In JavaScript, I've created an object like so:

var data = {
    'PropertyA': 1,
    'PropertyB': 2,
    'PropertyC': 3
};

Is it possible to add further properties to this object after it's initial creation if the properties name is not determined until run time? i.e.

var propName = 'Property' + someUserInput
//imagine someUserInput was 'Z', how can I now add a 'PropertyZ' property to 
//my object?

14 Answers 14

up vote 952 down vote accepted

Yes.

var data = {
    'PropertyA': 1,
    'PropertyB': 2,
    'PropertyC': 3
};

data["PropertyD"] = 4;

// dialog box with 4 in it
alert(data.PropertyD);
alert(data["PropertyD"]);

  • 55
    data.PropertyD = 4 would also work. – thedz Jul 26 '09 at 9:41
  • 112
    @thedz: data.PropertyD needs to know the property name, which isn't dynamic enough. – Georg Schölly Jul 26 '09 at 9:54
  • 6
    +1 because this helped me. But I don't understand why an object properties is handled like an array. – Ron van der Heijden Mar 5 '13 at 11:56
  • 8
    @Bondye: That's part of the strange design of javascript. In this case object["property"] is not exactly the same as array[4], the former wasn't created as a true array. – Georg Schölly Mar 5 '13 at 12:15
  • 13
    @Qantas: Let's say it doesn't answer it directly. But going from data["PropertyD"] to data[function_to_get_property_name()] seems trivial. – Georg Schölly Feb 24 '14 at 10:17

Yes it is possible. Assuming:

var data = {
    'PropertyA': 1,
    'PropertyB': 2,
    'PropertyC': 3
};
var propertyName = "someProperty";
var propertyValue = "someValue";

Either:

data[propertyName] = propertyValue;

or

eval("data." + propertyName + " = '" + propertyValue + "'");

The first method is preferred. eval() has the obvious security concerns if you're using values supplied by the user so don't use it if you can avoid it but it's worth knowing it exists and what it can do.

You can reference this with:

alert(data.someProperty);

or

data(data["someProperty"]);

or

alert(data[propertyName]);
  • 34
    Using eval is really dangerous. – Georg Schölly Jul 26 '09 at 9:29
  • 10
    Not to mention slow. – Eamon Nerbonne Jul 26 '09 at 11:46
  • 3
    JQuery Extend can also be used api.jquery.com/jQuery.extend – learnerplates Oct 18 '12 at 11:23
  • @GeorgSchölly True. – Obinna Nwakwue Aug 28 '16 at 14:47
  • 1
    Note (in case someone runs into the same issue as I did): For normal objects this works fine. But I had to add some property to a jQuery UI object to keep track of a list of items. In that case, the property was lost if added this way because jQuery always creates a copy. Here you need to use jQuery.extend(). – Matt Jul 7 '17 at 11:03

ES6 for the win!

const b = 'b';
const c = 'c';

const data = {
    a: true,
    [b]: true, // dynamic property
    [`interpolated-${c}`]: true, // dynamic property + interpolation
    [`${b}-${c}`]: true
}

If you log data you get this:

{
  a: true,
  b: true,
  interpolated-c: true,
  b-c: true
}

This makes use of the new dynamic property syntax + template literals.

  • A saver. Thanks – gnzg Dec 7 '17 at 18:00
  • 1
    This is what I needed in the case where I wanted my code to be completely functional (as in, no imperative statements saying obj[propname]). Instead, I was able to use this with object spread syntax. – intcreator Feb 13 at 5:41
  • 1
    It is not immediately obvious what this code snippet is doing to someone who hasn't seen or comprehended the new syntax. I would suggest an edit to display the output / expected properies with the 'a' const. – Alexander Pritchard Mar 20 at 16:47
  • Personally, I think the ES5 way is a lot cleaner and easier to understand: var a = {}; a["dynamic-" + prop] = true; – Jack Giffin Apr 3 at 16:39
  • @JackGiffin in some cases yes, but when working with immutable structures, this syntax can be very handy, since the approach you showed is mutating a. (Specially when using packages like redux) – Mauricio Soares Aug 10 at 9:35

I know that the question is answered perfectly, but I also found another way to add new properties and wanted to share it with you:

You can use the function Object.defineProperty()

Found on Mozilla Developer Network

Example:

var o = {}; // Creates a new object

// Example of an object property added with defineProperty with a data property descriptor
Object.defineProperty(o, "a", {value : 37,
                               writable : true,
                               enumerable : true,
                               configurable : true});
// 'a' property exists in the o object and its value is 37

// Example of an object property added with defineProperty with an accessor property descriptor
var bValue;
Object.defineProperty(o, "b", {get : function(){ return bValue; },
                               set : function(newValue){ bValue = newValue; },
                               enumerable : true,
                               configurable : true});
o.b = 38;
// 'b' property exists in the o object and its value is 38
// The value of o.b is now always identical to bValue, unless o.b is redefined

// You cannot try to mix both :
Object.defineProperty(o, "conflict", { value: 0x9f91102, 
                                       get: function() { return 0xdeadbeef; } });
// throws a TypeError: value appears only in data descriptors, get appears only in accessor descriptors
  • 4
    Pros and cons of this method? – Trevor Jan 14 '14 at 21:06
  • 5
    @Trevor: Total configurability and ability to add getters and setters; also, ability to add multiple properties at once with defineProperties (plural). – rvighne Aug 10 '14 at 1:08
  • @Thielicious Object.defineProperty isn’t meant to be the easy convenience tool, but the one with the fine-grained control. If you don’t need that additional control, it’s not the right tool to choose. – kleinfreund Sep 6 '17 at 9:00
  • Object.defineProperty(obj, prop, valueDescriptor) is a lot slower and harder for V8 to optimize than simply doing obj[prop] = value; – Jack Giffin Apr 3 at 16:37

Here, using your notation:

var data = {
    'PropertyA': 1,
    'PropertyB': 2,
    'PropertyC': 3
};
var propName = 'Property' + someUserInput
//imagine someUserInput was 'Z', how can I now add a 'PropertyZ' property to 
//my object?
data[propName] = 'Some New Property value'

You can add as many more properties as you like simply by using the dot notation:

var data = {
    var1:'somevalue'
}
data.newAttribute = 'newvalue'

or:

data[newattribute] = somevalue

for dynamic keys.

  • 2
    if the properties name is not determined until run time" - so that won't work unless you use eval, which isn't a good option – Marc Gravell Jul 26 '09 at 9:31
  • or use the [] syntax... data[somevar] = somevalue – Gabriel Hurley Jul 26 '09 at 9:35

in addition to all the previous answers, and in case you're wondering how we're going to write dynamic property names in the Future using Computed Property Names ( ECMAScript 6 ), here's how:

var person = "John Doe";
var personId = "person_" + new Date().getTime();
var personIndex = {
    [ personId ]: person
//  ^ computed property name
};

personIndex[ personId ]; // "John Doe"

reference: Understanding ECMAScript 6 - Nickolas Zakas

Just an addition to abeing's answer above. You can define a function to encapsulate the complexity of defineProperty as mentioned below.

var defineProp = function ( obj, key, value ){
  var config = {
    value: value,
    writable: true,
    enumerable: true,
    configurable: true
  };
  Object.defineProperty( obj, key, config );
};

//Call the method to add properties to any object
defineProp( data, "PropertyA",  1 );
defineProp( data, "PropertyB",  2 );
defineProp( data, "PropertyC",  3 );

reference: http://addyosmani.com/resources/essentialjsdesignpatterns/book/#constructorpatternjavascript

You can add properties dynamically using some of the options below:

In you example:

var data = {
    'PropertyA': 1,
    'PropertyB': 2,
    'PropertyC': 3
};

You can define a property with a dynamic value in the next two ways:

data.key = value;

or

data['key'] = value;

Even more..if your key is also dynamic you can define using the Object class with:

Object.defineProperty(data, key, withValue(value));

where data is your object, key is the variable to store the key name and value is the variable to store the value.

I hope this helps!

I know there are several answers to this post already, but I haven't seen one wherein there are multiple properties and they are within an array. And this solution by the way is for ES6.

For illustration, let's say we have an array named person with objects inside:

 let Person = [{id:1, Name: "John"}, {id:2, Name: "Susan"}, {id:3, Name: "Jet"}]

So, you can add a property with corresponding value. Let's say we want to add a Language with a default value of EN.

Person.map((obj)=>({...obj,['Language']:"EN"}))

The Person array now would become like this:

Person = [{id:1, Name: "John", Language:"EN"}, 
{id:2, Name: "Susan", Language:"EN"}, {id:3, Name: "Jet", Language:"EN"}]
  • You're not actually adding properties to an object, you're creating a new object with the old object's properties (via spread operator) and the new props as well. – Ed Orsi Nov 10 '17 at 20:22
  • 1
    You're right on that it should have been Person = Person.map(code here). But the point is you can add property to an existing object easily with ES6. – Edper Nov 10 '17 at 23:27

The simplest and most portable way is.

var varFieldName = "good";
var ob = {};
Object.defineProperty(ob, varFieldName , { value: "Fresh Value" });

Based on #abeing answer!

A nice way to access from dynamic string names that contain objects (for example object.subobject.property)

function ReadValue(varname)
{
    var v=varname.split(".");
    var o=window;
    if(!v.length)
        return undefined;
    for(var i=0;i<v.length-1;i++)
        o=o[v[i]];
    return o[v[v.length-1]];
}

function AssignValue(varname,value)
{
    var v=varname.split(".");
    var o=window;
    if(!v.length)
        return;
    for(var i=0;i<v.length-1;i++)
        o=o[v[i]];
    o[v[v.length-1]]=value;
}

Example:

ReadValue("object.subobject.property");
WriteValue("object.subobject.property",5);

eval works for read value, but write value is a bit harder.

A more advanced version (Create subclasses if they dont exists, and allows objects instead of global variables)

function ReadValue(varname,o=window)
{
    if(typeof(varname)==="undefined" || typeof(o)==="undefined" || o===null)
        return undefined;
    var v=varname.split(".");
    if(!v.length)
        return undefined;
    for(var i=0;i<v.length-1;i++)
    {
        if(o[v[i]]===null || typeof(o[v[i]])==="undefined") 
            o[v[i]]={};
        o=o[v[i]];
    }
    if(typeof(o[v[v.length-1]])==="undefined")    
        return undefined;
    else    
        return o[v[v.length-1]];
}

function AssignValue(varname,value,o=window)
{
    if(typeof(varname)==="undefined" || typeof(o)==="undefined" || o===null)
        return;
    var v=varname.split(".");
    if(!v.length)
        return;
    for(var i=0;i<v.length-1;i++)
    {
        if(o[v[i]]===null || typeof(o[v[i]])==="undefined")
            o[v[i]]={};
        o=o[v[i]];
    }
    o[v[v.length-1]]=value;
}

Example:

ReadValue("object.subobject.property",o);
WriteValue("object.subobject.property",5,o);

This is the same that o.object.subobject.property

  • 1
    exactly what I was looking for, this is useful for react this.setState({dynamic property: value }) thankyou! – Kevin Danikowski Apr 7 at 5:36

Here's how I solved the problem.

var obj = {

};
var field = "someouter.someinner.someValue";
var value = 123;

function _addField( obj, field, value )
{
    // split the field into tokens
    var tokens = field.split( '.' );

    // if there's more than one token, this field is an object
    if( tokens.length > 1 )
    {
        var subObj = tokens[0];

        // define the object
        if( obj[ subObj ] !== undefined ) obj[ subObj ] = {};

        // call addfield again on the embedded object
        var firstDot = field.indexOf( '.' );
        _addField( obj[ subObj ], field.substr( firstDot + 1 ), value );

    }
    else
    {
        // no embedded objects, just field assignment
        obj[ field ] = value;
    }
}

_addField( obj, field, value );
_addField(obj, 'simpleString', 'string');

console.log( JSON.stringify( obj, null, 2 ) );

Generates the following object:

{
  "someouter": {
    "someinner": {
      "someValue": 123
    }
  },
  "simpleString": "string"
}

Definitely. Think of it as a dictionary or associative array. You can add to it at any point.

  • 17
    I think we can assume an implicit "and if so, how?" in the question... – Marc Gravell Jul 26 '09 at 9:32
  • 1
    Just saying that will not help. – Obinna Nwakwue Aug 28 '16 at 14:51

protected by tchrist Sep 8 '12 at 15:05

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