11

This is an interview question:

Find the largest possible difference in an array of integers, such that the smaller integer occurs earlier in the array.

Constraint: Numbers are not unique. The range is Integer range of java. (or any other language)

Example:

input 1: {1, 100, 2, 105, -10, 30, 100}

The largest difference is between -10 and 100 -> 110 (here -10 is at the 5th index and 100 is at 7th index)

input 2: {1, 100, 2, 105, -10, 30, 80}

The largest difference is between 1 and 105 -> 104 (here 1 is at the 1st index and 105 is at 4th index)

Possible Solution:

One approach is check for all possible differences and keep a track of the biggest difference found till now O(n^2) complexity.

can this be done in better than O(n^2) time?

  • What are the restrictions, if any, in terms of extra space, complexity? – Edmon Aug 8 '12 at 6:40
  • For those interested, there is also an O(log n) solution for any subarray after O(n) precomputation with segment trees. Handy if you need to answer many queries about the same dataset. gist.github.com/elnygren/066c5387c7d102bf36a3993b37fad525 – elnygren Feb 23 '17 at 13:29

11 Answers 11

10

Start from the last element and move backwards. keep in memory the largest element occurred till now. for each element subtract from the max and store at the respective position.

Also, you can keep an element to store the max difference and give the output straight away. O(n) time, O(1) space.

int max = INT_MIN;
int maxdiff = 0;

for (i = sizeof(arr) / sizeof(int) - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
  if (max < arr[i]) {
    max = arr[i];
  }
  int diff = max - arr[i];
  if (maxdiff < diff) {
    maxdiff = diff;
  }
}

print maxdiff;
  • i have not given the code that you can copy paste and run, i have given the logic. you can implement in any language. although its biased towards cpp. see, it keeps track of the biggest number so far( from the last) and finds the difference with each, dynamically updating the max(if it finds bigger max). and also it keeps track of the biggest difference. – Dhandeep Jain Aug 8 '12 at 7:40
  • My bad - good solution, +1 – alfasin Aug 8 '12 at 7:54
  • 1
    I fixed your loop to be i-- instead of i++ - I hope you don't mind. – Aleks G Aug 8 '12 at 11:55
  • @DhandeepJain your logic does not work for the case when the seed array contains numbers in descending order. For ex: if seed is {4,3,2,1} it will return 0 instead of -1. I have suggested an edit to the answer that takes care of this scenario; please have a look and accept the change if it seems fine. – shridharama Jan 26 '15 at 3:21
  • @shridharama The question says "such that smaller number occurs earlier in the array". The array {4,3,2,1} violates this. – sreeprasad May 3 '15 at 1:57
11

Dhandeep's algoritm is good and Vivek's translation of the code to Java works! Also, we can also scan the array normally and not in reverse:

int seed[] = {1, 100, 2, 105, -10, 30, 100};
int maxDiff=Integer.MIN_VALUE, minNumber = Integer.MAX_VALUE;

for (int i = 0; i < seed.length ; i++){
    if(minNumber > seed[i]) 
       minNumber = seed[i];

    maxDiff = Math.max(maxDiff, (seed[i]-minNumber));
}
System.out.println(maxDiff);
  • 2
    above solutions are correct but this is more intuitive, so +1. thanks. – Trying Jul 20 '13 at 2:12
  • @alfasin your code does not work for the case when the seed array contains numbers in descending order. For ex: if seed is {4,3,2,1} it will return 0 instead of -1. I have suggested an edit to the answer that takes care of this scenario; please have a look and accept the change if it seems fine. – shridharama Jan 26 '15 at 3:13
  • @shridharama the definition does not include how such a case should be treated. Returning 0 is as good as returning -1. – alfasin Jan 26 '15 at 4:41
4

Thanks @Dhandeep Jain for the answer. There is the java version:

//int seed[] = {1, 100, 2, 105, -10, 30, 100};
        int seed[] = {1, 100, 2, 105, -10, 30, 80};
        int maxDiff=Integer.MIN_VALUE, maxNumber = Integer.MIN_VALUE;

        for (int i = (seed.length-1); i >=0 ; i--){
            if(maxNumber < seed[i]) 
                maxNumber = seed[i];

            maxDiff = Math.max(maxDiff, (maxNumber - seed[i]));
        }
        System.out.println(maxDiff);
  • This code prints "0"... – alfasin Aug 8 '12 at 6:54
  • @alfasin No it doesn't. Can you try with SOPs ? – Vivek Aug 8 '12 at 7:38
  • +1 You're right - my bad, nice solution in O(n) – alfasin Aug 8 '12 at 7:53
0

I propose that the largest difference is always between the largest number and the smallest number before that or between the smallest number and the largest number after that. These can be determined in linear time.

0
public class Test{

    public static void main(String[] args){

        int arr1[] = {1,2,5,7,9};
        int arr2[] = {20,25,26,35};
        int diff = 0;
        int max = 0;

        for(int i=0;i<arr1.length;i++){
            for(int j=0;j<arr2.length;j++){

                diff =  Math.abs(arr1[i]-arr2[j]);
                if(diff > max){
                    max = diff;
                }
            }
        }
    System.out.println(max);
    }   
}
  • How does this answer can this be done in better than O(n^2) time ? How does it differ from check for all possible differences and keep a track of the biggest difference found till now? – greybeard Nov 4 '16 at 7:50
0
    // Solution Complexity : O(n)   
    int maxDiff(int a[], int n){
        //  Find difference of adjacent elements
        int diff[n+1];
        for (int i=0; i < n-1; i++)
            diff[i] = a[i+1] - a[i];

        // Now find the maximum sum sub array in diff array
        int max_diff = diff[0];
        for (int i = 1 ; i < n-1 ; i++ ) {
            if( diff[i-1] > 0 ) diff[i] += diff[i-1];
            if( max_diff < diff[i] ) max_diff = diff[i];
        }
        return max_diff;
    }
  • Is there missing something in the code listing, there is a lone } at the end. – isaias-b Sep 29 '15 at 19:26
  • 0 1 1 2 ........ – greybeard Sep 30 '15 at 9:14
0

First find the difference between the adjacent elements of the array and store all differences in an auxiliary array diff[] of size n-1. Now this problems turns into finding the maximum sum subarray of this difference array.

0

Ruby solution:

a = [3, 6, 8, 1, 5]
min = 10**6
max_diff = -10**6
a.each do |x|
  min = x if x < min
  diff = x - min
  max_diff = diff if diff > max_diff
end
puts max_diff
-1
public static void findDifference(Integer arr[]) {
    int indexStart = 0;
    int indexMin = 0;
    int indexEnd = 1;
    int min = arr[0];
    int diff = arr[1] - arr[0];
    for (int counter = 1; counter < arr.length; counter++) {
        if (arr[counter] - min > diff) {
            diff = arr[counter] - min;
            indexEnd = counter;
            indexStart = indexMin;
        }
        if (arr[counter] < min) {
            min = arr[counter];
            indexMin = counter;
        }
    }
    System.out.println("indexStart = " + indexStart);
    System.out.println("indexEnd = " + indexEnd);
    System.out.println("diff = " + diff);
}
-1
public static void findlargestDifference(int arr[]){

    int max_diff=0;     
    int min_value=Integer.MIN_VALUE;        
    for(int i=0;i<arr.length;i++){

        if(min_value<arr[i]){               
            min_value=arr[i];               
        }           
        int diff=min_value-arr[i];

        if(max_diff<diff){
            max_diff=diff;
        }                   
    }       
    System.out.println("Max Difference is  "+ max_diff);    
}
-2

I'm pretty sure this should solve your problem:

    int largestNumber = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
    int smallestNumber = Integer.MAX_VALUE; 

    for(int i = 0; i < yourArray.Length; i++)
    {
        if(yourArray[i] > largestNumber)
            largestNumber = yourArray[i];

        if(yourArray[i] < smallestNumber)
            smallestNumber = yourArray[i];

    }

    int biggestDifference = largestNumber - smallestNumber ;
  • 2
    This does not account for the smaller occurring earlier – dvberkel Aug 8 '12 at 6:35
  • you are missing the "such that the smaller integer occurs earlier in the array." part of the question. – Vivek Aug 8 '12 at 6:36
  • Oh sorry, I cant believe I didn't see that. I was on my phone and I must have scrolled over it. :/ – user1582511 Aug 8 '12 at 19:51

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