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I am been having a great curiosity.

I have written some java code & it is showing Null Pointer Exception. I am curious to know Why java gives Null Pointer Exception even if it does not support pointers?

marked as duplicate by Mark Rotteveel java Sep 7 '17 at 9:02

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    Admittedly, it could have been named: NullReferenceException... – assylias Aug 10 '12 at 12:56
  • @Aashish - legacy name may be as Java is written in C/C++? – Eugene Aug 10 '12 at 12:56
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    and C doesn't have a NULL pointer exception. that's truly unfair :P – PypeBros Aug 10 '12 at 12:57
  • Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/7436581/… – assylias Aug 10 '12 at 12:59
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    @sylvainulg sure it does, it is just named "segmentation fault" or similarly. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 10 '12 at 13:04
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Java does support pointers (which you use everytime you have a . or a [).

It doesn't support pointer arithmetic - i.e. the ability to manipulate a pointer into another pointer using math.

To point this out to converted C/C++ programmers, they did not carry the C name over, but named it something else. At the JVM level everything is pointers, but as Java programmers only see this when using references, the exception is badly named.

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the fact that there's no pointer arithmetic doesn't mean there's no pointer used in the language. And when it comes to Java, there is a lot of pointers, you just follow references with . rather than with ->.

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Object references are nothing but pointers but they are not complex as Pointers. Have a look at this for difference.

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Java does indeed have pointers. They can have two kinds of values: (a) references to objects, or (b) null. This is the language used in the Specification.

Java pointers are however much more akin to Pascal pointers than to C pointers.

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It's a carryover from java's "C" herritage. It's also the parlance of the trade.

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