7

In Spring MVC 3.x I can configure a ContentNegotiatingViewResolver bean to automatically render any given endpoint in either JSON or XML simply by changing the file extension to .json or .xml. I assumed there was an equivalent functionality in Grails but I can't find it.

Everything I've read says I have to catch the incoming mime-type (using withFormat) and then specify the JSON output using render as JSON (or equivalent) in every one of my controller methods (e.g. rendering JSON with Grails?). Before I dive in and start adding JSON-specific code to my controllers I thought I'd ask here...

So my question is: Can I configure Grails 2 to automatically produce JSON output by simply adding a `.json' file extension (or changing the accept header) for any given URL?

1
  • 1
    If you are still using scaffolding, you can just add it to the scaffolding and it will apply to all your controllers.
    – cdeszaq
    Commented Aug 9, 2012 at 13:20

3 Answers 3

7

I think you can easly to it using a grails filter

This is a filter I have done ab OAuth API in a mine application, it do xml,json and yalm based on accept headers

class RenderFilters {

    def grailsApplication

    def filters = {

        multiFormat(controller: '*EndPoint', action: '*', search: true) {

            after = { Map model ->

                def accepts = request.getHeaders('accept')*.toLowerCase()

                def out = model.containsKey('out')?model.out:model

                if(accepts.any{ it.contains('json')  }){
                    render(text: out as JSON, contentType: 'application/json', encoding:"UTF-8")
                }

                else if(accepts.any{ it.contains('yaml')  }){
                    render(text: Yaml.dump(out), contentType: 'application/x-yaml;', encoding:"UTF-8")
                }

                else if(accepts.any{ it.contains('html')  }){
                    render(text: out as JSON, contentType: 'application/json', encoding:"UTF-8")
                }

                else if(accepts.any{ it.contains('xml')  }){
                    render(text: out as XML, contentType: 'application/xml', encoding:"UTF-8")
                }

                else {
                    render(text: out as JSON, contentType: 'application/json', encoding:"UTF-8")
                }
                false
            }

            before = {

                def contentType = request.getHeader('Content-Type')?.toLowerCase()

                if(!contentType) return true

                if(contentType == 'application/json'){
                    params.body = JSON.parse(request.reader)                    
                    }
                if(contentType == 'application/xml'){
                    params.body = XML.parse(request.reader)
                    }
                if(contentType == 'application/x-yaml'){
                    params.body = Yaml.load(request.reader)
                    }

                params.body = new TypeConvertingMap((Map) params.body)              

                true
                }

        }

    }
}
1
  • This looks like the way to go. I'll give it try on Monday before accepting as correct. It even has the advantage of allowing me to add a JSONP callback wrapper!
    – nickdos
    Commented Aug 11, 2012 at 5:55
3

For anyone coming across this SO question, I thought I'd include my final Grails (version 2.x) filter code, as it did differ from that in Fabiano's answer (above).

The following filter allows plain HTML content to be handled as normal by Grails and uses the Grails content negotiation mechanism to set the response.format by file extension or accept header (depending on the conf settings: grails.mime.use.accept.header & grails.mime.file.extensions). I also added support for a JSONP callback wrapper.

import grails.converters.JSON
import grails.converters.XML

class RenderFilters {

    def filters = {
        multiFormat(controller: '*', action: '*', find: true) {
            after = { Map model ->
                def out = model?.containsKey('out')?model.out:model

                if (response.format == "json" && params.callback) {
                    render(text: params.callback + "(${out as JSON})" , contentType: 'application/javascript', encoding:"UTF-8")
                    false
                } else if (response.format == "json") {
                    render(text: out as JSON, contentType: 'application/json', encoding:"UTF-8")
                    false
                } else if (response.format == "xml") {
                    render(text: out as XML, contentType: 'application/xml', encoding:"UTF-8")
                    false
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
2

By accident, I discovered that the latest grails does output JSON and XML automatically by simply setting the Accept header on the query!

I'm using 2.3.2 at the moment but probably the same works for earlier versions and I simply created a new app, created a new simple domain class with some properties, ran generate-all and then run-app. After running it, the curl -i -H "Accept: application/json" returns JSON and curl -i -H "Accept: application/xml" returns XML without any additional work.

I was so surprised with this, that to ensure I haven't installed something strange on my local machine, I tried it on a brand new server with a new grails installation ... and it works!!!

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