143

I have several static classes in the namespace mySolution.Macros such as

static class Indent{    
     public static void Run(){
         // implementation
     }
     // other helper methods
}

So my question is how would it be possible to call those methods with the help of reflection?

If the methods were NOT static, then I could do this:

var macroClasses = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes().Where( x => x.Namespace.ToUpper().Contains("MACRO") );

foreach (var tempClass in macroClasses)
{
   var curInstance = Activator.CreateInstance(tempClass);
   // I know have an instance of a macro and will be able to run it

   // using reflection I can run the method as:
   curInstance.GetType().GetMethod("Run").Invoke(curInstance, null);
}

I would like to keep my classes static. How will I be able to do something similar with static methods?

In short I would like to call all the Run methods from all the static classes that are in the namespace mySolution.Macros.

4 Answers 4

185

As the documentation for MethodInfo.Invoke states, the first argument is ignored for static methods so you can just pass null.

foreach (var tempClass in macroClasses)
{
   // using reflection I will be able to run the method as:
   tempClass.GetMethod("Run").Invoke(null, null);
}

As the comment points out, you may want to ensure the method is static when calling GetMethod:

tempClass.GetMethod("Run", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static).Invoke(null, null);
3
  • 4
    you might want to pass some binding flags to GetMethod. Aug 10, 2012 at 19:40
  • 4
    Without BindingFlags.Static you may not successfully get the method in the first place...
    – ErikE
    Jan 20, 2016 at 16:34
  • 1
    You may want to add BindingFlags.FlattenHierarchy if the method resides in an ancestor class. Jun 8, 2019 at 14:51
21

You could really, really, really optimize your code a lot by paying the price of creating the delegate only once (there's also no need to instantiate the class to call an static method). I've done something very similar, and I just cache a delegate to the "Run" method with the help of a helper class :-). It looks like this:

static class Indent{    
     public static void Run(){
         // implementation
     }
     // other helper methods
}

static class MacroRunner {

    static MacroRunner() {
        BuildMacroRunnerList();
    }

    static void BuildMacroRunnerList() {
        macroRunners = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()
            .GetTypes()
            .Where(x => x.Namespace.ToUpper().Contains("MACRO"))
            .Select(t => (Action)Delegate.CreateDelegate(
                typeof(Action), 
                null, 
                t.GetMethod("Run", System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public)))
            .ToList();
    }

    static List<Action> macroRunners;

    public static void Run() {
        foreach(var run in macroRunners)
            run();
    }
}

It is MUCH faster this way.

If your method signature is different from Action you could replace the type-casts and typeof from Action to any of the needed Action and Func generic types, or declare your Delegate and use it. My own implementation uses Func to pretty print objects:

static class PrettyPrinter {

    static PrettyPrinter() {
        BuildPrettyPrinterList();
    }

    static void BuildPrettyPrinterList() {
        printers = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()
            .GetTypes()
            .Where(x => x.Name.EndsWith("PrettyPrinter"))
            .Select(t => (Func<object, string>)Delegate.CreateDelegate(
                typeof(Func<object, string>), 
                null, 
                t.GetMethod("Print", System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public)))
            .ToList();
    }

    static List<Func<object, string>> printers;

    public static void Print(object obj) {
        foreach(var printer in printers)
            print(obj);
    }
}
6

Class that will call the methods:

namespace myNamespace
{
    public class myClass
    {
        public static void voidMethodWithoutParameters()
        {
            // code here
        }
        public static string stringReturnMethodWithParameters(string param1, string param2)
        {
            // code here
            return "output";
        }
    }
}

Calling myClass static methods using Reflection:

var myClassType = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetType(GetType().Namespace + ".myClass");
                    
// calling my void Method that has no parameters.
myClassType.GetMethod("voidMethodWithoutParameters", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static).Invoke(null, null);

// calling my string returning Method & passing to it two string parameters.
Object methodOutput = myClassType.GetMethod("stringReturnMethodWithParameters", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static).Invoke(null, new object[] { "value1", "value1" });
Console.WriteLine(methodOutput.ToString());

Note: I don't need to instantiate an object of myClass to use it's methods, as the methods I'm using are static.

Great resources:

0

I prefer simplicity...

private void _InvokeNamespaceClassesStaticMethod(string namespaceName, string methodName, params object[] parameters) {
    foreach(var _a in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()) {
        foreach(var _t in _a.GetTypes()) {
            try {
                if((_t.Namespace == namespaceName) && _t.IsClass) _t.GetMethod(methodName, (BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public))?.Invoke(null, parameters);
            } catch { }
        }
    }
}

Usage...

    _InvokeNamespaceClassesStaticMethod("mySolution.Macros", "Run");

But in case you're looking for something a little more robust, including the handling of exceptions...

private InvokeNamespaceClassStaticMethodResult[] _InvokeNamespaceClassStaticMethod(string namespaceName, string methodName, bool throwExceptions, params object[] parameters) {
    var results = new List<InvokeNamespaceClassStaticMethodResult>();
    foreach(var _a in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()) {
        foreach(var _t in _a.GetTypes()) {
            if((_t.Namespace == namespaceName) && _t.IsClass) {
                var method_t = _t.GetMethod(methodName, parameters.Select(_ => _.GetType()).ToArray());
                if((method_t != null) && method_t.IsPublic && method_t.IsStatic) {
                    var details_t = new InvokeNamespaceClassStaticMethodResult();
                    details_t.Namespace = _t.Namespace;
                    details_t.Class = _t.Name;
                    details_t.Method = method_t.Name;
                    try {
                        if(method_t.ReturnType == typeof(void)) {
                            method_t.Invoke(null, parameters);
                            details_t.Void = true;
                        } else {
                            details_t.Return = method_t.Invoke(null, parameters);
                        }
                    } catch(Exception ex) {
                        if(throwExceptions) {
                            throw;
                        } else {
                            details_t.Exception = ex;
                        }
                    }
                    results.Add(details_t);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return results.ToArray();
}

private class InvokeNamespaceClassStaticMethodResult {
    public string Namespace;
    public string Class;
    public string Method;
    public object Return;
    public bool Void;
    public Exception Exception;
}

Usage is pretty much the same...

_InvokeNamespaceClassesStaticMethod("mySolution.Macros", "Run", false);
2
  • 2
    swallowing any possible exception is usually a bad idea.
    – D Stanley
    Feb 11, 2018 at 4:03
  • True. It was lazy but simple. I've improved my answer. Feb 11, 2018 at 4:26

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