391

I have a script named test1.py which is not in a module. It just has code that should execute when the script itself is run. There are no functions, classes, methods, etc. I have another script which runs as a service. I want to call test1.py from the script running as a service.

For example:

File test1.py:

print "I am a test"
print "see! I do nothing productive."

File service.py:

# Lots of stuff here
test1.py # do whatever is in test1.py

I'm aware of one method which is opening the file, reading the contents, and basically evaluating it. I'm assuming there's a better way of doing this. Or at least I hope so.

3

14 Answers 14

331

The usual way to do this is something like the following.

test1.py

def some_func():
    print 'in test 1, unproductive'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    # test1.py executed as script
    # do something
    some_func()

service.py

import test1

def service_func():
    print 'service func'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    # service.py executed as script
    # do something
    service_func()
    test1.some_func()
6
  • 56
    What if test1.py is located in some far-away directory? Jun 8 '14 at 5:46
  • 5
    @EvgeniSergeev See stackoverflow.com/questions/67631/… Jun 8 '14 at 6:27
  • 42
    This doesn't really answer the question though, does it? You aren't executing the whole script, you're executing some functions from within the script that you import.
    – gented
    Mar 22 '17 at 10:36
  • 7
    @GennaroTedesco: You're mistaken. The import test1 in service.py does indeed execute the whole script (which only defines some_func() since __name__ == '__main__' will be False in that case). That sounds like all the OP wants to do. This answer goes beyond that, but definitely does answer the question—and then some.
    – martineau
    Nov 6 '17 at 17:15
  • 4
    If, say, test1.py didn't contain the definition of the function some_func() (but rather just some lines of code, for instance print("hello")) then your code wouldn't work. In this particular example it does work because you're essentially importing an external function that you are afterwards calling back.
    – gented
    Nov 6 '17 at 20:29
186

This is possible in Python 2 using

execfile("test2.py")

See the documentation for the handling of namespaces, if important in your case.

In Python 3, this is possible using (thanks to @fantastory)

exec(open("test2.py").read())

However, you should consider using a different approach; your idea (from what I can see) doesn't look very clean.

8
  • 9
    directly what i need in python 32 it is exec(open('test2.py').read())
    – fantastory
    Mar 16 '12 at 10:43
  • 10
    This approach executes the scripts within the calling namespace. :)
    – dmvianna
    Oct 21 '13 at 5:46
  • 8
    to pass command-line arguments to the script, you could edit sys.argv list.
    – jfs
    Jan 13 '15 at 18:09
  • 1
    More comprehensive treatment on Python 3 equivalents: stackoverflow.com/questions/436198/…
    – John Y
    Aug 4 '16 at 15:38
  • 4
    This does not accept arguments (to be passed to the PY file)!
    – Apostolos
    Sep 13 '18 at 10:43
96

Another way:

File test1.py:

print "test1.py"

File service.py:

import subprocess

subprocess.call("test1.py", shell=True)

The advantage to this method is that you don't have to edit an existing Python script to put all its code into a subroutine.

Documentation: Python 2, Python 3

11
  • 8
    I had to use subprocess.call("./test1.py", shell=True) to make it work
    – asmaier
    Apr 17 '13 at 9:45
  • 6
    Do not use shell=True unless it's necessary. Nov 3 '13 at 10:58
  • 9
    It won't work on a typical Unix where the current directory is not in PATH. test1.py should be executable and have the shebang line (#!/usr/bin/env python) and you should specify the full path or you need to provide the executable yourself: call([sys.executable, os.path.join(get_script_dir(), 'test1.py')]) where get_script_dir() is defined here.
    – jfs
    Jan 13 '15 at 18:14
  • 8
    Or subprocess.call(['python', 'test1.py']). Mar 6 '18 at 16:06
  • 3
    @NitishKumarPal No; as already pointed out in earlier comments, you should avoid shell=True when you can. There is no shell functionality here so subprocess.call(['python', 'test1.py']) is definitely better, though you should probably use check_call or run instead (or not run Python as a subprocess of Python). See also stackoverflow.com/questions/3172470/…
    – tripleee
    Sep 4 '19 at 7:46
27
import os

os.system("python myOtherScript.py arg1 arg2 arg3")  

Using os you can make calls directly to your terminal. If you want to be even more specific you can concatenate your input string with local variables, ie.

command = 'python myOtherScript.py ' + sys.argv[1] + ' ' + sys.argv[2]
os.system(command)
2
  • calls to os.system should be avoided, you can do the same with any Class from Popen, Call, Jan 5 '18 at 4:45
  • 1
    From the Python documentation: The subprocess module provides more powerful facilities for spawning new processes and retrieving their results; using that module is preferable to using this function. Mar 6 '18 at 15:48
25

If you want test1.py to remain executable with the same functionality as when it's called inside service.py, then do something like:

test1.py

def main():
    print "I am a test"
    print "see! I do nothing productive."

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

service.py

import test1
# lots of stuff here
test1.main() # do whatever is in test1.py
2
  • 7
    What if you have runtime parameters? Jun 17 '18 at 20:00
  • sys.argv can still be used here. And you can def main(*args), as needed Aug 17 at 18:46
15

I prefer runpy:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# coding: utf-8

import runpy

runpy.run_path(path_name='script-01.py')
runpy.run_path(path_name='script-02.py')
runpy.run_path(path_name='script-03.py')

1
13

You should not be doing this. Instead, do:

test1.py:

 def print_test():
      print "I am a test"
      print "see! I do nothing productive."

service.py

#near the top
from test1 import print_test
#lots of stuff here
print_test()
1
  • 4
    when you import test1 how does it know where the file is? does it have to be in the same directory? what if its not?
    – NULL.Dude
    Apr 3 '18 at 19:50
10

Use import test1 for the 1st use - it will execute the script. For later invocations, treat the script as an imported module, and call the reload(test1) method.

When reload(module) is executed:

  • Python modules’ code is recompiled and the module-level code reexecuted, defining a new set of objects which are bound to names in the module’s dictionary. The init function of extension modules is not called

A simple check of sys.modules can be used to invoke the appropriate action. To keep referring to the script name as a string ('test1'), use the 'import()' builtin.

import sys
if sys.modules.has_key['test1']:
    reload(sys.modules['test1'])
else:
    __import__('test1')
2
  • 3
    reload is gone in Python 3. Nov 3 '13 at 10:59
  • 3
    importing a module is not equivalent to running it e.g., consider if __name__ == "__main__": guard. There could be other more subtle differences. Don't leave arbitrary code at the global level. Put it in a function and call it after the import as suggested in the accepted answer instead
    – jfs
    Jan 13 '15 at 18:18
4

Why not just import test1? Every python script is a module. A better way would be to have a function e.g. main/run in test1.py, import test1 and run test1.main(). Or you can execute test1.py as a subprocess.

1
  • Let's say I use import test1 because I want .py to compile to .pyc for next time. How do I pass my parameters to it? Will I main() function be run automatically or do I have to do something special in it? Apr 28 at 23:08
4

As it's already mentioned, runpy is a nice way to run other scripts or modules from current script.

By the way, it's quite common for a tracer or debugger to do this, and under such circumstances methods like importing the file directly or running the file in a subprocess usually do not work.

It also needs attention to use exec to run the code. You have to provide proper run_globals to avoid import error or some other issues. Refer to runpy._run_code for details.

2

This process is somewhat un-orthodox, but would work across all python versions,

Suppose you want to execute a script named 'recommend.py' inside an 'if' condition, then use,

if condition:
       import recommend

The technique is different, but works!

0

This is an example with subprocess library:

import subprocess

python_version = '3'
path_to_run = './'
py_name = '__main__.py'

# args = [f"python{python_version}", f"{path_to_run}{py_name}"]  # Avaible in python3
args = ["python{}".format(python_version), "{}{}".format(path_to_run, py_name)]

res = subprocess.Popen(args, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
output, error_ = res.communicate()

if not error_:
    print(output)
else:
    print(error_)
1
  • 1
    Running Python as a subprocess of Python is almost never the correct solution. If you do go with a subprocess, you should avoid Popen unless the higher-level functions really cannot do what you want. In this case, check_call or run would do everything you need and more, with substantially less plumbing in your own code.
    – tripleee
    Sep 4 '19 at 7:44
0

Add this to your python script.

import os
os.system("exec /path/to/another/script")

This executes that command as if it were typed into the shell.

0

An example to do it using subprocess.

from subprocess import run

import sys

run([sys.executable, 'fullpathofyourfile.py'])

1
  • 1
    What does this add to the existing answers? Specifically, Python3 should use call, not run Aug 17 at 18:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.