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In the C# Language Specification Version 4, 1.6.7.5 Operators is information about List<T> operators: == and !=. But I can't find such operators defined in List<T>? Am I missing something?

Sample code from 1.6.7.5 Operators:

List<int> a = new List<int>();
a.Add(1);
a.Add(2);
List<int> b = new List<int>();
b.Add(1);
b.Add(2);
Console.WriteLine(a == b); // Outputs "True" => here I get False as well
b.Add(3);
Console.WriteLine(a == b); // Outputs "False"
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  • Please explain your question more clearly
    – darnir
    Aug 7, 2012 at 19:18
  • 6
    Please don't say "Outputs" for "I would like it to .." :)
    – user166390
    Aug 7, 2012 at 19:19
  • 8
    @pst This code is copied and pasted verbatim from the language spec, along with the comment. Aug 7, 2012 at 19:26

2 Answers 2

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List<T> is a reference type which does not overload operator==. Therefore, it uses the default reference equality semantics. You seem to be under the impression that it overrides operator== to provide value semantics, but it does not. a will equal b when a and b both refer to the same List<T> instance.

EDIT: So I looked at the spec myself. It says:

The List class declares two operators, operator == and operator !=, and thus gives new meaning to expressions that apply those operators to List instances. Specifically, the operators define equality of two List instances as comparing each of the contained objects using their Equals methods. The following example uses the == operator to compare two List instances.

Honestly... I have no clue what they're talking about, but this does not appear to be correct. As far as I can tell after running a few tests the List<T> class uses reference equality. Good question.

EDIT2: Decompiled List<T>, no operator== and/or operator!= overload. The spec appears to be completely incorrect in this case.

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  • 1
    The language spec says otherwise: "The List<T> class declares two operators, operator == and operator !=, and thus gives new meaning to expressions that apply those operators to List instances. Specifically, the operators define equality of two List<T> instances as comparing each of the contained objects using their Equals methods." Aug 7, 2012 at 19:22
  • @dasblinkenlight: You're right, I'm reading it now. Trying to make sense of it...
    – Ed S.
    Aug 7, 2012 at 19:22
  • @DanielDusek: Yes, I just added that to my post. It appears to be incorrect. Reality is not in line with the spec.
    – Ed S.
    Aug 7, 2012 at 19:25
  • @JamesMichaelHare: Same here (had to dig around for a working version of reflector...). It appears that the spec is simply wrong on this point.
    – Ed S.
    Aug 7, 2012 at 19:27
  • Yes, my thought is that the spec there was trying to illustrate and picked a bad example. That point of the spec, though, isn't intended to say that List<T> must support those operators, it was just a wrong example of one that supposedly does... Aug 7, 2012 at 19:30
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The spec is indeed correct, although confusing. The spec defines a class called List (poor naming choice).

The following table shows a generic class called List, which implements a growable list of objects. The class contains several examples of the most common kinds of function members.

This class can be seen in the spec at section 1.6.7. The Equals operator is overloaded and matches the output explained above. Perhaps a better name should have been chosen for that class.

static bool Equals(List<T> a, List<T> b) {
    if (a == null) return b == null;
    if (b == null || a.count != b.count) return false;
    for (int i = 0; i < a.count; i++) {
        if (!object.Equals(a.items[i], b.items[i])) {
            return false;
        }
    }
  return true;
}

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