And rounding this number by toFixed(2) results in 1.55.

All other functions provided here give fault result, if the input is 1.55499999999999.

Solution: Append the digit "5" before scanning to rounding up (more exact: rounding away from 0) the number. Do this only, if the number is really a float (has a decimal point).

parseFloat("1.555"+"5").toFixed(2); // Returns 1.56
| improve this answer | |
6

I'll add one more approach to this.

number = 16.6666666;
console.log(parseFloat(number.toFixed(2)));
"16.67"

number = 16.6;
console.log(parseFloat(number.toFixed(2)));
"16.6"

number = 16;
console.log(parseFloat(number.toFixed(2)));
"16"

.toFixed(2) returns a string with exactily 2 decimal points, that may or may not be trailing zeros. Doing a parseFloat() will eliminate those trailing zeros.

| improve this answer | |
6

This did the trick for me (TypeScript):

round(decimal: number, decimalPoints: number): number{
    let roundedValue = Math.round(decimal * Math.pow(10, decimalPoints)) / Math.pow(10, decimalPoints);

    console.log(`Rounded ${decimal} to ${roundedValue}`);
    return roundedValue;
}

// Sample output:
Rounded 18.339840000000436 to 18.34
Rounded 52.48283999999984 to 52.48
Rounded 57.24612000000036 to 57.25
Rounded 23.068320000000142 to 23.07
Rounded 7.792980000000398 to 7.79
Rounded 31.54157999999981 to 31.54
Rounded 36.79686000000004 to 36.8
Rounded 34.723080000000124 to 34.72
Rounded 8.4375 to 8.44
Rounded 15.666960000000074 to 15.67
Rounded 29.531279999999924 to 29.53
Rounded 8.277420000000006 to 8.28
| improve this answer | |
6

Based on the choosen answer and the upvoted comment on the same question:

Math.round((num + 0.00001) * 100) / 100

This works for both these examples:

Math.round((1.005 + 0.00001) * 100) / 100

Math.round((1.0049 + 0.00001) * 100) / 100
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This function fails for 1.004999 – Wiimm Feb 22 '19 at 9:10
5

I know there are many answers, but most of them have side effect in some specific cases.

Easiest and shortest solution without any side effects is following:

Number((2.3456789).toFixed(2)) // 2.35

It rounds properly and returns number instead of string

console.log(Number((2.345).toFixed(2)))  // 2.35
console.log(Number((2.344).toFixed(2)))  // 2.34
console.log(Number((2).toFixed(2)))      // 2
console.log(Number((-2).toFixed(2)))     // -2
console.log(Number((-2.345).toFixed(2))) // -2.35

console.log(Number((2.345678).toFixed(3))) // 2.346
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    console.log(Number((1.005).toFixed(2))) still gives "1.00" instead of "1.01" – Eagle Apr 10 '18 at 20:05
4

Here is the shortest and complete answer:

function round(num, decimals) {
        var n = Math.pow(10, decimals);
        return Math.round( (n * num).toFixed(decimals) )  / n;
};

This also takes care of the example case 1.005 which will return 1.01.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Still fails for some number. Try round(1234.00000254495, 10) where it will return 1234.0000025449. The method by Mozilla correctly, which you commented on, properly rounds that value. – LostInComputer May 11 '15 at 10:59
  • @LostInComputer (10.00000254495).toFixed(10) returns "10.0000025450", (100.00000254495).toFixed(10) returns "100.0000025449", and guess what (100.00000254495).toFixed(10) returns? Yes: "1000.0000025450". So the problem is more of other reasons than this method. Try this: console.log(1234578.9012345689) ... If you move the the dot right, then the number is going to grow and you won't get as many decimals. You can't get more than 18 numbers total ( in this example ). Then try this: console.log(123455.00000254495), it will output 123455.00000254496. That's how the browsers handle numbers. – mmm May 11 '15 at 12:37
  • 3
    Sorry, wrong explanation. Plus, Mozilla's implementation - at the bottom of the page and also posted here, can properly round that number. TLDR: Mozilla passes my test case. Yours don't – LostInComputer May 12 '15 at 2:09
4

To round at decimal positions pos (including no decimals) do Math.round(num * Math.pow(10,pos)) / Math.pow(10,pos)

var console = {
 log: function(s) {
  document.getElementById("console").innerHTML += s + "<br/>"
 }
}
var roundDecimals=function(num,pos) {
 return (Math.round(num * Math.pow(10,pos)) / Math.pow(10,pos) );
}
//https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi
var pi=3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510;
for(var i=2;i<15;i++) console.log("pi="+roundDecimals(pi,i));
for(var i=15;i>=0;--i) console.log("pi="+roundDecimals(pi,i));
<div id="console" />

| improve this answer | |
4

Try to use the jQuery .number plug-in:

var number = 19.8000000007;
var res = 1 * $.number(number, 2);
| improve this answer | |
4

I was building a simple tipCalculator and there was a lot of answers here that seem to overcomplicate the issue. So I found summarizing the issue to be the best way to truly answer this question

if you want to create a rounded decimal number, first you call toFixed(# of decimal places you want to keep) and then wrap that in a Number()

so end result:

let amountDue = 286.44;
tip = Number((amountDue * 0.2).toFixed(2));
console.log(tip)  // 57.29 instead of 57.288
| improve this answer | |
  • This does not answer the question, which was about rounding and getting back a number. toFixed simply truncates the value and returns a string. Number(1.005).toFixed(2) => "1.00" – brainbag Jul 17 '18 at 22:10
  • And this solution also doesn't go with the "only if necessary" part of the question: Number(10).toFixed(2) => "10.00" – GriffoGoes Oct 24 '18 at 19:36
3

You could also override the Math.round function to do the rounding correct and add a parameter for decimals and use it like: Math.round(Number, Decimals). Keep in mind that this overrides the built in component Math.round and giving it another property then it original is.

var round = Math.round;
Math.round = function (value, decimals) {
  decimals = decimals || 0;
  return Number(round(value + 'e' + decimals) + 'e-' + decimals);
}

Then you can simply use it like this:

Math.round(1.005, 2);

https://jsfiddle.net/k5tpq3pd/3/

| improve this answer | |
3

Here is a function I came up with to do "round up". I used double Math.round to compensate for JavaScript's inaccurate multiplying, so 1.005 will be correctly rounded as 1.01.

function myRound(number, decimalplaces){
    if(decimalplaces > 0){
        var multiply1 = Math.pow(10,(decimalplaces + 4));
        var divide1 = Math.pow(10, decimalplaces);
        return Math.round(Math.round(number * multiply1)/10000 )/divide1;
    }
    if(decimalplaces < 0){
        var divide2 = Math.pow(10, Math.abs(decimalplaces));
        var multiply2 = Math.pow(10, Math.abs(decimalplaces));
        return Math.round(Math.round(number / divide2) * multiply2);
    }
    return Math.round(number);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I tested it again, and it works for me.. (alert( myRound(1234.56789, 2) ); //1234.57 ) May-be you get confused by multiple "return" statements? – Andrei Sep 19 '13 at 6:18
  • An upvote as this maybe a long winded way of doing it but it works. – Ashutosh May 26 '14 at 10:52
3

I wrote the following set of functions for myself. Maybe it will help you too.

function float_exponent(number) {
    exponent = 1;
    while (number < 1.0) {
        exponent += 1
        number *= 10
    }
    return exponent;
}
function format_float(number, extra_precision) {
    precision = float_exponent(number) + (extra_precision || 0)
    return number.toFixed(precision).split(/\.?0+$/)[0]
}

Usage:

format_float(1.01); // 1
format_float(1.06); // 1.1
format_float(0.126); // 0.13
format_float(0.000189); // 0.00019

For you case:

format_float(10, 1); // 10
format_float(9.1, 1); // 9.1
format_float(1.77777, 1); // 1.78
| improve this answer | |
3

The rounding problem can be avoided by using numbers represented in exponential notation.

public roundFinancial(amount: number, decimals: number) {
    return Number(Math.round(Number(`${amount}e${decimals}`)) + `e-${decimals}`);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • this doesn't look like javascript to me, and chrome doesn't accept it - VM82:1 Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected identifier – hanshenrik Oct 16 '18 at 16:03
  • This is TypeScript, but after changing to function round(amount, decimals) { return Number(Math.round(Number(`${amount}e${decimals}`)) + `e-${decimals}`); } it seems to do the job well. – Adam Jagosz Aug 28 '19 at 16:19
3

A simple general rounding function could be following:

Steps are:

  1. Multiply the number by (10 to the power of number of decimal place) using Math.pow(10,places).
  2. Round the result to whole integer using Math.Round.
  3. Divide the result back by (10 to the power of number of decimal place) Math.pow(10,places).

Example:

number is: 1.2375 to be rounded to 3 decimal places

  1. 1.2375 * (10^3) ==> 1.2375 * 1000 = 1237.5
  2. Round to integer ==> 1238
  3. Divide 1238 by (10^3) ==> 1238 / 1000 = 1.238

(note: 10^3 means Math.pow(10,3)).

 function numberRoundDecimal(v,n) {
 return Math.round((v+Number.EPSILON)*Math.pow(10,n))/Math.pow(10,n)}


// ------- tests --------
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(-0.024641163062896567,3))  // -0.025
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(0.9993360575508052,3))     // 0.999
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(1.0020739645577939,3))     // 1.002
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(0.975,0))                  // 1
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(0.975,1))                  // 1
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(0.975,2))                  // 0.98
console.log(numberRoundDecimal(1.005,2))                  // 1.01

| improve this answer | |
  • I would recommend you to add some more details in your answer. The question has thousands of upvotes and your answer is really good, but you can add some more info to gain more "popularity" and reputation. – georgekrax May 22 at 18:54
  • @georgekrax thanks. Updated with additional explanations. – Mohsen Alyafei May 22 at 20:36
  • 1
    Great! Useful content provided. However, try to answer questions that are new and do not have any other answers, because it is more likely to get reputation – georgekrax May 22 at 21:04
2

Just for the record, the scaling method could theoretically return Infinity if the number and the digits you want to round to are big enough. In JavaScript that shouldn't be a problem since the maximum number is 1.7976931348623157e+308, but if you're working with really big numbers or a lot of decimal places you could try this function instead:

Number.prototype.roundTo = function(digits)
{
    var str = this.toString();
    var split = this.toString().split('e');
    var scientific = split.length > 1;
    var index;
    if (scientific)
    {
        str = split[0];
        var decimal = str.split('.');
        if (decimal.length < 2)
            return this;
        index = decimal[0].length + 1 + digits;
    }
    else
        index = Math.floor(this).toString().length + 1 + digits;
    if (str.length <= index)
        return this;
    var digit = str[index + 1];
    var num = Number.parseFloat(str.substring(0, index));
    if (digit >= 5)
    {
        var extra = Math.pow(10, -digits);
        return this < 0 ? num - extra : num + extra;
    }
    if (scientific)
        num += "e" + split[1];
    return num;
}

| improve this answer | |
2

From the existing answers I found another solution which seems to work great, which also works with sending in a string and eliminates trailing zeros.

function roundToDecimal(string, decimals) {
    return parseFloat(parseFloat(string).toFixed(decimals));
}

It doesn't take in to account if you send in some bull.. like "apa" though. Or it will probably throw an error which I think is the proper way anyway, it's never good to hide errors that should be fixed (by the calling function).

| improve this answer | |
2

This worked pretty well for me when wanting to always round up to a certain decimal. The key here is that we will always be rounding up with the Math.ceil function.

You could conditionally select ceil or floor if needed.

     /**
     * Possibility to lose precision at large numbers
     * @param number
     * @returns Number number
     */
    var roundUpToNearestHundredth = function(number) {

        // Ensure that we use high precision Number
        number = Number(number);

        // Save the original number so when we extract the Hundredth decimal place we don't bit switch or lose precision
        var numberSave = Number(number.toFixed(0));

        // Remove the "integer" values off the top of the number
        number = number - numberSave;

        // Get the Hundredth decimal places
        number *= 100;

        // Ceil the decimals.  Therefore .15000001 will equal .151, etc.
        number = Math.ceil(number);

        // Put the decimals back into their correct spot
        number /= 100;

        // Add the "integer" back onto the number
        return number + numberSave;

    };

console.log(roundUpToNearestHundredth(6132423.1200000000001))

| improve this answer | |
2

The big challenge on this seemingly simple task is that we want it to yield psychologically expected results even if the input contains minimal rounding errors to start with (not mentioning the errors which will happen within our calculation). If we know that the real result is exactly 1.005, we expect that rounding to two digits yields 1.01, even if the 1.005 is the result of a large computation with loads of rounding errors on the way.

The problem becomes even more obvious when dealing with floor() instead of round(). For example, when cutting everything away after the last two digits behind the dot of 33.3, we would certainly not expect to get 33.29 as a result, but that is what happens:

console.log(Math.floor(33.3 * 100) / 100)

In simple cases, the solution is to perform calculation on strings instead of floating point numbers, and thus avoid rounding errors completely. However, this option fails at the first non-trivial mathematical operation (including most divsions), and it is slow.

When operating on floating point numbers, the solution is to introduce a parameter which names the amount by which we are willing to deviate from the actual computation result, in order to output the psychologically expected result.

var round = function(num, digits = 2, compensateErrors = 2) {
  if (num < 0) {
    return -this.round(-num, digits, compensateErrors);
  }
  const pow = Math.pow(10, digits);
  return (Math.round(num * pow * (1 + compensateErrors * Number.EPSILON)) / pow);
}

/* --- testing --- */

console.log("Edge cases mentioned in this thread:")
var values = [ 0.015, 1.005, 5.555, 156893.145, 362.42499999999995, 1.275, 1.27499, 1.2345678e+2, 2.175, 5.015, 58.9 * 0.15 ];
values.forEach((n) => {
  console.log(n + " -> " + round(n));
  console.log(-n + " -> " + round(-n));
});

console.log("\nFor numbers which are so large that rounding cannot be performed anyway within computation precision, only string-based computation can help.")
console.log("Standard: " + round(1e+19));
console.log("Compensation = 1: " + round(1e+19, 2, 1));
console.log("Effectively no compensation: " + round(1e+19, 2, 0.4));

Note: Internet Explorer does not know Number.EPSILON. If you are in the unhappy position of still having to support it, you can use a shim, or just define the constant yourself for that specific browser family.

| improve this answer | |
2

Here's my solution to this problem:

function roundNumber(number, precision = 0) {
var num = number.toString().replace(",", "");
var integer, decimal, significantDigit;

if (num.indexOf(".") > 0 && num.substring(num.indexOf(".") + 1).length > precision && precision > 0) {
    integer = parseInt(num).toString();
    decimal = num.substring(num.indexOf(".") + 1);
    significantDigit = Number(decimal.substr(precision, 1));

    if (significantDigit >= 5) {
        decimal = (Number(decimal.substr(0, precision)) + 1).toString();
        return integer + "." + decimal;
    } else {
        decimal = (Number(decimal.substr(0, precision)) + 1).toString();
        return integer + "." + decimal;
    }
}
else if (num.indexOf(".") > 0) {
    integer = parseInt(num).toString();
    decimal = num.substring(num.indexOf(".") + 1);
    significantDigit = num.substring(num.length - 1, 1);

    if (significantDigit >= 5) {
        decimal = (Number(decimal) + 1).toString();
        return integer + "." + decimal;
    } else {            
        return integer + "." + decimal;
    }
} 

return number;
}
| improve this answer | |
2

the question is to rounds of 2 decimal.

let's not make this complicated modifying prototype chain etc..

here is one line solution

let round2dec = num => Math.round(num * 100) / 100; 

console.log(round2dec(1.77));
console.log(round2dec(1.774));
console.log(round2dec(1.777));
console.log(round2dec(10));

| improve this answer | |
2

A slight variation on this is if you need to format a currency amount as either being a whole amount of currency or an amount with fractional currency parts.

For example:

1 should output $1

1.1 should output $1.10

1.01 should output $1.01

Assuming amount is a number:

const formatAmount = (amount) => amount % 1 === 0 ? amount : amount.toFixed(2);

If amount is not a number then use parseFloat(amount) to convert it to a number.

| improve this answer | |
2

Mathematic floor and round definitions

enter image description here

lead us to

let round= x=> ( x+0.005 - (x+0.005)%0.01 +'' ).replace(/(\...)(.*)/,'$1');

// for case like 1.384 we need to use regexp to get only 2 digits after dot
// and cut off machine-error (epsilon)

console.log(round(10));
console.log(round(1.7777777));
console.log(round(1.7747777));
console.log(round(1.384));

| improve this answer | |
1

I just wanted to share my approach, based on previously mentioned answers:

Let's create a function that rounds any given numeric value to a given amount of decimal places:

function roundWDecimals(n, decimals) {
    if (!isNaN(parseFloat(n)) && isFinite(n)) {
        if (typeof(decimals) == typeof(undefined)) {
            decimals = 0;
        }
        var decimalPower = Math.pow(10, decimals);
        return Math.round(parseFloat(n) * decimalPower) / decimalPower;
    }
    return NaN;
}

And introduce a new "round" method for numbers prototype:

Object.defineProperty(Number.prototype, 'round', {
    enumerable: false,
    value: function(decimals) {
        return roundWDecimals(this, decimals);
    }
});

And you can test it:

function roundWDecimals(n, decimals) {
    if (!isNaN(parseFloat(n)) && isFinite(n)) {
        if (typeof(decimals) == typeof(undefined)) {
            decimals = 0;
        }
        var decimalPower = Math.pow(10, decimals);
        return Math.round(parseFloat(n) * decimalPower) / decimalPower;
    }
    return NaN;
}
Object.defineProperty(Number.prototype, 'round', {
    enumerable: false,
    value: function(decimals) {
        return roundWDecimals(this, decimals);
    }
});

var roundables = [
    {num: 10, decimals: 2},
    {num: 1.7777777, decimals: 2},
    {num: 9.1, decimals: 2},
    {num: 55.55, decimals: 1},
    {num: 55.549, decimals: 1},
    {num: 55, decimals: 0},
    {num: 54.9, decimals: 0},
    {num: -55.55, decimals: 1},
    {num: -55.551, decimals: 1},
    {num: -55, decimals: 0},
    {num: 1.005, decimals: 2},
    {num: 1.005, decimals: 2},
    {num: 19.8000000007, decimals: 2},
  ],
  table = '<table border="1"><tr><th>Num</th><th>Decimals</th><th>Result</th></tr>';
$.each(roundables, function() {
  table +=
    '<tr>'+
      '<td>'+this.num+'</td>'+
      '<td>'+this.decimals+'</td>'+
      '<td>'+this.num.round(this.decimals)+'</td>'+
    '</tr>'
  ;
});
table += '</table>';
$('.results').append(table);
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="results"></div>

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