131

I've seen many times the following syntax which defines a column in a create/alter DDL statement:

ALTER TABLE tbl ADD COLUMN col VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT "MyDefault"

The question is: since a default value is specified, is it necessary to also specify that the column should not accept NULLs? In other words, doesn't DEFAULT render NOT NULL redundant?

7 Answers 7

171

DEFAULT is the value that will be inserted in the absence of an explicit value in an insert / update statement. Lets assume, your DDL did not have the NOT NULL constraint:

ALTER TABLE tbl ADD COLUMN col VARCHAR(20) DEFAULT 'MyDefault'

Then you could issue these statements

-- 1. This will insert 'MyDefault' into tbl.col
INSERT INTO tbl (A, B) VALUES (NULL, NULL);

-- 2. This will insert 'MyDefault' into tbl.col
INSERT INTO tbl (A, B, col) VALUES (NULL, NULL, DEFAULT);

-- 3. This will insert 'MyDefault' into tbl.col
INSERT INTO tbl (A, B, col) DEFAULT VALUES;

-- 4. This will insert NULL into tbl.col
INSERT INTO tbl (A, B, col) VALUES (NULL, NULL, NULL);

Alternatively, you can also use DEFAULT in UPDATE statements, according to the SQL-1992 standard:

-- 5. This will update 'MyDefault' into tbl.col
UPDATE tbl SET col = DEFAULT;

-- 6. This will update NULL into tbl.col
UPDATE tbl SET col = NULL;

Note, not all databases support all of these SQL standard syntaxes. Adding the NOT NULL constraint will cause an error with statements 4, 6, while 1-3, 5 are still valid statements. So to answer your question: No, they're not redundant.

4
  • I went to your link (to your blog post) expecting to see an explanation (possibly with some numbers) of the tremendous impact on query performance, but only saw it briefly restated that it has an impact. No offense, but the link is a little misleading. Aug 20, 2019 at 14:10
  • @SethFlowers: Thanks for the pointer, Seth. The linked article got edited in the meantime. I'll see if I can link something else instead, or remove the link. As it is now, you're absolutely right, it does not add any value to the answer here.
    – Lukas Eder
    Aug 20, 2019 at 21:15
  • Thanks - I hope I didn't sound rude. I just saw the link and was like "yeah, that's definitely something I want to read" - then was a little let down :). Aug 21, 2019 at 12:47
  • @SethFlowers: No worries. I completely agree. To my rescue: My blogging skills vastly improved over the past years :)
    – Lukas Eder
    Aug 21, 2019 at 12:57
29

Even with a default value, you can always override the column data with null.

The NOT NULL restriction won't let you update that row after it was created with null value

1
  • 2
    I think this should be rephrased: "The NOT NULL restriction won't let you update that row after it was created with null value" Of course rows with NOT NULL columns can be updated, they just can't be updated with null as a value for that column. Furthermore: I assume that creating a row means inserting a row. INSERT statements cannot have null values for columns that are specified with NOT NULL either.
    – makrom
    Jun 20, 2017 at 8:29
5

My SQL teacher said that if you specify both a DEFAULT value and NOT NULLor NULL, DEFAULT should always be expressed before NOT NULL or NULL.

Like this:

ALTER TABLE tbl ADD COLUMN col VARCHAR(20) DEFAULT "MyDefault" NOT NULL

ALTER TABLE tbl ADD COLUMN col VARCHAR(20) DEFAULT "MyDefault" NULL

4
  • 5
    Hey there, and thanks for participating. This doesn't address the question at hand, though, and the both orderings are completely effective. I find it easier to put default at the end when I'm manually scripting tables because then the NULL and NOT NULL values align better.
    – emragins
    May 17, 2017 at 17:02
  • 1
    Okay, I guess you're right too. I don't get why my course says explicitely what I wrote on my answer. I know that my answer doesn't really address the question, but I found that a comment would be not very readable. May 18, 2017 at 10:50
  • 3
    There's a difference between (subjective) best practice and rules. It's not a bad idea to have a consistent style, but in this particular case, I would personally prefer NOT NULL before DEFAULT. Regardless, you can also write comments instead of answers, this would have been more appropriate.
    – makrom
    Jun 20, 2017 at 8:35
  • That probably does not answer the question. But that is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you. Oct 23, 2020 at 7:41
3

I would say not.

If the column does accept null values, then there's nothing to stop you inserting a null value into the field. As far as I'm aware, the default value only applies on creation of a new row.

With not null set, then you can't insert a null value into the field as it'll throw an error.

Think of it as a fail safe mechanism to prevent nulls.

4
  • 2
    You said 'creation of a new rule'. Did you intend to say 'creation of a new row'?
    – bielawski
    May 18, 2018 at 18:38
  • I think that is a more practical answer of this question. Apr 3, 2020 at 20:01
  • @bielawski And nearly 8 years later, I get around to correcting that typo :)
    – Dark Hippo
    Apr 4, 2020 at 7:47
  • This should be the acepted answer. OP asks for a simple question and the answer is simply "no". Explanation and example is needed for documentation though. Aug 2, 2020 at 0:11
2

In other words, doesn't DEFAULT render NOT NULL redundant ?

No, it is not redundant. To extended accepted answer. For column col which is nullable awe can insert NULL even when DEFAULT is defined:

CREATE TABLE t(id INT PRIMARY KEY, col INT DEFAULT 10);

-- we just inserted NULL into column with DEFAULT
INSERT INTO t(id, col) VALUES(1, NULL);

+-----+------+
| ID  | COL  |
+-----+------+
|   1 | null |
+-----+------+

Oracle introduced additional syntax for such scenario to overide explicit NULL with default DEFAULT ON NULL:

CREATE TABLE t2(id INT PRIMARY KEY, col INT DEFAULT ON NULL 10);
-- same as
--CREATE TABLE t2(id INT PRIMARY KEY, col INT DEFAULT ON NULL 10 NOT NULL); 

INSERT INTO t2(id, col) VALUES(1, NULL);

+-----+-----+
| ID  | COL |
+-----+-----+
|  1  |  10 |
+-----+-----+

Here we tried to insert NULL but get default instead.

db<>fiddle demo

ON NULL

If you specify the ON NULL clause, then Oracle Database assigns the DEFAULT column value when a subsequent INSERT statement attempts to assign a value that evaluates to NULL.

When you specify ON NULL, the NOT NULL constraint and NOT DEFERRABLE constraint state are implicitly specified.

0

In case of Oracle since 12c you have DEFAULT ON NULL which implies a NOT NULL constraint.

ALTER TABLE tbl ADD (col VARCHAR(20) DEFAULT ON NULL 'MyDefault');

ALTER TABLE

ON NULL

If you specify the ON NULL clause, then Oracle Database assigns the DEFAULT column value when a subsequent INSERT statement attempts to assign a value that evaluates to NULL.

When you specify ON NULL, the NOT NULL constraint and NOT DEFERRABLE constraint state are implicitly specified. If you specify an inline constraint that conflicts with NOT NULL and NOT DEFERRABLE, then an error is raised.

0

In other words, doesn't DEFAULT render NOT NULL redundant?

No, they are not.

NOT NULL just means you cannot insert NULL to that column, and DEFAULT enables you insert data without specify value to the field which decorated by DEFAULT.


e.g., there is a table:

CREATE TABLE `test_table` (
    `id` int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `age` int,
    `name` VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
);

You probably think that NOT NULL will prevent you from doing this like below:

insert into test_table (age) value (10);

Yes, there will be an error but not because NOT NULL, in this case, MySQL will complain because you didn't set DEFAULT to name field: Field 'name' doesn't have a default value.

If you do this like below:

insert into test_table (age, name) value (10, NULL);

The mysql will give you an error Column 'name' cannot be null, this is what NOT NULL "does" for us.

So, NOT NULL just prevent you from inserting NULL value to that field, whereas DEFAULT allows you insert data without specifying the value of a specific field, they are different.

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