98

Possible Duplicate:
local var referenced before assignment
Python 3: UnboundLocalError: local variable referenced before assignment

test1 = 0
def testFunc():
    test1 += 1
testFunc()

I am receiving the following error:

UnboundLocalError: local variable 'test1' referenced before assignment.

Error says that 'test1' is local variable but i thought that this variable is global

So is it global or local and how to solve this error without passing global test1 as argument to testFunc?

marked as duplicate by jamylak, Sven Marnach, Martijn Pieters, Wooble, bstpierre Aug 10 '12 at 20:14

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  • 6
    It is local, because you assign to it within the function. – Daniel Roseman Aug 10 '12 at 15:41
  • 1
    I received the same error but in my case it turned out to be an indentation problem. The code I was modifying was indented with spaces, but my editor was indenting with tabs. Dumb mistake on my part, and not at all the problem you had, but I hope to save someone out there some time by commenting here -- this was the first hit in my Google search. – Josh Aug 15 '17 at 19:19
165

In order for you to modify test1 while inside a function you will need to do define test1 as a global variable, for example:

test1 = 0
def testFunc():
    global test1 
    test1 += 1
testFunc()

However, if you only need to read the global variable you can print it without using the keyword global, like so:

test1 = 0
def testFunc():
     print test1 
testFunc()

But whenever you need to modify a global variable you must use the keyword global.

  • this is exactly what I needed – Coty Embry Jan 23 '17 at 5:27
  • Wow, this is such an ahem ahem odd language design decision. – Moff Kalast Nov 15 '18 at 17:36
47

Best solution: Don't use globals

>>> test1 = 0
>>> def test_func(x):
        return x + 1

>>> test1 = test_func(test1)
>>> test1
1
  • 5
    Totally agree, you don't know how global can mess up with the code later :) – Jim Raynor Oct 29 '15 at 3:14
  • 2
    This is a better answer with the concept of good practice when programming. – piskebee Mar 13 '18 at 9:49
8

You have to specify that test1 is global:

test1 = 0
def testFunc():
    global test1
    test1 += 1
testFunc()

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