92

Is there a way to terminate a process started with os.exec in Golang? For example (from http://golang.org/pkg/os/exec/#example_Cmd_Start),

cmd := exec.Command("sleep", "5")
err := cmd.Start()
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}
log.Printf("Waiting for command to finish...")
err = cmd.Wait()
log.Printf("Command finished with error: %v", err)

Is there a way to terminate that process ahead of time, perhaps after 3 seconds?

4 Answers 4

166

Run and terminate an exec.Process:

// Start a process:
cmd := exec.Command("sleep", "5")
if err := cmd.Start(); err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}

// Kill it:
if err := cmd.Process.Kill(); err != nil {
    log.Fatal("failed to kill process: ", err)
}

Run and terminate an exec.Process after a timeout:

ctx, cancel := context.WithTimeout(context.Background(), 3 * time.Second)
defer cancel()

if err := exec.CommandContext(ctx, "sleep", "5").Run(); err != nil {
    // This will fail after 3 seconds. The 5 second sleep
    // will be interrupted.
}

See this example in the Go docs


Legacy

Before Go 1.7, we didn't have the context package and this answer was different.

Run and terminate an exec.Process after a timeout using channels and a goroutine:

// Start a process:
cmd := exec.Command("sleep", "5")
if err := cmd.Start(); err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}

// Wait for the process to finish or kill it after a timeout (whichever happens first):
done := make(chan error, 1)
go func() {
    done <- cmd.Wait()
}()
select {
case <-time.After(3 * time.Second):
    if err := cmd.Process.Kill(); err != nil {
        log.Fatal("failed to kill process: ", err)
    }
    log.Println("process killed as timeout reached")
case err := <-done:
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatalf("process finished with error = %v", err)
    }
    log.Print("process finished successfully")
}

Either the process ends and its error (if any) is received through done or 3 seconds have passed and the program is killed before it's finished.

22
  • 8
    Note: after killing the Process, Wait() will return. You should do a pull from done after err := cmd.Process.Kill() to prevent memory leaks. Aug 9, 2012 at 15:35
  • 3
    @RhythmicFistman it would cause the goroutine to hang until the end of the program trying to send to done when no one was receiving it. An even better method would be to change the first line to done := make(chan error, 1). This would allow the send to succeed immediately and the goroutine to exit without a pull on done. Oct 15, 2013 at 15:07
  • 1
    @CharlieParker, that ensures that one send to the channel will always succeed immediately and the sender can move on or, in this case, exit. If not, then it will wait for someone to receive. If no one ever does, it will wait forever and hold the memory. Jul 17, 2014 at 20:17
  • 1
    @KamilDziedzic, the purpose of the write to done is to ensure the program has quit (wait returned) before continuing with the program. Under no circumstance can the program continue to run after that select statement. If you do a non-blocking write, that won't be guarenteed. Aug 13, 2014 at 16:01
  • 1
    @StephenWeinberg I don't get it. It waits exactly like the original code on cmd.Wait(), and writing to done might only fail when a) it has full buffer (which it has after sending first value) b) nothing is waiting to receive... and actually this means that probably goroutine might try to send to done before main goroutine will be ready to receive... so, yes, buffered chan is required. play.golang.org/p/Mx2gh9zMji But I still don't get why you say it wouldn't wait for cmd to finish Aug 13, 2014 at 18:31
27

The other answers are right about calling Kill(), but the parts regarding killing the process after a timeout are little outdated now.

This can be done now with the context package and exec.CommandContext (example adapted from the example in the docs):

func main() {
    ctx, cancel := context.WithTimeout(context.Background(), 100*time.Millisecond)
    defer cancel()

    if err := exec.CommandContext(ctx, "sleep", "5").Run(); err != nil {
        // This will fail after 100 milliseconds. The 5 second sleep
        // will be interrupted.
    }
}

From the docs:

The provided context is used to kill the process (by calling os.Process.Kill) if the context becomes done before the command completes on its own.

After the Run() completes, you can inspect ctx.Err(). If the timeout was reached, the type of the error returned will be DeadLineExceeded. If it's nil, check the err returned by Run() to see if the command completed without errors.

9

A simpler version without select and channels.

func main() {
    cmd := exec.Command("cat", "/dev/urandom")
    cmd.Start()
    timer := time.AfterFunc(1*time.Second, func() {
        err := cmd.Process.Kill()
        if err != nil {
            panic(err) // panic as can't kill a process.
        }
    })
    err := cmd.Wait()
    timer.Stop()

    // read error from here, you will notice the kill from the 
    fmt.Println(err)
}

Well, after consulting some experienced go programmer, this is apparently not a GOly enough way to solve the problem. So please refer to the accepted answer.


Here is an even shorter version, and very straight forward. BUT, possibly having tons of hanging goroutines if timeout is long.

func main() {
    cmd := exec.Command("cat", "/dev/urandom")
    cmd.Start()
    go func(){
        time.Sleep(timeout)
        cmd.Process.Kill()
    }()
    return cmd.Wait()
}
0
7

While exec.CommandContext is very convenient and works fine in most cases, I had some issues with the process' children staying alive - which resulted in cmd.Wait() hanging.

If someone encounters a similar situation, here's how I solved the issue.

  1. Request process group to be created before starting the command using Setpgid
  2. Start a go routine that will kill the process group upon timeout

Naive example (for readability):

cmd := exec.Command("sleep", "5")

// Request the OS to assign process group to the new process, to which all its children will belong
cmd.SysProcAttr = &syscall.SysProcAttr{Setpgid: true}

go func() {
    time.Sleep(time.Second)
    // Send kill signal to the process group instead of single process (it gets the same value as the PID, only negative)
    syscall.Kill(-cmd.Process.Pid, syscall.SIGKILL) 
}

err := cmd.Run()
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}
log.Printf("Command finished successfully")

A bit nicer example (can be less intuitive for new Gophers):

    // Create a context with timeout, which will close ctx.Done() channel upon timeout
    ctx, cancel := context.WithTimeout(context.Background(), time.Second)
    defer cancel() // Make sure the context is canceled, which will close ctx.Done() channel on function exit
    cmd := exec.Command("sleep", "5")

    // Request the OS to assign process group to the new process, to which all its children will belong
    cmd.SysProcAttr = &syscall.SysProcAttr{Setpgid: true}

    go func() {
        // Wait until timeout or deferred cancellation
        <- ctx.Done()

        // Send kill signal to the process group instead of single process (it gets the same value as the PID, only negative)
        _ = syscall.Kill(-cmd.Process.Pid, syscall.SIGKILL)
    }()

    err := cmd.Run()
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    log.Printf("Command finished successfully")

P.S. For brevity, I replaced cmd.Start + cmd.Wait with cmd.Run

1
  • 1
    Thanks man, I've started a bash script (which has pipeline inside) from go and I was wondering why some resources haven't released. Your solution helped!
    – Nikita
    Sep 19, 2022 at 1:36

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