1

Suppose you attempt to do the following:

template</* args */>
typename std::enable_if< /*conditional*/ , /*type*/ >::type
static auto hope( /*args*/) -> decltype( /*return expr*/ )
{
}

Is it possible to combine conditional inclusion/overloading (std::enable_if) with trailing-return-type (auto ... -> decltype())?

I would not be interesting in solutions using the preprocessor. I can always do things like

#define RET(t) --> decltype(t) { return t; }

and extend it to take also the whole conditional. Instead I am interested if the language supports it without using another trait for the return type, i.e. ReturnType<A,B>::type_t or whatever is used in the function body.

2 Answers 2

10

The trailing-return-type isn't much different from the normal return type, except that it's specified after the parameter list and cv-/ref-qualifiers. Also, it doesn't necessarily need decltype, a normal type is fine too:

auto answer() -> int{ return 42; }

So by now you should see what the answer to your question is:

template<class T>
using Apply = typename T::type; // I don't like to spell this out

template</* args */>
static auto hope( /*args*/)
    -> Apply<std::enable_if</* condition */, decltype( /*return expr*/ )>>
{
}

Though I personally prefer using just decltype and expression SFINAE, as long as the condition can be expressed as an expression (e.g., can you invoke a function on an object of a certain type):

template<class T>
static auto hope(T const& arg)
  -> decltype(arg.foo(), void())
{
  // ...
}
5
  • Great! Thanks! So, your second case would not support a conditional std::is_base_of<>::value, right? In this case, one would go for the first case.
    – ritter
    Aug 8, 2012 at 14:35
  • 1
    @Frank: Yeah, is_base_of is rather complicated to easily test. You can easily check if a certain type is convertible to another type (decltype(T2(obj_of_T1)) for explicit conversion), but you can't determine if the class just has a conversion operator / ctor or if it's a base class, that needs some additional blackbox magic (or compiler support).
    – Xeo
    Aug 8, 2012 at 14:38
  • 1
    Uhm... too lazy to look it up, but I don't think you can use enable_if on a non-templated function (even if it is a member of a template). Aug 8, 2012 at 14:58
  • @David: Yeah, I'll add that and add the templates tag to the question; SFINAE never goes without templates after all.
    – Xeo
    Aug 8, 2012 at 15:44
  • @KennyTM: void(), X(answer); // force ctor call. ;)
    – Xeo
    Aug 8, 2012 at 19:19
2

I can only assume that your original pseudo code is a function template, or otherwise SFINAE would not work altogether. Now if it is a template function, you can use an extra template argument that is defaulted and use SFINAE on that argument:

template <typename T, typename _ = typename std::enable_if< trait<T>::value >::type >
static auto function( T arg ) -> decltype( expression ) {
   // ...
}

I prefer this as it limits the use of SFINAE to the template clause and leaves a cleaner function signature. This is one of my favorite under-the-radar new features of C++11.

2

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