23

I can't seem to find anything that tells me if a port in my router is open or not. Is this even possible?

The code I have right now doesn't really seem to work...

private void ScanPort()
{
    string hostname = "localhost";
    int portno = 9081;
    IPAddress ipa = (IPAddress) Dns.GetHostAddresses(hostname)[0];
    try
    {
        System.Net.Sockets.Socket sock =
                new System.Net.Sockets.Socket(System.Net.Sockets.AddressFamily.InterNetwork,
                                              System.Net.Sockets.SocketType.Stream,
                                              System.Net.Sockets.ProtocolType.Tcp);
        sock.Connect(ipa, portno);
        if (sock.Connected == true) // Port is in use and connection is successful
            MessageBox.Show("Port is Closed");
        sock.Close();
    }
    catch (System.Net.Sockets.SocketException ex)
    {
        if (ex.ErrorCode == 10061) // Port is unused and could not establish connection 
            MessageBox.Show("Port is Open!");
        else
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
    }
}
  • How does it fail? Are the results not as you expected, are you getting an exception? – TheEvilPenguin Aug 7 '12 at 0:08
  • also if your code connects to the port it should say port is open not closed – Clinton Ward Aug 7 '12 at 0:26
  • @TheEvilPenguin I want it to say that my port is open because I forwarded it in my router, but it's failing to connect... – Yuki Kutsuya Aug 7 '12 at 0:30
36

Try this:

using(TcpClient tcpClient = new TcpClient())
{
    try {
        tcpClient.Connect("127.0.0.1", 9081);
        Console.WriteLine("Port open");
    } catch (Exception) {
        Console.WriteLine("Port closed");
    }
}

You should probably change 127.0.0.1 to something like 192.168.0.1 or whatever your router's IP address is.

  • 1
    It still doesn't work if I use 192.168.1.1 – Yuki Kutsuya Aug 7 '12 at 0:45
  • what happens when you try to use the code? – Clinton Ward Aug 7 '12 at 1:56
  • It says that it can not connect even if the port is open. – Yuki Kutsuya Aug 7 '12 at 14:12
  • that means nothing is listening on that port. Make sure your router is port forwarding to your pc and have a program open and listening on that port and it will connect. Also you should try to connect using your outside world address. Look up my ip in google and use that ip address. – Clinton Ward Aug 7 '12 at 14:35
  • I did, but then again, is it possible to detect if that port is open without having a program that uses the port? – Yuki Kutsuya Aug 7 '12 at 20:50
22

A better solution where you can even specify a timeout:

bool IsPortOpen(string host, int port, TimeSpan timeout)
{
    try
    {
        using(var client = new TcpClient())
        {
            var result = client.BeginConnect(host, port, null, null);
            var success = result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout);
            if (!success)
            {
                return false;
            }

            client.EndConnect(result);
        }

    }
    catch
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

And, in F#:

let IsPortOpen (host: string, port: int, timeout: TimeSpan): bool =
    let canConnect =
        try
            use client = new TcpClient()
            let result = client.BeginConnect(host, port, null, null)
            let success = result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout)
            match success with
            | false -> false
            | true ->
                   client.EndConnect(result)
                   true
        with
        | _ -> (); false
    canConnect
  • How performant is this method? Especially in F#? I'm working on a thesis for a network protocol and part of the (pre)process is to compose a list of available ports. – czifro Oct 23 '16 at 19:41
  • it should be as performant as the C# one... but measure it yourself just in case? – ympostor Nov 8 '16 at 5:00
  • could this same pattern be used for System.Net.Sockets.UdpClient ? – tatmanblue Dec 21 '16 at 23:01
  • no idea sorry, try it and let us know? – ympostor Dec 22 '16 at 4:17
  • Love the F# implementation, thank you for providing that. – Max Young Jul 23 '18 at 14:37
3

If you're connecting to the loopback adapterlocalhost or 127.0.0.1 (there's no place like 127.0.0.1!), you're unlikely to ever go out to the router. The OS is smart enough to recognize that it's a special address. Dunno if that holds true as well if you actually specify your machine's "real" IP address.

See also this question: What is the purpose of the Microsoft Loopback Adapter?

Also note that running traceroute localhost (tracert localhost in Windows) shows that the only network node involved is your own machine. The router is never involved.

2

There is no way to know if the port is forwarded in your router, except if there is a program listening on that port.

As you may see in the Clinton answer, the .Net class being used is TcpClient and that is because you are using a TCP socket to connect to. That is the way operating systems make connections: using a socket. However, a router just forwards the packets (layer 3 of the OSI Model) in or out. In your case, what your router is doing is called: NAT. It is one public IP shared by a one or more private IPs. That´s why you are making a port forwarding.

There may be a lot of routers in the path of the packets, and you will never know what had happened.

Let´s imagine you are sending a letter in the traditional way. Perhaps you can write in the letter that the receiver must answer, in order to check he/she is there (you and the receiver are the sockets). If you receive an answer you will be sure he/she is there, but if you don´t receive anything you don´t know if the mailman (in your case the router) forgot to deliver the letter, or the receiver hadn´t answered. You would also never know if the mailman has asked a friend to deliver that letter. Moreover, the mailman won´t open the letter in order to know he/she may answer because you are waiting for a reply. All you may do is wait some time to receive the answer. If you don´t receive anything in that period you will assume that the receiver isn´t where you sent the letter. That is a "timeout".

I saw an answer mentioning the nmap software. It´s really a very good and complex soft, but I think it will work in the same way. If there is no app listening in that port, there is no way to know if it is open or not.

Please, let me know if I was clear.

1

A port forward on the router cannot be tested from inside the LAN, you need to connect from the WAN (internet) side to see if a port forward is working or not.

Several internet sites offer services to check if a port is open:

What's My IP Port Scanner

GRC | ShieldsUP!

If you want to check with your own code, then you need to make sure the TCP/IP connection is rerouted via an external proxy or setup a tunnel. This has nothing to do with your code, it's basic networking 101.

0

For me, I needed something blocking until the connection to the port is available or after a certain amount of retries. So, I figured out this code:

public bool IsPortOpen(string host, int port, int timeout, int retry)
{
    var retryCount = 0;
    while (retryCount < retry)
    {
        if (retryCount > 0)
            Thread.Sleep(timeout);

        try
        {
            using (var client = new TcpClient())
            {
                var result = client.BeginConnect(host, port, null, null);
                var success = result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout);
                if (success)
                    return true;

                client.EndConnect(result);
            }
        }
        catch
        {
            // ignored
        }
        finally { retryCount++; }
    }

    return false;
}

Hope this helps!

0
public static bool PortInUse(int  port)
{
    bool inUse = false;

    IPGlobalProperties ipProperties = IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties();
    IPEndPoint [] ipEndPoints = ipProperties.GetActiveTcpListeners();


    foreach(IPEndPoint endPoint in ipEndPoints)
    {
        if(endPoint.Port == port)
        {
            inUse = true;
            break;
        }
    }


    return  inUse;
}
  • Please add a description of what your code does and what the difference between yours and the other answers is. – Hille Jun 19 at 11:05
-1
public string GetAvailablePort()
        {int startingPort=1000;
            string portnumberinformation = string.Empty;
            IPEndPoint[] endPoints;
            List<int> portArray = new List<int>();
            IPGlobalPr`enter code here`operties properties = IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties();`enter code here`


            //getting active tcp listners 
            endPoints = properties.GetActiveTcpListeners();
            portArray.AddRange(from n in endPoints
                               where n.Port >= startingPort
                               select n.Port);    

            portArray.Sort();

            for (int i = 0; i < portArray.Count; i++)
            {
                if (check condition)
                {
                    do somting
                }
            }

            return portnumberinformation;
        }
  • Please add a description of what your code does and what the difference between yours and the other answers is. – Hille Jun 19 at 11:05

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