6

In a project our team is using object lists to perform mass operations on sets of data that should all be processed in a similar way. In particular, different objects would ideally act the same, which would be very easily achieved with polymorphism. The problem I have with it is that inheritance implies the is a relationship, rather than the has a relationship. For example, several objects have a damage counter, but to make this easy to use in an object list, polymorphism could be used - except that would imply an is a relationship which wouldn't be true. (A person is not a damage counter.)

The only solution I can think of is to have a member of the class return the proper object type when implicitly casted instead of relying on inheritance. Would it be better to forgo the is a / has a ideal in exchange for ease of programming?

Edit: To be more specific, I am using C++, so using polymorphism would allow the different objects to "act the same" in the sense that the derived classes could reside within a single list and be operated upon by a virtual function of the base class. The use of an interface (or imitating them via inheritance) seems like a solution I would be willing to use.

10 Answers 10

5

I think you should be implementing interfaces to be able to enforce your has a relationships (am doing this in C#):

public interface IDamageable
{
    void AddDamage(int i);
    int DamageCount {get;}
}

You could implement this in your objects:

public class Person : IDamageable

public class House : IDamageable

And you'd be sure that the DamageCount property and has a method to allow you to add damage, without implying that a person and a house are related to each other in some sort of heirarchy.

3

This can be accomplished using multiple inheritance. In your specific case (C++), you can use pure virtual classes as interfaces. This allows you to have multiple inheritance without creating scope/ambiguity problems. Example:

class Damage {
    virtual void addDamage(int d) = 0;
    virtual int getDamage() = 0;
};

class Person : public virtual Damage {
    void addDamage(int d) {
        // ...
        damage += d * 2;
    }

    int getDamage() {
        return damage;
    }
};

class Car : public virtual Damage {
    void addDamage(int d) {
        // ...
        damage += d;
    }

    int getDamage() {
        return damage;
    }
};

Now both Person and Car 'is-a' Damage, meaning, they implement the Damage interface. The use of pure virtual classes (so that they are like interfaces) is key and should be used frequently. It insulates future changes from altering the entire system. Read up on the Open-Closed Principle for more information.

1

I agree with Jon, but assuming you still have need for a separate damage counter class, you can do:

class IDamageable {
  virtual DamageCounter* damage_counter() = 0;
};
class DamageCounter {
  ...
};

Each damageable class then needs to provide their own damage_counter() member function. The downside of this is that it creates a vtable for each damageable class. You can instead use:

class Damageable {
 public:
  DamageCounter damage_counter() { return damage_counter_; }
 private:
  DamageCounter damage_counter_;
};

But many people are Not Cool with multiple inheritance when multiple parents have member variables.

0

Sometimes it's worth giving up the ideal for the realistic. If it's going to cause a massive problem to "do it right" with no real benefit, then I would do it wrong. With that said, I often think it's worth taking the time to do it right, because unnecessary multiple inheritance increases complexity, and it can contribute to the system being less maintainable. You really have to decide what's best for your circumstance.

One option would be to have these objects implement a Damageable interface, rather than inheriting from DamageCounter. This way, a person has-a damage counter, but is damageable. (I often find interfaces make a lot more sense as adjective than nouns.) Then you could have a consistent damage interface on Damageable objects, and not expose that a damage counter is the underlying implementation (unless you need to).

If you want to go the template route (assuming C++ or similar), you could do this with mixins, but that can get ugly really quickly if done poorly.

0

This question is really confusing :/

Your question in bold is very open-ended and has an answer of "it depends", but your example doesn't really give much information about the context from which you are asking. These lines confuse me;

sets of data that should all be processed in a similar way

What way? Are the sets processed by a function? Another class? Via a virtual function on the data?

In particular, different objects would ideally act the same, which would be very easily achieved with polymorphism

The ideal of "acting the same" and polymorphism are absolutely unrelated. How does polymorphism make it easy to achieve?

0

@Kevin

Normally when we talk about 'is a' vs 'has a' we're talking about Inheritance vs Composition.

Um...damage counter would just be attribute of one of your derived classes and wouldn't really be discussed in terms of 'A person is a damage counter' with respect to your question.

Having the damage counter as an attribute doesn't allow him to diverse objects with damage counters into a collection. For example, a person and a car might both have damage counters, but you can't have a vector<Person|Car> or a vector<with::getDamage()> or anything similar in most languages. If you have a common Object base class, then you can shove them in that way, but then you can't access the getDamage() method generically.

That was the essence of his question, as I read it. "Should I violate is-a and has-a for the sake of treating certain objects as if they are the same, even though they aren't?"

0

Normally when we talk about 'is a' vs 'has a' we're talking about Inheritance vs Composition.

Um...damage counter would just be attribute of one of your derived classes and wouldn't really be discussed in terms of 'A person is a damage counter' with respect to your question.

See this:

http://www.artima.com/designtechniques/compoinh.html

Which might help you along the way.

@Derek: From the wording, I assumed there was a base clase, having re-read the question I kinda now see what he's getting at.

0

"Doing it right" will have benefits in the long run, if only because someone maintaining the system later will find it easier to comprehend if it was done right to begin with.

Depending on the language, you may well have the option of multiple inheritance, but normally simple interfaces make the most sense. By "simple" I mean make an interface that isn't trying to be too much. Better to have lots of simple interfaces and a few monolithic ones. Of course, there is always a trade off, and too many interfaces would probably lead to ones being "forgotten" about...

0

@Andrew

The ideal of "acting the same" and polymorphism are absolutely unrelated. How does polymorphism make it easy to achieve?

They all have, e.g., one function in common. Let's call it addDamage(). If you want to do something like this:

foreach (obj in mylist)
    obj.addDamage(1)

Then you need either a dynamic language, or you need them to extend from a common parent class (or interface). e.g.:

class Person : DamageCounter {}
class Car : DamageCounter {}

foreach (DamageCounter d in mylist)
    d.addDamage(1)

Then, you can treat Person and Car the same in certain very useful circumstances.

0

Polymorphism does not require inheritance. Polymorphism is what you get when multiple objects implement the same message signature (method).

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