0

I am starting to work on a project that is an offshoot of an existing (and currently in development) project. The new project is basically going to try to apply the existing solution to a new problem and make any modifications to the code if necessary, maybe even to the same files that the existing project may be modifying. But at the same time I want to be able to keep in sync with any important changes made by the other team on the existing project. The new application is different enough to justify a different project name or repository.

What is the best way to organize/manage the new project with SVN? Should I just create a branch of the existing trunk and manage the new project as a branch that is never merged back to trunk? Or should I create a different repository altogether and manually copy any changes to the existing project into the new project directory every once in a while? Manual copying seems like a really bad approach to me.

0

Should I just create a branch of the existing trunk and manage the new project as a branch that is never merged back to trunk?

Yes. Subversion will link to the files in the trunk, rather than copying them. As you make changes, only the changes will be kept in your branch.

However, the links point to the version of the files and folders that existed at the time of the branch. You will still have to copy trunk changes to your branch.

The best solution would be to factor out the common code, and put that in its own trunk.

  • Alright, thanks. – user1590949 Aug 13 '12 at 18:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.